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Posts Tagged "women"

Absolutely Maybe

Long Overdue: Is the Question of Induction of Labor and Cesarean Section Settled?

Cartoon of pregnancy etiquette for childbirth advice

I used to think there was no question about this. Induction was the prologue to a long, hard labor that often wouldn’t go well. And cesarean section was the (un)natural logical end of that. Simples. In the early 1970s, induction got out of hand - over half of labors in the UK were induced. Then came a [...]

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Absolutely Maybe

A Viewer’s Guide to Mammography Evidence Ping-Pong

Cartoon of woman saying you bet I have questions

You could get a very sore neck watching all the claims and counter-claims about mammography zing back and forth. It’s like a lot of evidence ping-pong matches. There are teams with strongly held opinions at the table, smashing away at opposing arguments based on different interpretations of the same data. Meanwhile, women are being advised [...]

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Absolutely Maybe

“How is it that life gets under our skin?” Introducing Michelle Munyikwa

Picture of Michelle Munyikwa

There don’t seem to be all that many PhD anthropologists who are also physicians. It’s a long, daunting road to get there: 12 years of study to be exact. Counting her Bachelor of Science, Michelle Munyikwa has passed the halfway mark. Why she is deeply committed to this onerous dual track is as fascinating as [...]

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Absolutely Maybe

Inching closer towards a science base for justice

Photo of installation

In a courtroom, the full power of the state comes down on an individual. No one should have to face that on their own. A criminal defense lawyer was making this argument to me after a long day in the court we were both working in. I’d asked him, how could he defend that man? [...]

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Absolutely Maybe

Voices, silence, strength and Judith Lumley: A women in science mentoring tale

Photo of Judith Lumley

It began, as life changes often do, when I bought a book. It was in Sydney and I wrote the year in it: 1982. You know when it feels as though something could have been written just for you? That. I was 21, pregnant and more than a bit scared. The book, Birth Rites, Birth [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

Fitting Room Confidential

“You-know-who would have loved to join us.” “Hah, yeah.” “Well, we might be friendly, but she’ll never be in our inner—” “No, she won’t be anything.” “Well, we might be friends, but not friends-friends.” [Silence] “Look, I’d like to like my brother’s wife—” “She is your sister-in-law!” “But I don’t like her.” – “I can’t [...]

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Bering in Mind

Women Really Are More Socially Aggressive Than Men (With Apologies to Jezebel.com)

Like it or not, men and women evolved different kinds of violent minds

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Guest Blog

Gone in 2013: A Tribute to 10 Remarkable Women in Science

Eleanor Adair Image

Pioneering scientists and engineers are often overlooked in popular retrospectives commemorating the year’s departed. In particular, women in such fields tend to be given short shrift. To counter this regrettable circumstance, I present here a selection of 10 notable women in science who left us in 2013. Each of these individuals contributed greatly to her [...]

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Guest Blog

Engineering Is a Man’s Field: Changing a Stereotype with a Lesson from India

Among rude people, the women are generally degraded; among civilized people they are exalted. —James Mill, The History of British India Two years back, we were putting together a report on the employability (job-readiness) of engineering students in India based on the results of AMCAT, a job-skills test my company and I developed (Aspiring Minds [...]

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Guest Blog

Channeling Ada Lovelace: Chien-Shiung Wu, Courageous Hero of Physics

Linocut of Chien-Shiung Wu

Today marks the 5th Ada Lovelace Day, an annual celebration of women who have made important contributions to the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). The event is named for Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace, who is often credited as the first computer programmer. Since its inception in 2009, Ada Lovelace Day [...]

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Guest Blog

Breaking Brick Stereotypes: LEGO Unveils a Female Scientist

scientist-minifig-sm

It’s 11:47 am on the Sunday before Labor Day, and I’m staking out a LEGO store inside a Byzantine shopping mall on the outskirts of Boston. I am here with a coterie of children and parents, the lot of us waiting impatiently while three LEGO associates in black shirts and khakis make their last-minute preparations [...]

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Image of the Week

Team SciTweeps in Lego-Form

SylivaEarle-lego

Credit: Maia Weinstock Source: Oceanographer Sylvia Earle is a Glamour Woman of the Year by Maia Weinstock on Voices In her post about oceanographer Sylvia Earle getting recognized this month by Glamour magazine for her contributions to science and society, Maia Weinstock included this picture of a custom Lego figurine of Dr. Earle scuba diving. [...]

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Observations

40 Years of Health Care for Women–Including Access to Abortion Services

Supreme Court

Today’s political rhetoric in the U.S. makes it easy to fall into the trap of viewing abortion services as outside the realm of women’s health care—but a recent event in Manhattan belied that logical flaw, just as Scientific American did in an editorial in its May 2012 issue. Abortion services, which can include counseling, pain [...]

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Observations

“Wikithon” Honors Ada Lovelace and Other Women in Science

A Wikipedia edit-a-thon seems like a fitting tribute to the woman many consider to be the first computer programmer. October 16 is Ada Lovelace Day, an annual observation designed to raise awareness of the contributions of women in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) disciplines. Groups in the U.S., U.K., Sweden and India are marking [...]

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Observations

Free Birth Control, Reproductive Services for Women Starting August 1

free birth control preventive services august 1 aca

Since last August, I’ve been counting down the days until my 30th birthday this Wednesday. You see, I’ve got money coming my way—not just in the form of birthday checks from my grandmother and aunts—but an even larger chunk of change, spread out over the entire year. Starting August 1, I, along with millions of [...]

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Observations

Men’s Offices Harbor More Bacteria Than Women’s

office bacteria dirtier men new york

What is the dirtiest thing on your desk? If you work in a typical office, it’s not actually your computer mouse or your keyboard or even your desk. According to a new study, published online May 30 in PLoS ONE, it’s your phone—but your chair’s not far behind. Before you drop that receiver or leap [...]

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Observations

Evolution and Miss USA: Science Role Models Explain Why Evolutionary Biology Is So Important [Video]

Remember the Miss USA pageant earlier this year, when contestants were asked if evolution should be taught in schools? Only two of the them fully supported Darwin; thankfully, the pageant winner was one of them. Recognizing that these young women often serve as role models for teens, and concerned about their lack of awareness of [...]

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Observations

Extra weight around the hips associated with greater cognitive decline in older women

overweight woman who may be at higher risk for dementia

The spare tire many U.S. adults carry around their middles has been linked to a host of health risks, including, some research has found, decreased cognitive ability in men. The relationship between weight and dementia has been controversial, however, and some researchers have had difficulty finding a consistent association between these two health issues—especially in [...]

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Plugged In

How Do We Engage More Women In Energy Issues?

As I’ve written in the past, the energy sector is dominated by men. At meetings and conferences, it’s easy to recognize the lack of women in the room, on panels, and involved in the discussion. But a look the latest poll numbers reveals the gender gap goes well beyond the energy sector itself. Consider: In [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Teen Builds Gateway to the Brain for Girls

Girls run on a brain maze

The Synapse Project “encourages young women to enter the field of neuroscience through information and mentorship,” according to its website. This endeavor, an amalgam of outlets for kids, information for teens and career advice for young women, turns out to be the brainchild of … a child, one keenly interested in the brain. Sixteen-year-old Grace [...]

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Voices

For Female Physicists, Peer Mentoring Can Combat Isolation

Our mentoring network of senior physics faculty at liberal arts institutions. Clockwise from top right: Linda Fritz, Cindy Blaha, Barbara Whitten and Anne Cox.

Women physicists are often isolated at work. Just consider the numbers: 86 percent of American faculty physicists are male; 89 percent of PhD physicists working in the science and engineering industry are male; and it was just in 2012 that the number of physics PhDs earned by women reached even 20 percent. To increase the [...]

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Voices

Latinas in STEM: Making Bright Futures a Reality

Members of the Latinas in STEM Board of Directors (from left to right): Madeline Salazar, Noramay Cadena, Jazlyn Carvajal, Veronica Garcia and Daiana Albarrán Chicas. (Credit: Latinas in STEM)

Editor’s note: During National Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15 to October 15), Ciencia Puerto Rico and Borinqueña are celebrating the work of organizations inspiring, supporting and empowering Latinas in STEM fields. You can read the following post in Spanish here. Latinas have a bright future in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Latina girls love [...]

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Voices

Female Physicists Worldwide Fight Sexist Stereotypes

Three physicists meet at the International Conference on Women in Physics August 5-8, 2014 in Waterloo, Canada.  Credit: Marina Milner-Bolotin/ICWIP

Women in physics tend to be outnumbered by men nearly all over the world. For a few days in early August, however, it didn’t feel that way when I attended the International Conference on Women in Physics in Waterloo, Canada. Hundreds of women from about 50 countries gathered there for talks, posters and brainstorming sessions [...]

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Voices

Gone in 2013: A Tribute to 10 Remarkable Women in Science

Eleanor Adair Image

Pioneering scientists and engineers are often overlooked in popular retrospectives commemorating the year’s departed. In particular, women in such fields tend to be given short shrift. To counter this regrettable circumstance, I present here a selection of 10 notable women in science who left us in 2013. Each of these individuals contributed greatly to her [...]

Keep reading »
Voices

Channeling Ada Lovelace: Chien-Shiung Wu, Courageous Hero of Physics

Linocut of Chien-Shiung Wu

Today marks the 5th Ada Lovelace Day, an annual celebration of women who have made important contributions to the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). The event is named for Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace, who is often credited as the first computer programmer. Since its inception in 2009, Ada Lovelace Day [...]

Keep reading »
Voices

Breaking Brick Stereotypes: LEGO Unveils a Female Scientist

It’s 11:47 am on the Sunday before Labor Day, and I’m staking out a LEGO store inside a Byzantine shopping mall on the outskirts of Boston. I am here with a coterie of children and parents, the lot of us waiting impatiently while three LEGO associates in black shirts and khakis make their last-minute preparations [...]

Keep reading »

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