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Posts Tagged "habitat"

Extinction Countdown

Sage Grouse and Oil Drilling Can Co-Exist, Says New Report

greater sage grouse

Conservation groups and energy-development companies have been at odds the last few years over an odd, dancing bird called the greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus). These land-based birds live in and rely upon sagebrush habitats in California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. Unfortunately, those habitats have been disappearing [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Sunday Species Snapshot: Alaotran Gentle Lemur

gentle lemur

A primate that lives only in wetlands? That alone makes the Alaotran gentle lemur unique. But this tiny lemur lives in incredibly limited constrained habitat, which continues to shrink around it. Species name: Boy, this one has a lot of names, including the Alaotran gentle lemur, Alaotra reed lemur, Lac Alaotra bamboo lemur and Lake [...]

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Extinction Countdown

World’s Largest Owl Needs Equally Large Trees and Forests (But It’s More Complex Than That)

Blakiston's Fish owl

With a body the size of a small child and a wingspan of up to two meters, the Blakiston’s fish owl (Bubo blakistoni) is the largest owl in the world. It is also one of the rarest, shiest and least studied. But that didn’t stop a team of researchers from the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Habitat Running Out for Rare Primate in Cameroon

Mandrillus leucophaeus

Primates don’t get much more spectacular than the furry, short-tailed, long-faced, pink-rumped monkeys known as drills (Mandrillus leucophaeus). But despite their striking looks, drills—which are closely related to baboons and the even more wildly colored, blue-faced mandrills (M. sphinx)—have not fared well in the wild over the past few decades. Drills have become one of [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Cost to Prevent All Future Extinctions: $11 per Person?

forest owlet

A global effort to prevent all future species extinctions would cost about $80 billion a year, or $11.42 annually from every person on the planet, according to a study published last week in Science. The study, released in conjunction with eleventh meeting of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) currently underway in Hyderabad, India, is [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Okapi Conservation Center Recovering after Militia Attack that Killed 6 People and 14 Animals

okapi

On Sunday, June 24, an armed militia group opened fire on the headquarters of the Okapi Conservation Project (OCP) near the village of Epulu in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). By the time they receded into the forest two days later, six people and 13 of the 14 “ambassador” okapi that lived at [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Cougars Are Returning to the U.S. Midwest after More Than 100 Years

They go by a lot of names: mountain lions, cougars, pumas, catamounts and more. But people living in the Midwest may soon have a new name for these big cats: neighbor. Cougars (Puma concolor) have not lived in Oklahoma, Missouri and other midwestern states since the  beginning of the 20th century. But now the cats [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Good News for Rare Amur Leopards and Tigers in Russia

amur leopard

This blog appears in the In-Depth Report Science at the Sochi Olympics Two of the world’s rarest and most vulnerable cat species have had some good news in the past few weeks. The best of the news items covers the critically endangered Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis), probably the rarest cat species on the planet, [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Critically Endangered Cross River Gorillas May Have More Room to Grow

cross river gorilla

With a population numbering fewer than 300 individuals, Cross River gorillas (Gorilla gorilla diehli) are the rarest and most endangered of the world’s four gorilla subspecies. Although they remain threatened by habitat loss and illegal bushmeat hunting, new research shows the gorillas have a bit more potential habitat to roam, and in fact inhabit a [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Endangered Species Status Sought for ‘Don’t Tread on Me’ Rattlesnakes

I have had two encounters with rattlesnakes over the years. Each time, the snake shook its tail, made some noise, and let me know it didn’t much care for me being so close. I eased my way around, gave the snake some respect, and kept on moving. No problem. Neither of those encounters were with [...]

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Observations

New Toxic Nocturnal Primate Species Discovered

new slow loris species toxic bite primate Borneo

The slow loris shouldn’t be a difficult object of study. For one thing, it’s slow—very slow (think sloth slow). And these small primates, which are unique in possessing a toxic bite to ward off predators, are charismatic due in large part to their compelling, wide-eyed faces. But they are also nocturnal, and they tend to [...]

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Octopus Chronicles

Unusual Offshore Octopods: Does the World’s Largest Octopus Only Have 7 Arms? [Video]

seven-armed octopus biggest octopus

Today we’re returning to the deep to meet an octopus that, at first glance, hardly seems to earn that eight-limbed designation. Its very name sounds like an oxymoron—or a cautionary tale from a fishing accident. But the seven-armed octopus (Haliphron atlanticus) is a real, bonafide octopod—if a little misleading in its appellation. This deep-ocean octopus [...]

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