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Posts Tagged "open access"

@ScientificAmerican

A New Way to Share Articles—and Help Advance Science

ReadCube enables content sharing from nature.com

Paging through some old Scientific American scrapbooks recently, I found this gem from Gerard Piel, a past publisher, in a 1958 article: “Science moves forward in little jumps with small accretions to the total body of knowledge. But its progress is motivated at every step by the larger questions in which all men have a [...]

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Food Matters

The Microbes in Your Kitchen (Or in your Starbucks mocha)

Graph of microbial diversity in 3 different diets

I can’t write an intro better than this: Far more attention has been paid to the microbes in our feces than the microbes in our food. Research efforts dedicated to the microbes that we eat have historically been focused on a fairly narrow range of species, namely those which cause disease and those which are [...]

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Illusion Chasers

Happy Birthday PeerJ!

504px-Jan_van_Eyck_059

Tomorrow marks the anniversary of the paradigm-shifting new journal, PeerJ.

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Illusion Chasers

The Evolution of Scientific Dissemination: PeerJ Rises

PeerJ is the next evolution of the journal. It’s open access, but instead of charging the authors an arm and a leg, it’s relatively cheap to publish

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Observations

Science and the Public Parlay: Come a Little Bit Closer

BOSTON—Rarer than hen’s teeth is a bill in Congress that has bipartisan support. But such legislation exists, and if passed would open up a semi-secret world. The law—the Fair Access to Science and Technology Research (FASTR) Act—would ensure that research articles based on taxpayer-supported projects are freely available online for the public to read. FASTR [...]

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Observations

CT Scans Reveal Early Human Fossils inside Rock

Two Australopithecus sediba skeletons from Malapa

Readers of this blog may have noticed that I’m obsessed with a recently discovered member of the human family tree: the nearly two million-year-old Australopithecus sediba, discovered at a site called Malapa near Johannesburg.  There are several reasons for this fixation. For one thing it’s new—it isn’t every day that a previously unknown human relative [...]

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Observations

Could a Renewed Push for Access to Fossil Data Finally Topple Paleoanthropology’s Culture of Secrecy?

sharing fossil casts

In a hotel ballroom in Portland, Or., this past April, the tables were laid not with silverware and china, but replicas of some of the most important human fossils in the world. Seasoned paleoanthropologists and graduate students alike milled among them, pausing to examine a cutmarked Neandertal skull from Croatia, the bizarre foot bones of [...]

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