ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network

Posts Tagged "coal"

Expeditions

Electroshocking for fish at the Kingston Coal-Ash Spill Site

Editor’s Note: Expedition Blue Planet, led by Jacques Cousteau’s granddaughter Alexandra Cousteau, is traveling 14,500 miles of road over 138 days to investigate and film some of North America’s most pressing water-use and management stories. Each week expedition members will file a dispatch from the field for Scientific American until the expedition concludes on November [...]

Keep reading »
Expeditions

A visit with people affected by the largest industrial spill in American history

Editor’s Note: Expedition Blue Planet, led by Jacques Cousteau’s granddaughter Alexandra Cousteau, is traveling 14,500 miles of road over 138 days to investigate and film some of North America’s most pressing water-use and management stories. Each week expedition members will file a dispatch from the field for Scientific American until the expedition concludes on November [...]

Keep reading »
Expeditions

On eve of EPA hearings, scientists sample lake for coal-ash toxins

Editor’s Note: Expedition Blue Planet, led by Jacques Cousteau’s granddaughter Alexandra Cousteau, is traveling 14,500 miles of road over 138 days to investigate and film some of North America’s most pressing water-use and management stories. Each week expedition members will file a dispatch from the field for Scientific American until the expedition concludes on November [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Americans Who Mistrust Climate Scientists Take Cues from Global Temperatures

Screen shot 2014-07-29 at 5.02.50 PM

The White House obviously accepts the science behind human-caused climate change, as was made clear again this week by its announcement of plans to cut carbon emissions from U.S. power plants 30 percent from 2005 levels by the year 2030. Some Americans remain skeptical—but they’re in the minority. As The New York Times reports, most [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Obama’s Clean Power Plan Means More Gas to Fight Global Warming [Video]

mountaineer-co2-capture-unit

400 PPM: What’s Next for a Warming Planet Concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have reached this level for the first time in millions of years. What does this portend? » If the power plant goes away, so do the jobs, and then the town. That’s the fear in New Haven, West Virginia, home [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

World’s Deadliest Fuel Made Safe and Clean?

bituminous-coal

Coal kills. When it’s not horrific mining accidents like the one in Soma, Turkey, on May 13 that killed more than 300 miners, it’s the 13,000 Americans who die early each year because of air pollution from burning the dirtiest fossil fuel. Coal is a way of life, providing jobs and inexpensive energy wherever it [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

How Many More Coal Ash Spills?

dan-river-coal-ash-ponds

What is the largest type of trash produced in the U.S.? It’s not whatever you’re thinking, most likely. It’s coal ash. Burning coal produces more than 100 million metric tons of coal ash per year—the gray or black sooty aftermath of our fossil fuel habit. Even though a good chunk of it is turned into [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

12 Graphics That Contain Everything You Need to Know about Climate Change

earth-energy-heat-budget

Climate change is real, it’s here and it will be affecting the planet for a long, long time. That’s the lesson of the latest iteration of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change‘s state of climate science report, released in its entirety on January 30. Concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere have now touched 400 [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

What Do China’s New Policies Mean for the Environment?

china-high-speed-train

BEIJING—A Chinese high speed train whispers into the station, before finally engaging the brakes and coming to a stop with a sound like the tinkling of breaking glass. Five years ago, such trains hardly existed. In the span of one Communist-style planning period, China has built a high-speed train network that now crosses the entire [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Drunks and Gravediggers Wax Poetic about Climate Change

Craven_Arms_station 300x

Want to know what climate change really means to people? Emily Hinshelwood found out in a most unusual way. For days on end the Welsh poet and writer walked the 121-mile train route known as the Heart of Wales Line and asked every single person she met the same three questions: What images come to [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

“All of the Above” Energy Means More Fracking, Renewables, Nukes and Clean Coal

ernest-moniz

There is no technical issue with fracking, the controversial technique of fracturing shale rock with high-pressure, chemically treated water to release natural gas. But there is clearly a political one, judging by the multiple interruptions to a talk at Columbia University by new Secretary of Energy Ernest J. Moniz. The affable former M.I.T. professor and [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Why Jim Hansen Stopped Being a Government Scientist [Video]

Why did James Hansen retire on April 2 after 32 years as director of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies? As he told the enterprising students of Columbia University’s Sustainability Media Lab who captured him in the following video, “I want to devote full time to trying to help the public understand the urgency of [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Meet the New Secretary of Energy Nominee: Ernie Moniz

ernest-moniz

Ernest J. Moniz, a nuclear physicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who serves on Scientific American’s board of advisors, will be President Barack Obama’s pick to replace Nobel laureate Steven Chu as Secretary of Energy. While Moniz has yet to win a Nobel, he served on the President’s Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear [...]

Keep reading »
Plugged In

Map Monday: 50+ Shades of Air Pollution

One-fourth of the world is breathing unsafe air. Courtesy of Hsu et al/The Atlantic

In today’s installment of Map Monday, I wanted to focus on air pollution as mapped by Hsu et al and The Atlantic. Go to this link to see the full interactive map, which details air pollution by country and city. Below, I have copied in a global snapshot with some perhaps unsurprising shades of pollution [...]

Keep reading »
Plugged In

Photo Friday: Order Coal Now (1918)

3552165412_ba8e786a2c_o

This poster of a man shoveling coal from a cart was created by J.C. Leyendecker for the Saturday Evening Post magazine. It was created with sponsorship from the United States Federal Fuel Administration. This World War I era agency that was orginally established in 1917 via the Food and Fuel Control Act, in part to address concerns over [...]

Keep reading »
Plugged In

Guest Post: Stanford divests from coal – good choice or bad call?

mcnally_coal

Stanford University will stop investing in coal companies after its Board of Trustees voted in support of eliminating direct investments in publically traded companies that mine coal for electricity generation. In response to yesterday’s vote, Stanford’s President John Hennessy stated “moving away from coal in the investment context is a small but constructive step while [...]

Keep reading »
Plugged In

God Controls the Climate, So You Can Relax

Detail of God creating the sun, moon and planets from the Sistine Chapel / Michelangelo Buonarroti

I know, he’s just a Tea Party candidate with almost no chance of election, but Greg Brannon, primary candidate for the GOP nomination for the U.S. Senate seat currently held by Kay Hagen, said in a debate the other night that God controls the climate. And here all this time you’ve thought it was physics. [...]

Keep reading »
Plugged In

Photo Friday: Coal gasification

9453076690_e643b70d00_b

Last summer at the Rocky Mountain Test Facility in Wyoming, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists tested the practical potential of large-scale coal gasification facilities in a series of field experiments. This technology is considered a promising component of future “clean coal” power plants with their ability to capture and sequester carbon dioxide emissions. Photo [...]

Keep reading »
Plugged In

Explaining Appalachia’s coal woes – in two charts and a map

AFP PHOTO / Saul LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

Cheaper Wyoming coal has been displacing more expensive Appalachian coal for decades.

Keep reading »
Plugged In

Market forces have been hurting coal long before the EPA’s CO2 rules

taichi_385

War on coal? Not really. More like climate policy tai chi by the EPA.

Keep reading »
Plugged In

Don’t just blame the EPA – coal exports are down, too

coalbarge_seine_385

It’s important to understand that not all of the bad news for the coal industry is coming by way of the EPA. While the CO2 limits for new coal and gas plants complicates domestic power generation, the global market for U.S. coal is softening. Up until several months ago, many people (myself included) were expecting [...]

Keep reading »
Plugged In

Running the numbers on EPA’s new CO2 regulations: natural gas combined cycle stacks up well

TI-89_385

Existing technology like combined cycle generation could be used to meet EPA’s stricter CO2 emissions limits

Keep reading »
Plugged In

Tax credits – the wind in wind energy

For wind power, 2011 was a great year. California added more new wind energy to the grid than any other state, according to a report published Tuesday by the U.S. Department of Energy. A number of other states received high honors as well. These include Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Oklahoma and Colorado, which churned out at [...]

Keep reading »
The Thoughtful Animal

Intelligence, Cancer, and Eyjafjallaj

ResearchBlogging.org

This seems to have become unofficial volcano week, here at ScienceBlogs. If you haven’t been following the coverage of the Eyjafjallaj

Keep reading »

More from Scientific American

Scientific American Special Universe

Get the latest Special Collector's edition

Secrets of the Universe: Past, Present, Future

Order Now >

X

Email this Article

X