ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network

Posts Tagged "lindau"

Basic Space

Happy Birthday Higgs Boson!

Lindau Higgs press conference

A year ago today I was at the 62nd Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in Germany. Miles away in Geneva, Switzerland, scientists were getting ready to tell the gathering media about a discovery that would change physics forever. It was Higgs day. It was great to be in Lindau then, surrounded by Nobel laureates and young [...]

Keep reading »
Basic Space

How most of the universe was lost

When Brian Schmidt got his PhD in astrophysics in 1993, he was one of less than a handful of people that year that graduated with a thesis on supernovae. Five years later, still working on exploding stars, he would be part of one of two teams that independently discovered that the universe was not only [...]

Keep reading »
Basic Space

Heather Gray: chaotic starts and Higgs excitement #lnlm12

Heather Gray, a researcher working on the ATLAS experiment at CERN, was at this year’s Lindau meeting. I spoke to her over email before it started to find out about her expectations, and afterwards she told me about her impressions of the meeting and what it was like to watch the announcement from CERN with [...]

Keep reading »
Basic Space

Sir Harold Kroto: Science is “lost in translation” #lnlm12

Harry Kroto during the interview. Credit: Juan Garcia-Bellido

If you don’t know English, you can still understand Shakespeare’s stories, Sir Harold Kroto told me after his lecture at Lindau on Thursday. But, crucially, “you cannot understand his use of language, because language is a cultural thing – and the culture is lost in translation.” ‘Lost in translation’ was the title of Kroto’s lecture [...]

Keep reading »
Basic Space

Tricking nature to give up its secrets #lnlm12

By their very nature, those discoveries that most change the way we think about nature cannot be anticipated This was Douglas Osheroff’s claim at the start of his lecture on Wednesday morning, where he promised to tell the young researchers at Lindau “how advances in science are made”. In his talk Osheroff offered five things [...]

Keep reading »
Basic Space

Master class with Albert Fert: the future of electronics #lnlm12

Skyrmion crystal observed by Lorentz transmission electron microscopy. Credit: {link url="http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v465/n7300/full/nature09124.html"}Nature{/link}

“From a dream with atoms and spins and electrons dancing around, to a device that we use in our daily life” is how Albert Fert described the link between fundamental physics and its applications. His talk during the Tuesday morning session at Lindau focused on how fundamental research could be spun off into new electronic [...]

Keep reading »
Basic Space

Researcher profile: Heather Gray on life at Cern #lnlm12

Heather Gray, originally from South Africa and currently working at CERN, is one of the attendees producing a video diary to document her time at the Lindau meeting this year. I caught up with her over email just before the start of the meeting to find out what a day’s work at CERN is really like [...]

Keep reading »
Basic Space

Looking forward to Lindau

Ariel view of Lindau Island. Credit: {link url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Lindau_Insel_Luftbild3.jpg}Edda Praefcke{/link}

In less than two weeks time I’ll be boarding a plane from London to Zurich and then zipping across the Swiss-German border to Lindau by train. I’m pretty excited about it – it will be the first time I’ve stepped foot outside of the UK since before I started my Physics degree five years ago, [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

“Hey, You Are Good—Why Are You Not a Physicist?”

Nobel Laureate Steven Chu with young researcher Bettina Keller. Photo by Kathleen Raven

On the last day of the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, the prize winners, young researchers and journalists mingled together on a boat ride to Mainau Island. During this two-hour ride, I witnessed a conversation take place between young researcher Bettina Keller and Nobel Laureate Steven Chu (Nobel Prize in Physics, 1997). The brief conversation covered [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Ada Yonath and the Female Question

A chocolate ribosome-shaped cake baked by a female researcher in Yonath's lab. Photo by Kathleen Raven

Just minutes after Ada Yonath learned of her shared Nobel Prize in Chemistry for work on the ribosome in October 2009, she answered another phone call. This time Adam Smith, editor-in-chief of the Nobel Prize Foundation, spoke crisply on the other line, asking her questions for a short, recorded phone interview, per tradition. Recently I [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Energy Storage, Rare Metals and the Next Ice Age

Four Nobel Laureates discussed a wide range of energy storage and conversion problems and possible solutions on Wednesday. Photo by Kathleen Raven

The holy grail of energy storage may lie in chemical bonds, but a process for making this happen remains unknown. All of the Nobel Laureates who weighed in Wednesday on a chemical energy conversion panel agreed on this much. “Replacement of liquid fossil fuels is still in far reach,” said moderator Wolfgang Lubitz, director of [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Imaging the Near Invisible with TEM: A Master Class

A slide from Mehtap Özaslan’s presentation. She is with the Paul Scherrer Institute in Germany. Photo by Kathleen Raven

Though nanometer-level imaging has come far with transmission electron microscopy, Nobel Laureate Dan Shechtman (Nobel Prize 2011, Chemistry) warned his master class audience on Tuesday that today’s images will seem primitive a few years in the future. For now, the five students—four females and one male—presented research at the 63rd Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting that [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Chemistry and Physics: One Needs the Other

Wineland’s presentation slide on “alumina gold trap.” Photo by Kathleen Raven

“Quantum theory has opened to us the microscopic world of particles, atoms and photons,” explained Nobel Laureate Serge Haroche, who shared the 2012 Nobel Prize in physics with David Wineland. In this sentence, Haroche answered why two physicists certainly belong onstage at the 63rd Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting for chemistry. Haroche’s talk, called ‘Controlling Photons [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Cataloguing the Impact of Lindau Meetings

Lindau09  001

Prestigious achievements like the Nobel Prize create powerful networks. Within these networks, scientists share ideas, researchers collaborate with resources and writers cover stories. How can we monitor and measure the impact of the Lindau meetings? This is a question also for gatherings like the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, businesses like Google and institutions [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Lindau 2013: Videos with a Personality, Flow and Message

Edson Filho

After learning about the Nobel Laureate Meeting in Lindau through an online science video collection, Edson Filho will now be behind the camera making films himself as a video blogger at this year’s meeting. His path to this point — like his research in sport and exercise psychology — can be summed up in a [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Behind the Greatest Experiments: Basic Research

MaxPlanck-resized-byKathleenRaven

Insight must precede application.  — Max Planck, Nobel Prize in Physics, 1918 One summer day a young Martin Chalfie walked out of a lab after a particularly frustrating experiment. He thought—quite erroneously—that the life of a scientist was not for him. After teaching high school chemistry for some years, he gave it one more try. [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Lindau Nobel Meeting–the Future of Global Health

What can be done about global health? It’s the question on everyone’s minds following Peter Agre’s moving talk on malaria ‘without borders’ earlier in the week and Christian De Duve handing the baton of all the world’s challenges to the young researchers in the last lecture: "Our generation has made a mess of it… the future [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Lindau Nobel Meeting–The Future of Biomedicine

The future of medicine is contained in "The Four P’s": Personalised, Predictive, Preventative, and Participatory. Aaron Ciechanover, speaking on a panel on the future of biomedicine at the Lindau meeting, explains: "We may have the ability to profile patients before they get sick, therefore we may have the ability to predict diseases – and also ‘preventative’ [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

The Blurry Line between Small and Quantum Small

The late physicist Erwin Schrodinger was probably relieved to know that flesh and blood cats are too big to behave according to the laws of quantum physics. His intellectual heirs, however, no longer have that luxury. The line between the large and the small is not so clear cut as it was in Schrodinger’s day. [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

How to Succeed in Science: Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, Day 4

On the last day of formal plenary talks at the 62nd Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, the laureates dispensed several lessons while describing their research experiences to the attending students, from developing expertise to enduring in the face of doubt. (You can read all our coverage of the Lindau meeting this week, including the “30 under [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

The Higgs, Sterile Neutrinos and Spintronics: Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, Day 2

With excitement building about an announcement due tomorrow from scientists working at the Large Hadron Collider, today’s Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting talks kicked off with the Higgs, explored some mysterious anomalies with neutrinos and looked forward to some practical applications of spintronics coming soon in information and communication technologies. (You can read all our coverage [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Virologist Advocates Vaccinating Only Boys for HPV to Prevent Cervical Cancer

LINDAU, Germany—A vaccine to prevent infections of cancer-causing human papilloma virus (HPV) is currently approved for use in the U.S. in boys and girls and in the U.K. in girls. The U.S. public health campaign focuses on vaccinating girls. The virologist who won a Nobel Prize for confirming that HPV causes cervical cancer supports educational [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Bill Gates Urges Young Scientists to Consider the “Needs of the Poorest”

Bill Gates

LINDAU, Germany—Microsoft founder Bill Gates thrilled a crowd of 566 young researchers from 77 countries gathered here June 26 for the opening ceremony of the 61st Meeting of Nobel Laureates, and he wasted no time in telling them what to do. His advice was borne of his own trajectory from technologist to billionaire to philanthropist. [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

So you want to be a scientist

LINDAU, Germany—Play hard. Learn to explain what you do to people who know nothing about science. Put your collaborators’ needs first. A Thursday panel here at the 60th annual Nobel Laureate Lectures at Lindau gave young scientists tips—sometimes counterintuitive—about what it takes to succeed. Play Hard. “I really don’t think you have to work hard,” [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

The coming shortage of helium

LINDAU, Germany—Quick: What do MRI machines, rockets, fiber optics, LCDs, food production and welding have in common? They all require the inert, or noble, gas helium for their use or at some stage of their production. And that helium essentially could be gone in less than three decades, Robert C. Richardson, winner, along with Douglas [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

How did life begin on Earth?

LINDAU, Germany—What steps led to the origin of life on Earth? Scientists may be zeroing in on that most profound of questions. “We’ve gone a long way to showing” the processes that “set the stage” for cellular life on Earth, Jack Szostak said Tuesday here in his talk at the 60th annual Nobel Laureate Lectures [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

What happens when coal is gone?

LINDAU, Germany–What’s the best way to address a politically charged topic such as the future of energy? Remove the politics. “We’re going to skip over the politics,” Robert P. Laughlin, who won a Nobel Prize for physics in 1998, told a rapt audience of young scientists and others here at the 60th annual Nobel Laureate [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

60th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting opens

LINDAU, Germany–An astronomer once told me about how he was often miserable growing up as the picked-on nerd. Nobody, he said, had ever told him the big secret: that if you stick with science, you win. You will have a fascinating career, meet and collaborate with intelligent and passionate people, and even get to travel [...]

Keep reading »

More from Scientific American

Scientific American MIND iPad

Give a Gift & Get a Gift - Free!

Give a 1 year subscription as low as $14.99

Subscribe Now >>

X

Email this Article

X