ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network

Posts Tagged "weather"

Anecdotes from the Archive

A Cycle for all Seasons

So far, the weather this spring has brought us all sorts of dashed hopes, with warm, “normal” days immediately followed by chilly, windy, rainy weeks. Whereas the beginning of this week had many stripping off their winter layers and getting out of the house to enjoy temperatures above 60 and sunshine, the end of the [...]

Keep reading »
Anthropology in Practice

How Do You Stay Warm When You’re Homeless?

CC, Photo by Vinh-Luan Luu. Click on image for license and information.

When the temperature drops during the winter months, it’s not uncommon to see articles about how to help the homeless. The advice is generally the same: call a city hotline and a special team will be dispatched or consider donating warm weather clothing—and you should of course do both of these things if you know [...]

Keep reading »
Anthropology in Practice

Editor’s Selection: Excavations, Hurricanes, and Bonobos

This week you’ll want to be sure you check out: Reporting live from Rome, Katy Myers discusses some of the challenges with excavating inside urn—and what constitutes a person—at Bones Don’t Lie. At Inkfish, Elizabeth Preston makes a connection between naming practices and popular words—like violent weather systems. At Evoanth, Adam Benton delves into what [...]

Keep reading »
Anthropology in Practice

Editor’s Selections: Eggs, Flimsy houses, Summer spending, and Fingerprints

Featured this week in my ResearchBlogging.org column: At Powered by Osteons, Kristina Killgrove has a fantastic seasonal post up on the symbolism of eggs and their role in burials. At Gambler’s House, teofilo clears up usage of the word “flimsy” in the context of Mississippian houses by highlighting an interesting bias that the word contributes. [...]

Keep reading »
Anthropology in Practice

The Truth in Pictures: Disasters in the Digital Age

irene_amo_2011236_lrg

For two days Hurricane Irene pounded the coast of the Eastern United States. Though she was ultimately downgraded to a tropical storm, the damage from flooding and downed branches left no doubt as to the power she commanded: washed out roads and rail lines, flooded homes, and widespread power failures left millions trying to pick [...]

Keep reading »
Expeditions

Neutrinos On Ice: The Journey South

View of Antarctica from the C-17 airplane. (Credit: Katie Mulrey)

Editor’s Note: Welcome to ANITA, the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna! From October to December, Katie Mulrey is traveling with the ANITA collaboration to Antarctica to build and launch ANITA III, a scientific balloon that uses the entire continent of Antarctica for neutrino and cosmic ray detection. This is the second installment in a series, “Neutrinos on Ice,” documenting that [...]

Keep reading »
Extinction Countdown

Rare Success: Critically Endangered Gharial Crocodiles Have Record Hatching Year

gharial

This week’s blackouts in India have been blamed at least in part on the lack of rain during the annual monsoon season, which hindered hydropower production and increased the demand for electricity for use in agricultural irrigation. But the unusually dry year has also had at least one positive effect: it has helped to boost [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

How to stop a hurricane (good luck, by the way)

As another hurricane season passes, I’m disappointed I didn’t hear Bill Gates resound with last year’s grand (yet perhaps logistically impossible) idea to dump tons of cold water in the path of moving twisters like Karl, Danielle, Lisa, and Tomas. Maybe Steve Jobs is plotting a more hip idea for 2011… Despite a tech mogul’s [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

1 Hurricane Is Enough to Ruin Your Year

gowanus-canal-flood

GOWANUS—The surge of sewer water, toxic sludge and “Brooklyn whitefish” (aka condoms) stopped one short block away from my house back on the long night of October 29, 2012. Thanks to Hurricane Sandy coming ashore at high tide, my little brick rowhouse in this late industrial neighborhood of Brooklyn was only spared inundation by the [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Wind Turbines Generate “Upside-Down” Lightning [Video]

image of lightning emanating off of several wind turbine blades

The turning blades can actually help spark lightning strikes, potentially incapacitating wind turbines

Keep reading »
Observations

“Team Climate” Gets Sochi Athletes All Abuzz about Climate Change

Members of Team Climate pose with American Olympian Kyle Tress Credit: Courtesy Taylor Rees / Team Climate

This blog appears in the In-Depth Report Science at the Sochi Olympics Climate change poses a well-documented threat to ecosystems and human populations worldwide. But as the inexorable warming trend continues, it’s also endangering the future of winter sports. In a new report published in January by the University of Waterloo, researchers analyzed the suitability [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Climate Change Future Suggested by Looking Back 4 Million Years [Video]

The last time the Earth enjoyed greenhouse gas levels like those of today was roughly 4 million years ago, during an era known as the Pliocene. The extra heat of average temperatures as much as 4 degrees Celsius warmer turned the tropical oceans into a nice warm pool of bathwater, as noted by new research [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Cassini Spacecraft Reveals Unprecedented Saturn Storm

Saturn storm, 2011

Just as regions of our planet have monsoon season, or tornado season, so too does Saturn have its own stormy season. Once every Saturn year or so—which corresponds to roughly 30 Earth years—a giant, churning storm works its way through the clouds of Saturn’s northern hemisphere, sometimes encircling the entire planet like a belt. Lasting [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

New U.S. Commission Would Try to Improve Weather Forecasting

UCAR president Thomas Bogdan leads the movement to form a U.S. Weather Commission. Photo by Carlye Calvin Despite the ever-present caveat that predicting the weather is a difficult and inexact science, it seems that forecasts have been getting better and better. Yet some leaders in meteorology say continued improvement is not guaranteed and could even [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

The Science of Hurricane Sandy–Live Blog

birke

Welcome to Scientific American‘s Science of Sandy live blog where we are posting continuous updates on the storm and its aftermath, and answering your questions. If you have pictures, video, audio or questions about this tropical cyclone (categorized as a hurricane and a tropical storm at various times in its progress)—share them with us at sciamsandy@gmail.com, [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Government Recommendation for Early Summer Heat Wave: Water, Rest, Shade

sun-with-lens-flare

Hot weather is more than uncomfortable; it’s a killer. In fact, heat is the number one weather-related cause of death in the U.S. In an average year, heat kills more people than floods, hurricanes, lightning and tornadoes combined, according to the National Weather Service. And this year is going to get hotter than normal. “Most [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Soot May Help Shift Tropics North

tropics

Soot may be responsible for the tropics expanding north, according to an analysis involving multiple computer models of the climate. By absorbing sunlight and trapping extra heat in the atmosphere, the tiny, black particles may be helping the poleward march of tropical conditions. The research will be published in Nature on May 17. (Scientific American [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Careful out there! Snow shoveling involved in more than 10,000 U.S. hospital visits annually

Man shoveling snow

The winter of 2010–2011 has been a good one for sledding and snowball fights, as snowstorms have dusted the U.S. from Georgia to New England to the Pacific Northwest. And Tuesday is no exception, with snowstorms forecast for much of the northern U.S. But good news for snow lovers is not always good news for [...]

Keep reading »
Plugged In

Why Naming this Winter Storm Leon is a Great Thing

So the winter storm that has half the South obsessively checking its phones for NWS updates or Weather Underground forecasts has a name. It is called Leon, and it got that name from the Weather Channel, which is now naming winter storms for the exact same reason that agencies name hurricanes: it makes them easier [...]

Keep reading »
Plugged In

Get Used to It

Today’s suggestion? Get used to it. Days of unspeakable heat? The heat taking the usual storm systems and turning them excessively violent? Lack of investment in infrastructure making recovery from those storms lengthy and piecemeal? Check, check, and check. Remember the “Snowstorm of 88” narratives we all grew up listening to? The next generation of [...]

Keep reading »
Roots of Unity

The Most Breathtaking Video of the Weather You’ll Watch This Week

Last Monday, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released a video of the past 10 years of weather in the Americas. The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite GOES-12, which had monitored the weather in North and South America since April 2003, was retired on August 16. This video shows one photo a day from the [...]

Keep reading »
Talking back

Science Lesson During Sandy: Scary Pimples

Throughout Sandy, I was cooped up in my apartment in northern Manhattan with my son Benjamin, who was studying for a medical school exam on the cranial nerves. I drilled him through endless lists, ocularmotor nerve (cranial III),  hypoglossal (cranial XII), and so on. Then he volunteered a medical factoid that I had never heard [...]

Keep reading »

More from Scientific American

Scientific American Holiday Sale

Black Friday/Cyber Monday Blow-Out Sale

Enter code:
HOLIDAY 2014
at checkout

Get 20% off now! >

X

Email this Article

X