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Posts Tagged "sciart"

Image of the Week

Underground Beauty

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On Symbiartic, September is a month-long celebration of science artists called the SciArt Blitz. A different science artist is featured each day, so head over and check out the latest from the science art world. This piece is a soon-to-be mural at the Denver Botanical Gardens in Denver, CO by Marjorie Leggitt. It illustrates the underground world [...]

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Image of the Week

A Genome is Not a Blueprint

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Image: 1936 Joy Oil gas station blueprints (top); sequence from human chromosome 1 (bottom). Source: from A Monkey’s Blueprint by Martin Krzywinski on SA Visual When artist Martin Krzywinski was challenged to come up with a graphic that quickly and concisely shows how the human genome is more similar to chimpanzee and bonobo genomes than [...]

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Image of the Week

Guinness-Busting Bug

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Credit: China News Service/Zhong Xin Source: Bec Crew’s Largest aquatic insect in the world found in China on Running Ponies Remember the Guinness Book of World Records? Poring over the pages of tiny text and black and white images of record breakers was a hallowed summer time-busting tradition, at least in my circle of friends. [...]

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Image of the Week

Have a Heart, Kill Your Lawn

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Source: Katie McKissick’s Symbiartic post: Don’t Be a Water Jerk. Image © Katie McKissick Few things are more inviting than a flawless green turf, stretching out before you like a luscious green tumbling mat – unless, of course, that lawn is in the Southwestern United States and you are aware of the severity of the [...]

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Image of the Week

The Emerging Mosquito

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Image Credit: © Alex Wild Source: Recipe For A Photograph #4: The Emerging Mosquito, on Compound Eye As the weather warms and spring marches into summer, mosquito pupae are shedding their skins and emerging from stagnant pools to search for warm mammalian blood. The thought of swarms of pesky mosquitoes and the itchy red welts [...]

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Image of the Week

Monitoring the Many Faces of Monitors

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Artist: Darren Naish Source: Monitor musings, varanid variables, goannasaurian goings-on… it’s about monitor lizards, by Darren Naish on Tetrapod Zoology If you’re not a herpetologist, you may be of the mindset that lizards all look the same, but that would only expose you for what you are: a human primate, finely attuned to the faces [...]

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Image of the Week

The 500-lb. Chicken From Hell

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Source: 500-Pound “Chicken from Hell” Dinosaur Once Roamed North America by Kate Wong at Observations Illustration credit: Mark Klingler, Carnegie Museum of Natural History Nothing you could find in any hen house could prepare you for the 11.5-foot tall, 500-lb. behemoth that roamed the landscape 66-million years ago in what is today North and South [...]

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Image of the Week

Tragically Beautiful

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Source: ScienceArt On View in March/April 2014 on Symbiartic Populations of frogs, salamanders and other amphibians are rapidly declining worldwide, and those that remain are increasingly falling victim to environmental pollutants that cause deformities such as extra limbs and ambiguous sexual organs. Brandon Ballengée’s work aims to draw attention to their plight through visually arresting [...]

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The Ocelloid

An ink dinoflagellate

Things have been a little tense lately… here, have a dinoflagellate! (kinda looks like a space ship, no?) This ink drawing is based on Protoperidium, a dinoflagellate notable for its ‘pallium feeding‘: upon finding something tasty but awkwardly-shaped, it extrudes a ‘feeding veil’ in the form of a pseudopod-like structure, which then envelops the prey [...]

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The Ocelloid

Drawing trilobites, and the life of Midwestern coral reefs

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Yes, Indiana has coral reefs. More on that in a bit. A couple days ago I entered a trilobite doodling spree, and have come up with a sort of technique for drawing them. Their diversity is astounding, but this is the basic body plan, which gets tinkered by the different species. Haven’t figured out how [...]

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The Ocelloid

Protist-y art continued: the protist zodiac

One night, when I was definitely completely sober in every way possible (of course!), it struck me that while both the European and Chinese zodiacs (ones I’m familiar with) display a nice variety of animals with and without backbones (I happen to be spineless according to the European one, and scaly and flame-breathing according to [...]

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The Ocelloid

Some protist-y art

For me, the second more relaxing activity after microscopy is vector art. And then regular art. (This excludes non-activities, such as napping in the sun, and staring at life passing by. That’s all I’d do if one didn’t have to work — watch things.) Since I’m not often creative with my subject matter, the art [...]

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Symbiartic

Small Science-Themed Art

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December 1st is the deadline to participate in an exciting annual exhibit at the Art.Science.Gallery in Austin, TX. For years, artists have created small trading cards to exchange amongst themselves at conferences and gatherings, but according to the rules of exchange, these cards must never be bought or sold. Art.Science.Gallery, a brick-and-mortar gallery in Austin, [...]

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Symbiartic

Will SciArt Find a Foothold on Ello?

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Ello and their “you are not a product” manifesto swept through social media discourse like an eyeless smiling tornado a few weeks ago. Clearly, people are dissatisfied enough with existing ad-ridden, privacy-averse networks like Facebook and (please gawd no, not my Twitter) Twitter that they are willing to give it a shot. This new network [...]

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Symbiartic

Aren’t Cancer Cells the Worst?

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I try to find humor in some unfunny places, but I was never sure how to approach cancer. I first did a comic about cancer genes for my book What’s in Your Genes?, which seems to find the happy place between facts and silliness. I recently updated it in full color: To do a comic [...]

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Symbiartic

Barbie Reincarnate – Only This Time She Looks Human

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Nobody goes around saying they want to look like Barbie when they grow up, at least not anymore. But with Halloween fast approaching, I dare you to find a class of kindergarteners that does not have at least half the girls planning to be princesses of some sort or another. If the princess craze doesn’t [...]

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Symbiartic

Looking Back on 30 Science Artists in 30 Days

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For three years now we have been celebrating science artists here on Symbiartic. Every September we have stepped it up a notch to feature a different science artist each day in our September SciArt Blitz. In case you missed any of them, here is a visual summary of the 2014 SciArt Blitz artists (click on [...]

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Symbiartic

Inside a Changing Autumn Leaf

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One of the great wonders of life is watching the leaves change colors in the fall. When temperatures get cool, chlorophyll begins to break down revealing the underlying pigments in the plants’ sap. This depiction of the inner-workings of a maple leaf shows the process in action (see the annotated version that appeared in The [...]

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Symbiartic

What Happens When a Science Cartoonist Paints

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I’m all about the science comics and cartoony illustrations, but just like Kalliopi said yesterday, sometimes we science artists like to mix it up. For a while I was putting down my pencil and picking up a paintbrush. It was an adjustment to not be able to render things as exactly as one can with [...]

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Symbiartic

Is There Anything the Mimic Octopus *Can’t* Do?

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According to science comic, xkcd, the answer is no: For the past 25 days, we have been showing off a different artist each day who is working at the intersection of science and art. We have included sculptors, medical illustrators, comics, painters, concept artists and more. Now, with the month coming to a close, it’s [...]

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Symbiartic

Portraits of Bonsai at the Brooklyn Botanic Gardens

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As I write this, the Brooklyn Botanic Gardens is preparing an exhibit showcasing the work of Dick Rauh, a botanical illustrator who has distinguished himself as a master of botanical illustration since he picked up a pen and paper in his retirement. In a show called “Patience, Paper, Pen and Brush,” the Gardens will be [...]

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Symbiartic

If Neurons Could Talk

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Immy Smith does it all – cartooning, fine art, neuroscience and taking part in the art+science “collaborative of polymathic artists”, Imagining Science.  Smith is even visiting artist at an herbarium. For the September SciArt Blitz, I had originally planned to share one of Smith’s fine art pieces – but these neurons are so weirdly charming. [...]

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