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Posts Tagged "Hubble"

Life, Unbounded

Jupiter’s Moons Ascending

hs-2015-05-b-small_web

Some natural phenomena need few words to explain why they’re fascinating. Eclipses, transits, and phases in astronomy tend to fall into that category. Here’s a stunning sequence of images captured by the Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3 showing the triple conjunction and transit of the large Jovian moons Europa, Callisto, and Io over [...]

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Life, Unbounded

Water Erupts Across the Solar System

Europa erupts (Credit: NASA/ESA/K. Retherford/SWRI)

Reading the scientific headlines recently one would be forgiven for thinking that we’re experiencing a bout of interplanetary gastrointestinal distress. First, Saturn’s diminutive moon Enceladus continues to spew what we think are giant sprays of salty water from gnarled creases in its southern icy surface – captured in glorious imagery by the Cassini spacecraft over [...]

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Life, Unbounded

A Galactic Flyby Can Be Deadly, But Beautiful

326 million light years away a galactic encounter destroys a galaxy but creates something lovely (NASA, ESA, Hubble Heritage team, STScI/AURA, Wide Field Camera 3, visible light + near infrared image

Galaxies across the observable universe are engaged in ultra-slow motion interactions with each other, close encounters, flybys, and sometimes collisions. The outcome may be different in every case. Sometimes the presence of a neighboring galaxy’s gravitational pull as it passes by can disturb, or harass, the processes of star and planet formation. In other cases [...]

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Observations

Hubble’s Repairman Reflects on the Telescope’s Legacy

Former NASA astronaut Mike Massimino

Twenty-five years ago, on April 24, 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope soared into orbit. Since then, its great discoveries have been legion, and the story of how it became the most successful and productive astronomical observatory in human history is destined to become legendary. To help commemorate Hubble’s 25th anniversary, Scientific American collaborated with Nature [...]

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Observations

Surprise scar that appeared on Jupiter last year looks to have been an asteroid impact

Jupiter impact scar following July 2009 collision

When a mystery object smacked into Jupiter without warning in July 2009, an event whose aftermath was first spotted by an amateur astronomer in Australia, observers across the globe scrambled to get a look at the planet to figure out just what had happened. Astronomers working on other campaigns at world-class observatories, including one of [...]

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Observations

Astronaut Scott Altman and director Toni Myers talk Hubble 3D

Hubble mission

Back in May 2009, the Hubble Space Telescope got its final tune-up. The seven astronauts of the STS-125 mission flew to Hubble on space shuttle Atlantis, grabbed the observatory with a robotic arm and pulled Hubble into the shuttle’s open payload bay for repair. They then commenced an intensive servicing itinerary that spanned five spacewalks. [...]

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Symbiartic

Alone in the blogiverse: where are all the space-art bloggers?

Eskimo Nebula © Katy Ann Chalmers

Where are all the space-art bloggers?  When Symbiartic was in the planning stages, this was a post I knew I had to write. There are so few I found it at first surprising.  Do the images from the Hubble trump inspiration in painters?  Is interest in space waning compared to say, paleontology? Science inspired art [...]

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Symbiartic

5 Reasons Your Camera Won’t Steal My Job

Illustration of a neuron © Cosmocyte

By far the most common question I get when I tell people that I am a scientific illustrator is one variation (some more tactful than others) of, “They still use illustrators? Why don’t they just photograph everything?” In fact, it’s a great question. Although photography is fantastically impressive and can offer glimpses into worlds both [...]

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