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Posts Tagged "nanotechnology"

Critical Opalescence

Quantum Horse Races and Crystals of Light

I’d heard of quantum dice, quantum poker, quantum roulette, and even quantum Russian roulette, but a quantum horse race? I learned about this surreal game of chance last December during a symposium at the Centre for Quantum Technologies in Singapore. Start with a row of rubidium atoms, place your bets, let ʼem go, and measure [...]

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Observations

IBM Movie Does Claymation–in Atomic Scale [Video]

ibm,atom,microscope,film,Guinness

What is the “final frontier”? Star Trek fans will tell you it’s space. Filmmaker/aquanaut James Cameron will tell you it’s the ocean’s depths. IBM, however, is thinking much smaller. The company’s research division on Wednesday released a stop-motion movie whose main character is a stick figure only a few atoms in size. “A Boy and [...]

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Observations

Nanopowder on Your Doughnuts: Should You Worry?

powdered-donuts

There are nano-sized particles in your food. Does this make you nervous? A new report from an environmental health group, As You Sow, raises concern about nanoparticles in some popular sweets. The group says it found particles of titanium dioxide less than 10 nanometers in size in the powdered sugar coating on donuts from Dunkin’ [...]

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Observations

Nanotubes Turn Heat into Firepower

One of the biggest barriers to advances in nanotechnology has manipulating objects at such a small scale. Scientists can make balls, rods and tubes that are only billionths of a meter in size—and have developed techniques to get them to self assemble in different patterns—but tweaking the structure of individual nano-scale particles without breaking them [...]

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Observations

Programmable Nanomedicine Cancer Treatment Shrinks Human Tumors

cancer cell

Chemotherapy treatment for cancer is a nasty process. Doctors must try to give patients just enough of the toxic drugs to kill off cancer cells without doing too much harm to the rest of the body’s healthy tissues, a balancing act that, even if successful, can nevertheless cause horrible side effects. But what if you [...]

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Observations

Nanoscale Car Built with Four-Wheel Drive

Small cars are in vogue, thanks to rising fuel costs and environmental concerns. But the Fiats and Smart Cars of the world have nothing on the new four-wheeler developed by European researchers. Netherlands-based researchers Tibor Kudernac of Twente University and Nopporn Ruangsupapichat of the University of Groningen and their colleagues have engineered a single molecule [...]

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Observations

Wrinkles Rankle Graphene

graphene,x-ray,Buffalo

The 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics raised the profile of graphene—a super strong one-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal pattern with countless potential commercial applications. The material can conduct heat and electricity extremely well while also being transparent and highly flexible, making it an ideal candidate for improving fuel cells, electronics [...]

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Observations

Heady days of nanotech funding behind it, the U.S. faces big challenges

Nanotechnology, stimulus

Nearly a decade after the U.S. launched its National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI), the program’s $12 billion in funding has helped place the country at the head of the pack regarding the development of science and technology measured in billionths of meters. Yet, despite the U.S.’s unrivaled adeptness at patenting nanotech inventions, the country’s lackluster track [...]

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Observations

Nanomovies: Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

The movies don’t have nearly as much interpersonal drama as Avatar, but in these the actors are nanoscopic, directed by the laws of physics operating at the nanoscale. They were filmed using a new kind of electron microscopy. The electron microscope has long been a workhorse for examining all manner of objects and materials at [...]

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Observations

Charge of the light brigade: How quantum dots may improve solar cells

Photovoltaic cells remain woefully inefficient at converting sunlight into electricity. Although layered cells composed of various elements can convert more than 40 percent of (lens-concentrated) sunlight into electricity, more simple semiconducting materials such as silicon hover around 20 percent when mass-produced. And, at best, such cells could convert only a third of incoming sunlight due [...]

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Observations

The 2010 Kavli Prizes honors eight scientists in astrophysics, nanotech and neuroscience

Eight scientists will share three million-dollar Kavli Prizes for their contributions in the fields of astrophysics, nanoscience and neuroscience. The announcement was made today in Oslo, Norway, by Nils Christian Stenseth, president of the Nor­wegian Academy of Science and Letters, and broadcast live at the opening of the World Science Festival in New York City. [...]

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Talking back

Harvard’s Whitesides Gives Brilliant Critique of Mammoth U.S. Brain Project

The Obama administration’s Big Brain project—$100 million for a map of some sort of what lies beneath the skull—has captured the attention of the entire field of neuroscience. The magnitude of the cash infusion can’t help but draw notice, eliciting both huzzahs mixed with gripes that the whole effort might sap support for other perhaps [...]

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