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Meanwhile in Australia

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.


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Remember these guys from a couple days ago?

With an “extreme” and “historic” cold snap bearing down on the US, it’s easy to forget that it’s summer in the Southern Hemisphere. And our friends in Australia are experiencing some rather, umm, warm temperatures.

The Guardian reports:

Temperatures in parts of Australia are set to reach almost 50C in the coming days, with total fire bans in place in northern regions of South Australia and a week-long heatwave enveloping Queensland. The Bureau of Meteorology has forecast the temperature to hit 49C in the South Australian town of Moomba on Thursday, while Oodnadatta, which reached 47.7C on Wednesday, will warm to 48C. South Australia’s Country Fire Service has rated fire conditions for the north-west and north-east regions of the state as “catastrophic”, with winds from former tropical cyclone Christine exacerbating conditions.

50C is a little over 120F. Global climate change works both ways. There are extreme cold and hot weather events (along with a host of other indicators and effects).

Weather map: Bureau of Meteorology

David Wogan About the Author: An engineer and policy researcher who writes about energy, technology, and policy - and everything in between. Based in Austin, Texas. Comments? david.m.wogan@gmail.com Follow on Twitter @davidwogan.

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.





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  1. 1. Carlyle 2:04 am 01/6/2014

    As I have pointed out numerous times before, BOM forecasts rarely match actual results. This is no exception. Some records were broken but many fell short of the forecasts. Brisbane for example was forecast to reach 41C at the official site. It got to 38C. How about publishing the actual rather than the forecast?

    Link to this
  2. 2. Carlyle 2:55 am 01/6/2014

    Two of the towns listed in your report: Maximum temperature reached at Moomba on Thursday 2nd was in fact 49.3C but to put that in perspective, that only ranks 12th hottest January in the last 17 years.
    Oodnadatta reached 47C not the 48C forecast. The highest recorded temperature for Oodnadatta was 50.7C back on 2nd January 1960.
    I am sick to death of the BOM out of perspective exaggerations.
    http://www.eldersweather.com.au/dailysummary.jsp?lt=site&lc=17043

    Link to this
  3. 3. sault 4:01 pm 01/6/2014

    Keep grasping at those straws, Carlyle!

    Link to this
  4. 4. Uncle.Al 7:50 pm 01/6/2014

    Don’t have your summer near perihelion. Now, pay your Carbon Tax on Everything.

    Link to this
  5. 5. Postman1 7:57 pm 01/7/2014

    Carlyle’s ‘straws’ sound more like observed ‘facts’.
    I saw this same article on another site and there were also several Aussies on there yelling “BS”.
    You can predict anything you want, but predictions are not facts.

    Link to this
  6. 6. Crasher 6:39 pm 01/9/2014

    The Bureau of Meteorology is Australia official weather man. It has the all the records from OZ’s albeit short recorded history. It is run by professionals with public scrutiny of their actions. They are held in high regard.
    Carlyle doesn’t like the truth…it annoys his ultra right wing conservative masters who are worried about losing their coal investments.
    Australia was the hottest it has every been in recorded history….it just the FACTS from the experts…..
    http://www.climatecouncil.org.au/2014/01/08/offthecharts/
    Science is about facts….NOT ideology.

    Link to this
  7. 7. Crasher 6:44 pm 01/9/2014

    Oh and Carlyle check the reference list from the experts….
    http://www.climatecouncil.org.au/reference-list/

    No rubbish, just FACTS and Measurments by those who do it for a living.

    Link to this

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