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Posts Tagged "cell biology"

The Artful Amoeba

Love Wine and Tea? Scientists Discover Plant Part Whence Their Pucker Springs

tea_cup_variety_wiki_pd_200

When you take a sip of red wine or black tea, you’re swallowing a stiff swig of tannins. These astringent plant chemicals give the beverages their characteristic pucker. Now, the part of plant cells that makes and transports tannins — long overlooked by botanists — has at last been discovered, hiding right under our noses. [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

How Your Morning Commute Resembles a Fungus

neurospora_crassa_nuclear_traffic_screenshot_200

In many fungi, the DNA storage compartments called nuclei are not prisoners of the cells they reside in, the way they are in animals and plants. Instead, fungal nuclei are free to move about the cabin. They flow through the joined, tube-shaped cells of fungi like busy commuters, and experience many of the same dynamics. [...]

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Brainwaves

Know Your Neurons: What Is the Ratio of Glia to Neurons in the Brain?

Previously, on Know Your Neurons: Chapter 1: The Discovery and Naming of the Neuron Chapter 2: How to Classify Different Types of Neurons Chapter 3: Meet the Glia Chapter 4: What is the Ratio of Glia to Neurons in the Brain? By Daisy Yuhas and Ferris Jabr Last time on Know Your Neurons, we talked [...]

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Brainwaves

Know Your Neurons: Meet the Glia

glia drawing

Previously, on Know Your Neurons: Chapter 1: The Discovery and Naming of the Neuron Chapter 2: How to Classify Different Types of Neurons, or The Dendrology of the Neuron Forest Chapter 3: Know Your Neurons: Meet the Glia *By Daisy Yuhas Trillions of cells in your brain communicate with one another, respond to infections, guide [...]

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Brainwaves

Know Your Neurons: How to Classify Different Types of Neurons in the Brain’s Forest

illustrations-of-neurons

Previously, on Know Your Neurons: Chapter 1: The Discovery and Naming of the Neuron Chapter 2: How to Classify Different Types of Neurons, or The Dendrology of the Neuron Forest Scientists have organized the cells that make up the nervous system into two broad groups: neurons, which are the primary signaling cells, and glia, which [...]

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The Ocelloid

Theileria gets naked and rides the spindle

Hijacking of the cell by its uninvited invaders is one of the coolest things in biology. Not only do these parasites leech off its food, they also ride along with the cell machinery itself — modifying parts of it for their own benefit, of course. Apicomplexans and microsporidia, obligate intracellular parasites during at least one [...]

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PsiVid

Monday Music Video: Biotech Support in Song

Life Technologies

During the time I taught laboratory courses here at the University of Illinois in cell and molecular biology (After nearly 20 years of that, I’ve moved to online teaching to give myself more flexibility for science outreach), I would often tell the students, particularly the ones who were considering going into research, that the best [...]

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PsiVid

Monday Music Video: “Ph.Diva and the Mystery Band” – Animation of Life in the Biotech lab

Ph.Diva from Life Technologies' new video!

What do you do when your lab results are perplexing and contradict or add a new element to a finding you thought you already had sewn up? Today’s video shares (and maybe celebrates) that frustration of those who’ve experienced this! Perhaps you recall a very catchy tune and animated video about life in the lab [...]

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PsiVid

Monday Music Video: Ph. Diddy is on the scene! An Animated Music Video for Biotech Lab Work

phdiddy

In the vein of great science music videos created for biotech companies (see my post here and here, with more to come in future posts), a new video, with a very enjoyable tune and extreme familiarity with biotech lab work has emerged from Life Technologies. This video follows new biotech PhD candidate, Arnold Young (aka [...]

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Talking back

Remember It Well: A New Type of On-Switch for Memory

Nicotine enhances the ability to focus and remember. The alkaloid acts in a similar manner to the brain’s own signaling molecule, acetylcholine. It interacts with eponymous receptors on the surface of nerve cells to regulate signaling in the brain. The role of the nicotinic-acetylcholine receptors throughout the central nervous system is so wide-ranging that new [...]

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Talking back

A Robot Helps Listen In on Brain Cell Chatter

Erwin Neher and Bert Sakmann received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1991 for their development of the patch-clamp technique, which records currents coursing through single ion channels in cells. For neuroscientists, one form of this technique  has become the gold standard for probing information about the goings-on inside a cell. It can [...]

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