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Posts Tagged "temperature"

Observations

Found: The Coldest Place on Earth

Thermometer 277x277

The record had stood for nearly 30 years: minus 128.6 degrees F (-89.2 ˚C), recorded a few meters above the ground at the Russian Vostok Research Station in East Antarctica. It was the coldest temperature ever sensed on Earth. Not any more. Researchers from the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colo., announced [...]

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Observations

“Brain Freeze” Might Help Solve Migraine Mysteries

brain freeze headache migraines

Eager eaters know that gulping a Slurpee or inhaling a sundae can cause that brief seizing sensation known in the not-so-technical literature as “brain freeze” or “ice cream headache.” Just what causes this common cautionary condition has remained mysterious to sufferers and scientists alike (not that the two categories need remain mutually exclusive). A new [...]

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Observations

How Long Could Cruise Ship Crash Victims Survive in Cold Waters?

costa concordia sinking

Rescue efforts were called off earlier today in the aftermath of a Costa Concordia shipwreck on rocks off the coast of Italy three days ago. Six of the cruise liner’s 4,200 passengers and crewmembers have been reported dead, so far, and another 15 or more remain missing. As lifeboats filled up and malfunctioned and rescue [...]

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Observations

Fire hydrant hydration: How to cool off responsibly

When a summer heat wave engulfs New York City, people seek the soothing embrace of water in whatever way they can: they swarm the neighborhood swimming pool; they visit the beach at Coney Island; they take multiple showers. People also tap into the city’s water supply through some of its most vulnerable access points: fire [...]

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Octopus Chronicles

Octopuses Survive Sub-Zero Temps Thanks to Specialized Blue Blood

octopus blue blood

Octopuses’ oddities run deep—right down to their blue-hued blood. And new research shows how genetic alterations in this odd-colored blood have helped the octopus colonize the world’s wide oceans—from the deep, freezing Antarctic to the warm equatorial tropics. The iron-based protein (hemoglobin) that carries oxygen in the blood for us red-blooded vertebrates becomes ineffective when [...]

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