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Posts Tagged "diversity"

Context and Variation

Diversity in Science Carnival: Identity Edition

I have a million thoughts swirling in my head after Science Online 2013, and a million more things I want to learn about and accomplish for Science Online 2014. I find reflection after these conferences a useful way to organize all those thoughts, and make an action plan for what I need to learn and [...]

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Guest Blog

Under-represented and underserved: Why minority role models matter in STEM

A recent University of Massachusetts Amherst study found having academic contact with female professionals in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) can have positive influences on students—female students in particular. For girls and young women studying these subjects in school, being able to identify female role models helps them imagine themselves as STEM professionals. The [...]

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The Ocelloid

Amoebae shelled and naked

Some amoebae build elaborate houses for themselves to live in. (top and side view of an Arcellinid) Some build their houses out of siliceous (glass) scales and peek out of them with thread-like pseudopods called filopodia. (optical sections of a Euglypha cristata from a soil sample) Some amoebae can be naked. (Saccamoeba(?) Note the wrinkly-bulby [...]

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Octopus Chronicles

Unusual Octopods Elude Science: The Case of the Football Octopus

rare football octopus

Shallow-water octopuses can be difficult enough to find. They camouflage against corals, hide in holes and generally make themselves scarce. But researchers can at least attempt to observe and collect them by snorkeling, diving or skimming nets and bottom trawls. The rest of the vast, dark ocean, however, presents a much larger sampling challenge. So [...]

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Oscillator

Diversity Correlates With Success: Gender and Synthetic Biology

Study of Gender Diversity in Prize-Winning iGEM Teams by Paris Bettencourt iGEM 2013

I’ve been at iGEM (an undergraduate engineering competition in synthetic biology) this weekend learning about all the amazing bioengineering projects that students from around the world have been building. I’ll be writing more about many of these projects soon, but I wanted to highlight the work of one team on issues of gender diversity in [...]

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The Scicurious Brain

Guest Post 6! Building STEM Bridges: Scientists Overcoming Isolation by Building Community

WilsonCB_Headshot_for_SciAM

Please Welcome Guest Post , from my old stomping grounds at U Penn, Caleph Wilson! Diversity has become a watchword in the scientific community. For the last 20 years colleges, universities, government science agencies and private foundations have worked to increase the numbers of scientists from under-represented backgrounds. Some of these policy changes have resulted [...]

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The Scicurious Brain

Guest Post 5: Accommodasians don’t make waves.

33124666_c912b00f63

Please welcome our fifth guest post, from AmasianV! In the aftermath of SciAm’s recent snafu handling of DNLee’s post, in which she recounted her interaction with an editor who called her an “urban whore,” Sci asked me to guest blog for a series of posts aimed at getting more diverse voices heard. Diversity? Voices? That’s [...]

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The Scicurious Brain

Guest Post 4! Don’t Just Assume You Should Know: How To Be An Excellent Mentor

800px-Buenos_Aires_at_night

Of course, latin-american foreigners are minorities in Pittsburgh. And that is totally fine. Yes, it can be challenging but also rewarding and awesome. I am originally from Colombia, where I did my undergrad. Back then, in my early 20’s I decided to go abroad. So, in 2008 I moved to Pittsburgh and I have found [...]

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The Scicurious Brain

Guest Post 3: If these blogs could talk: characterizing power, privilege, and everyday life in the sciences

microagress

Please welcome the next guest group, the Microaggression Tumblr! The discussions sparked by the recent removal of DNLee’s blog post about her treatment by a member of the scientific community is a great teaching moment on how marginalization in the sciences, or any sector of society, operates in everyday life. These incidents may seem specific [...]

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The Scicurious Brain

Guest Post 2: Automatic ‘othering’

Hermie fig1

Please welcome the second in the guest post series, the fantastic D-list monktress, Hermitage! So, I’m one of the ‘bloggers you’ve never heard of’ that Scicurious has graciously invited to be part of her diversity guest post series. Which Sci made very clear is supposed to be an uplifting outlet for all of the e-rage [...]

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The Scicurious Brain

Guest Post 1: In the end, let’s make sure something good comes out.

Rim Photo rat

Please welcome the first of this week’s guest bloggers, Rim! Hello lovers, When Sci asked me to guest blog for her week of diversity, I was at first flattered but then I had a few moments of hesitation. I ran through a mental list of why I shouldn’t write the post, did I really have [...]

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The Scicurious Brain

Standing with DNLee5: Let’s Get Voices Heard

If you’ve been on the Scientific American network at all over the past weekend, or on twitter for that matter, you can’t have missed all that’s been going on. The short version: my fantastic friend and colleague Danielle (@DNLee5), who blogs at SciAm under “The Urban Scientist“, was asked for a guest post at another [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Where Are the Gifted Minorities?

Guest blog by Frank C. Worrell, Paula Olszewski-Kubilius and Rena F. Subotnik For more than a quarter century, critics have faulted gifted education programs for catering to kids from advantaged backgrounds. These programs do, after all, typically enroll outsized numbers of European American and Asian American students hailing from relatively well-off homes. Members of other [...]

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