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"physics"186 articles archived since 1845

Strings, Geometry, and the Ultimate Reality: The Debate

Strings, Geometry, and the Ultimate Reality: The Debate

Can strings be the ultimate constituents of the universe–more fundamental than matter or energy, and even than space or time? If they’re not made of matter or energy, what are they, then?

July 30, 2011 — Davide Castelvecchi
The Fingerprints the Higgs Leaves Behind

The Fingerprints the Higgs Leaves Behind

Tomorrow, the Nobel prize in physics will most likely be awarded to Peter Higgs and Francois Englert. Along with other researchers, the two physicists are credited with the 1964 introduction of the then-theoretical Higgs field—a fluid that permeates every corner of the universe and gives each particle a distinct mass.

October 7, 2013 — Rachel Feltman
Physics Week in Review: April 18, 2015

Physics Week in Review: April 18, 2015

In honor of Tax Day in the US, here is a piece on the IRS’s Favorite Mathematical Law: Armed with Benford’s law, “the IRS can sniff out falsified returns just by looking at the first digit of numbers on taxpayers' forms.” So, beware.

April 18, 2015 — Jennifer Ouellette

When Your Co-Author Is a Monstrous Ass

Who hasn't worked with a disagreeable person—and in the world of science publishing, authored a paper with one?  That wasn't exactly what went through the mind of William Hoover, a physicist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, when he included an Italian co-author to his 1987 paper.

April 1, 2015 — Philip Yam

New Dark Matter Map Confirms Current Theories

The American Physical Society is holding its annual April Meeting at the moment in Baltimore, Maryland, and one of the highlights, research-wise, comes to us courtesy of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) collaboration.

April 13, 2015 — Jennifer Ouellette

Physics Week in Review: November 1, 2014

Hope everyone enjoyed their Halloween festivities. Here’s a few other related links: The ghostly glow of St. Elmo’s fire: it works the same way that a neon light glows.  The Levitating Halloween Pumpkin with a superconductor inside.  Bonus: More Conceptual Physics Halloween Costumes.This year, go out as The Holographic Principle!

November 1, 2014 — Jennifer Ouellette
Physics Week in Review: August 16, 2014

Physics Week in Review: August 16, 2014

This week on Virtually Speaking Science, I chatted with astrophysicist Katie Freese, author of a new book, The Cosmic Cocktail: Three Parts Dark Matter.

August 16, 2014 — Jennifer Ouellette
Manh(a)ttan Recap: An Appetite for Self-Destruction [SPOILERS]

Manh(a)ttan Recap: An Appetite for Self-Destruction [SPOILERS]

The residents of the Los Alamos base camp receive a special visitor in this week’s episode of Manh(a)ttan — none other than Niels Bohr, he of the infamous model of the atom and one of the unquestioned giants of 20th century physics.

August 18, 2014 — Jennifer Ouellette

Physics Week in Review: August 2, 2014

Looking for a few good popular math books? In the latest New York Times Book Review, I look at five terrific recent ones: Jordan Ellenberg's How Not to Be Wrong, David J.

August 2, 2014 — Jennifer Ouellette
Physics Week in Review: August 9, 2014

Physics Week in Review: August 9, 2014

The big news in space science this week: the Rosetta spacecraft catches its comet! Here’s what comes next. Why does it take 10 years to catch a comet?

August 9, 2014 — Jennifer Ouellette
Manh(a)ttan Recap: The Human Cost of Wartime Scientific Progress [SPOILERS]

Manh(a)ttan Recap: The Human Cost of Wartime Scientific Progress [SPOILERS]

Last week’s episode of Manh(a)ttan closed with a bombshell — the shooting of physicist Sid Liao, who was being interrogated on suspicion of leaking classified documents — and as expected, this week’s episode (“The Hive”) dealt with the fallout from that cataclysmic event, both personally and professionally.

August 13, 2014 — Jennifer Ouellette

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