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Fracking gets the NMA Taiwan animation treatment


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Fracking actually got the treatment several months ago as people started worrying their sinks might ignite from methane contamination, but I just saw it this week. It does a decent job of summarizing the general idea behind fracking (pump a bunch of fluids underground to crack rock, extract natural gas) and why people are concerned/opposed/scared about its possible effect on groundwater (your sink might ignite, no biggie).

In light of the new report out of UT Austin’s Energy Institute, it would be good a new animation with an update from the science community that groundwater contamination may not be a direct result of fracking and related fluids, but possibly from spilling fluids above ground. I’m not sure these fracking videos are anywhere near as viral as say this hilarious Rick Perry treatment, but making sure up-to-date (and accurate!) scientific information is available to the public is as important as the science.

While we’re on it, an updated animation might as well have the exaggerated reactions of the pro natural gas/fracking camp and its opponents similar to this brilliant animation of Canada withdrawing from the Kyoto protocol. It wouldn’t be that far off the mark, right?

David Wogan About the Author: An engineer and policy researcher who writes about energy, technology, and policy - and everything in between. Based in Austin, Texas. Comments? david.m.wogan@gmail.com Follow on Twitter @davidwogan.

The views expressed are those of the author and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.





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