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"engineering"13 articles archived since 1845

The Need for Belonging in Math and Science

From her earliest memories, Catherine Good was good at math. By second grade she was performing at the fourth grade level, sometimes even helping the teacher grade other students’ work.

October 21, 2013 — Scott Barry Kaufman
Engineering Is a Man’s Field: Changing a Stereotype with a Lesson from India

Engineering Is a Man’s Field: Changing a Stereotype with a Lesson from India

Among rude people, the women are generally degraded; among civilized people they are exalted. —James Mill, The History of British India Two years back, we were putting together a report on the employability (job-readiness) of engineering students in India based on the results of AMCAT, a job-skills test my company and I developed (Aspiring Minds [...]

October 24, 2013 — Varun Aggarwal

Will the Robot Uprising Be Squishy?

Octopuses offer an extreme engineering challenge: They are almost infinitely flexible, entirely soft-bodied and incredibly intelligent. Are we vertebrate humans ever going to be able to build anything as deformable and complex as a real octopus?

July 26, 2013 — Katherine Harmon
To What Extent Do We See With Mathematics?

To What Extent Do We See With Mathematics?

When I first became fascinated with mathematics’ tightly knit abstract structures, its prominence in physics and engineering reassured me.  Mathematics’ indisputable value in science made it clear that my preoccupation with its intangible expressions was not pathological.  The captivating creative activity of doing mathematics has real consequences.

November 27, 2013 — Joselle Kehoe
Octopus Suckers Have Groovy Secret for Strength

Octopus Suckers Have Groovy Secret for Strength

Octopus suckers are extraordinary. They can move and grasp objects independently. They can “taste” the water around them. They can even form a seal on rough surfaces underwater.

December 1, 2013 — Katherine Harmon Courage
Why we need to stop comparing every Big Science project to the Manhattan Project

Why we need to stop comparing every Big Science project to the Manhattan Project

Alex Wellerstein who is a historian of nuclear science has some cogent thoughts that feed into what has long since been a pet peeve of mine: the tendency for politicians, the media and scientists themselves to compare every large-scale government science or technology enterprise to the famed Manhattan Project.

November 25, 2013 — Ashutosh Jogalekar
Inspiring Young Men from Minority Backgrounds to Code

Inspiring Young Men from Minority Backgrounds to Code

On a sign that adorns the premises of the vibrant New York technology charity, All Star Code, the bold messaging could not be clearer.  Displayed in large writing are the top ten principles that inspired the charity's creation.

January 23, 2015 — Alex Jackson
Neutrinos on Ice: How to Keep Cool in Thin Air

Neutrinos on Ice: How to Keep Cool in Thin Air

Editor's Note: Welcome to ANITA, the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna! From October to December, Katie Mulrey is traveling with the ANITA collaboration to Antarctica to build and launch ANITA III, a scientific balloon that uses the entire continent of Antarctica for neutrino and cosmic ray detection.

December 1, 2014 — Katie Mulrey

Fighting Zeppelins with Airplanes, 1915

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: June 26, 1915After the First World War broke out, airships quickly became a scourge. German Zeppelins bombed Liège and Antwerp in Belgium and perhaps hastened the fall of those two cities even though there were few casualties (as we understand such things in our more dismal era).

June 26, 2015 — Dan Schlenoff

Soft Robots

Inspired by the the octopus, engineers are creating robots that can twist their way around problems that rigid robots can’t handle.This article was reproduced with permission and was first published on February 3, 2016. It is a Nature Video production.

February 4, 2016 — Nature Video