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Posts Tagged "microscopy"

Compound Eye

A more realistic focus-stack

Modified by CombineZP

Why is this beetle so crisp? The clarity results from the image being not a single photograph but a composite. I took 50 exposures at different focal depths and merged them in a file sharp enough to cut diamonds. This extra-clean look is increasingly common, and for a reason. Digital cameras and focus-stacking software are [...]

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Compound Eye

What DNA actually looks like

This blog often covers small things: insects, spiders, slime molds and so on. In the scheme of biology, though, the usual fare here is pretty big. In contrast, here is something truly small- the first high-contrast microscope image of an isolated molecule bundle of DNA: Researchers at the Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia strung a molecule [...]

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Compound Eye

Nikon Announces Winners of 2012 Small World Competition

photo_by_Peters_Taylor1f

It’s a happy day for those of us who appreciate the small things! Nikon has announced the 2012 winners of its venerable Small World Photomicrography Competition. The prestigious contest, now in its 38th year, ranks images captured with various methods of microscopy. And I must say, the galleries are stunning! Go visit: Nikon Small World [...]

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Expeditions

MIT Neurotech: Imaging Neurons Deep Within a Living Brain

Two-photon microscopy image of a neuron published in PNAS by Holbro N et al. (2009)

It’s a Saturday and you’re on vacation, looking out over the beautiful blue Pacific Ocean from the windy cliffs of Big Sur. You breathe in cool, fresh salty air. A thunderous pummel of great waves stirs neural networks in your brain and suddenly you find yourself wondering what lies submerged beneath the foaming sea. Seals [...]

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Observations

3-D Imaging of Microfossils Muddies Case for Early Animal Embryos [Video]

The proverbial primordial soup from which our earliest, multi-cellular ancestors emerged was presumably seething with many much simpler, single-celled organisms. Finding the first indications of evolution into more advanced, embryonic development has proved difficult, however, both because of the organisms’ small size and soft structures. A famous collection of minute 570-million-year-old fossils, from the Doushantuo [...]

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Observations

Nanoscale imaging technique meets 3-D moviemaking

ET imaging in short time steps

Three-dimensional movies are everywhere these days, and the novelty is poised to become a big-screen mainstay. Now the field of microscopy is getting into the act, too, but the end product is very different from 3-D movies such as Toy Story 3 or Avatar. Oh-Hoon Kwon and Ahmed Zewail of the California Institute of Technology [...]

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Observations

Scientists observe protein folding in living cells for the first time

protein folding in vivo cells

Even in sleep, the human body is rarely still—and within it, there is the constant motion of the contents of our cells and the proteins within. Until now, scientists have had to estimate the speed of complex but common actions such as protein folding (which turns an unorganized polypeptide strand into a complex and useful [...]

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The Ocelloid

Random image:

To keep things alive while I’m at an awesome conference (that you should follow on twitter, see previous post), let’s have a random image of tardigrade (water-bear) guts; the brown stuff is semi-digested food. See, I go away, and animals start encroaching on my blog…

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The Ocelloid

Pond water microforay: amoebae gone wild

I have a confession to make — even though I work with ciliates at the moment, I have a bit of an unhealthy obsession with amoebae. I love them to the point that I get offended whenever anyone within earshot insults them as ‘formless’ or ‘shapeless blobs’. Amoebae might be fairly squishy, but one cannot [...]

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The Ocelloid

Pond water ‘microforay’: amoeba and ciliate sex gone horribly wrong

Am back, I hope! Don’t pay any attention to the dust… “What dust?” Exactly. It took a while, but after finally attaining the necessary potentially-overpriced fancy pieces of glass, the lab scope can now take acceptable DIC images. Meaning yours truly can once again slightly misappropriate lab resources during strange hours of the night and [...]

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