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Posts Tagged "Hubble"

Basic Space

Exoplanet colour confirmed for first time: it’s blue, but not pale — and nothing like Earth

Deep blue dot

Using data from the Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have confirmed that a planet called HD189733b, which orbits a star 63 light years from here, is a deep blue colour. Earth also looks blue from space. But that’s just about the only thing our planet has in common with this one. HD 189773b is a hot [...]

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Basic Space

Missed opportunities: cloudy transits, not-so-fast neutrinos and a spare Hubble or two

The International Space Station had no cloud issues. Credit: NASA

I woke up early on Wednesday morning, half feeling like a kid on Christmas morning, half feeling like I’d rather just stay in bed. While most people in the UK were sound asleep, amateur and professional astronomers alike got up before dawn to witness an astronomical spectacle that won’t happen again until the year 2117: [...]

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Basic Space

CLASH of the Galaxy Clusters

Galaxy cluster MACS 1206 as seen by the Hubble Space Telescope (click for a bigger version). Credit: {link url="http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2011/25/"}NASA, ESA, M. Postman (STScI), and the CLASH Team{/link}

Galaxies do not usually exist alone. They tend to bunch together in small groups, like the Local Group of galaxies in which the Milky Way sits, or larger groups called clusters. This is useful for cosmologists, as it gives them a chance to study one of the most elusive substances in the universe: dark matter. [...]

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Basic Space

The Closest You’ll Ever Get to Being in Space

The entire Orion Nebula as seen by the Hubble Space Telescope in visible light. Credit: {link url="http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2006/01/"}NASA, ESA, M. Robberto (Space Telescope Science Institute/ESA) and the Hubble Space Telescope Orion Treasury Project Team{/link}

Being a student of Imperial College has a few perks. Our campus is on the same road as three of the biggest museums in London: the Natural History Museum, the Victoria and Albert, and the Science Museum. Not that you get much time to visit them when you have days full of lectures, seminars, tutorials [...]

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Life, Unbounded

Water Erupts Across the Solar System

Europa erupts (Credit: NASA/ESA/K. Retherford/SWRI)

Reading the scientific headlines recently one would be forgiven for thinking that we’re experiencing a bout of interplanetary gastrointestinal distress. First, Saturn’s diminutive moon Enceladus continues to spew what we think are giant sprays of salty water from gnarled creases in its southern icy surface – captured in glorious imagery by the Cassini spacecraft over [...]

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Life, Unbounded

A Galactic Flyby Can Be Deadly, But Beautiful

326 million light years away a galactic encounter destroys a galaxy but creates something lovely (NASA, ESA, Hubble Heritage team, STScI/AURA, Wide Field Camera 3, visible light + near infrared image

Galaxies across the observable universe are engaged in ultra-slow motion interactions with each other, close encounters, flybys, and sometimes collisions. The outcome may be different in every case. Sometimes the presence of a neighboring galaxy’s gravitational pull as it passes by can disturb, or harass, the processes of star and planet formation. In other cases [...]

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Observations

Surprise scar that appeared on Jupiter last year looks to have been an asteroid impact

Jupiter impact scar following July 2009 collision

When a mystery object smacked into Jupiter without warning in July 2009, an event whose aftermath was first spotted by an amateur astronomer in Australia, observers across the globe scrambled to get a look at the planet to figure out just what had happened. Astronomers working on other campaigns at world-class observatories, including one of [...]

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Observations

Astronaut Scott Altman and director Toni Myers talk Hubble 3D

Hubble mission

Back in May 2009, the Hubble Space Telescope got its final tune-up. The seven astronauts of the STS-125 mission flew to Hubble on space shuttle Atlantis, grabbed the observatory with a robotic arm and pulled Hubble into the shuttle’s open payload bay for repair. They then commenced an intensive servicing itinerary that spanned five spacewalks. [...]

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Symbiartic

Alone in the blogiverse: where are all the space-art bloggers?

Eskimo Nebula © Katy Ann Chalmers

Where are all the space-art bloggers?  When Symbiartic was in the planning stages, this was a post I knew I had to write. There are so few I found it at first surprising.  Do the images from the Hubble trump inspiration in painters?  Is interest in space waning compared to say, paleontology? Science inspired art [...]

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Symbiartic

5 Reasons Your Camera Won’t Steal My Job

Illustration of a neuron © Cosmocyte

By far the most common question I get when I tell people that I am a scientific illustrator is one variation (some more tactful than others) of, “They still use illustrators? Why don’t they just photograph everything?” In fact, it’s a great question. Although photography is fantastically impressive and can offer glimpses into worlds both [...]

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