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Posts Tagged "cities"

Anthropology in Practice

When the Lights Go Down in the City

Ed note: This post originally appeared on the original home of Anthropology in Practice. It seemed appropriate to share in light of the SciAm cities feature – particularly as I’m traveling. See you Friday! As the sun sinks over the Hudson River, New York City doesn’t power down. Lights flicker on and soon the famous [...]

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Assignment: Impossible

Cities Might Influence Not Just Our Civilizations, but Our Evolution

Cities reverberate through history as centers of civilization. Ur. Babylon. Rome. Baghdad. Tenochtitlan. Beijing. Paris. London. New York. As pivotal as cities have been for our art and culture, our commerce and trade, our science and technology, our wars and peace, it turns out that cities might have been even more important than we had [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Political Leaders Gather at D.C. Reception to Discuss Scientific American‘s Special Issue on Cities

Mariette DiChristina at podium, speaking

Congressional staffers, federal agency senior personnel, non-profit leaders and scientific organization executives joined Scientific American Editor in chief Mariette DiChristina at a recent reception to celebrate the magazine’s special issue on cities. “Celebrating cities in many ways is celebrating what is best in us,” DiChristina told the crowd as she kicked off the evening honoring [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Reception on Capitol Hill Will Celebrate Scientific American‘s Cities Issue

September issue of SA, cover

Cities can help solve many of humankind’s most pressing problems, a topic that is explored in-depth in Scientific American‘s September single-topic issue. In fact, today’s cities are increasingly pointing the way toward solutions, rather than simply being a source of health, social and environmental problems. For instance, people living in urban areas produce more patents, [...]

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Culturing Science

Urban ecology doesn’t have enough humans in it

citynature2

When you read the word “nature,” what do you think of? Maybe you imagine a dark wood with sunlight reaching a mottled floor of foliage, thrushes singing and chipmunks hopping. Maybe you peer through grassy dunes at sanderlings running back and forth in the surf , occasionally halting to frantically peck at the sand. Or [...]

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Observations

12 Graphics That Contain Everything You Need to Know about Climate Change

earth-energy-heat-budget

Climate change is real, it’s here and it will be affecting the planet for a long, long time. That’s the lesson of the latest iteration of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change‘s state of climate science report, released in its entirety on January 30. Concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere have now touched 400 [...]

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Observations

Can Cities Be Both “Resilient” and “Sustainable”?

gowanus-canal

This article arises from Future Tense, a partnership of Slate, the New America Foundation, and Arizona State University. On the evening of Wednesday, Oct. 24, Future Tense and Scientific American will be hosting an event in New York City on building resilient cities. To learn more and to RSVP, visit the New America Foundation website. [...]

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Observations

Imagination + a Little Movie Magic = a Volkswagen Hover Car Silently Navigating City Streets [Video]

Volkswagen,hover car,magnetic

A year ago, Volkswagen in China launched a marketing campaign called The People’s Car Project (PCP), which invited Chinese customers to submit ideas for cars of the future. Participants were able to tinker with designs on a Web site that Volkswagen set up for that purpose, or they could upload their own designs. Wang Jia, [...]

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Observations

Can the “Urban Advantage” Bring Better Global Health as City Populations Skyrocket?

urban health advantage cities population growth

City dwellers are thought to be, on average, healthier than their rural counterparts. This so-called urban health advantage is usually attributed to better access to health care and improved overall infrastructure, such as clean water, safety and education. But many of the globe’s cities are already bursting and actually offer a far worse quality of [...]

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Observations

The Cool City Challenge: Getting a Low-Carbon Lifestyle to Catch On

Most people are aware that reducing carbon emissions could help the planet. But convincing a particular individual to change his or her behavior in ways that emit less carbon—not to mention the behavior of an entire city—can be a monumental challenge. David Gershon, founder of the Empowerment Institute in Woodstock, N.Y., is taking on that [...]

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Observations

Can Shrinking Cities Regrow as Farms? [Video]

While much of the rest of the world undergoes an incredible surge in urbanization, certain cities in the U.S. continue to shrink in population, and thus geography. The leader of that pack, as it were, is Detroit. This is nothing new, of course. Rome went from imperial capital to grazing land for shepherds and back [...]

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Observations

A Mobile “Lab” for Urban Conversations Debuts in New York City [Video]

It’s just a simple black structure in a long, narrow lot. But then again, simplicity is the point. The temporary building, known as the BMW Guggenheim Lab, opened August 3 in New York City, taking over a vacant lot to provide a venue for addressing urban challenges with a series of free events, including lectures, [...]

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Plugged In

Drown your town: what does your hometown look like with sea level rise?

drownyourtownLA_385

A Google Maps hack provides a sneak peak at sea level rise.

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Plugged In

Designing Our Own Neighborhoods

After a half-century of brutal urban renewal, sidewalkless cul de sacs, and unwalkable sprawl, planners all over the world have turned towards what was left out of planning for decades: community. Whether it’s planning approaches like Complete Streets or assessment methods like walkability scores, communities have learned that people want to interact with their surroundings [...]

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Plugged In

Review of Urbanized, Gary Hustwit’s urban design documentary

Urbanized is the third entry in Gary Hustwit’s designed-themed trilogy. The first film, Helvetica, explored the nerdery of how information is designed and shared through the world’s most ubiquitous typeface. The sequel, Objectified, took a step back and looked at how nearly everything we interact with each day, from the toothbrush in our bathroom to [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

A Surefire Way to Sharpen Your Focus

peaceful scene, village by the water

How many times have you arrived someplace but had no memory of the trip there? Have you ever been sitting in an auditorium daydreaming, not registering what the people on stage are saying or playing? We often spin through our days lost in mental time travel, thinking about something from the past, or future, leaving [...]

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