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"fungi"21 articles archived since 1845

Frog-killing fungus is a skin-loving hybrid

Frog-killing fungus is a skin-loving hybrid

These are not the best of times for amphibians. All around the world, populations of frogs, salamanders and newts are declining. At least 489 species (7.8% of all known amphibians) are nearing extinction.

November 23, 2011 — Lucas Brouwers

Sauerkraut: bacteria making food

Last week my husband needed some jars for cooking purposes. Tesco sell jars for somewhere around £3 each. However they also sell large jars full of sauerkraut for £1 each.

July 26, 2014 — S.E. Gould
Glowing fungi for studying infectious diseases

Glowing fungi for studying infectious diseases

When studying how infections grow and spread it is always helpful to be able to see the organism causing the disease. There are currently a range of microbial and labelling techniques available to view micro-organisms within the cells they infect, and one of the most useful is bioluminescence imaging.

August 3, 2014 — S.E. Gould

The Amazing Mimicry of the Mummy Berry Fungus

Author's note: This is the latest post in the Wonderful Things series. You can read more about this series here. There is a fungus on our planet which is capable of not one, but two audacious and duplicitous acts: it pretends, on separate occasions, to be both to be a flower and a pollen grain, [...]

April 3, 2015 — Jennifer Frazer
Diseases in the wild: the frog apocalypse

Diseases in the wild: the frog apocalypse

The best way to prevent a disease from turning into an epidemic is to closely monitor its development and put systems in place before it starts spreading rapidly through populations.

June 14, 2014 — S.E. Gould
There’s Darwin’s Fungus!

There’s Darwin’s Fungus!

Last winter I wrote a post called “Darwin’s Neon Golf Balls” about a fungus called Cyttaria that Darwin collected during his journey on the Beagle.

October 24, 2013 — Jennifer Frazer
Kawasaki Disease Traced to Winds from Northeast China Carrying Unusual Fungal Load

Kawasaki Disease Traced to Winds from Northeast China Carrying Unusual Fungal Load

In 2012 I wrote a story for Nature about a strange illness called Kawasaki Disease whose cause has eluded scientists for over 50 years. The diseases causes inflammation of the blood vessels in small children that leads to fever, rashes and reddening, and even coronary aneurysms that can cause heart attacks in the young.

May 25, 2014 — Jennifer Frazer
Fighting bacteria with weapons from fungi

Fighting bacteria with weapons from fungi

In order to survive, organisms produce small molecules known as ‘primary metabolites’ which help it to grow, develop and reproduce.

April 19, 2014 — S.E. Gould
How Your Morning Commute Resembles a Fungus

How Your Morning Commute Resembles a Fungus

In many fungi, the DNA storage compartments called nuclei are not prisoners of the cells they reside in, the way they are in animals and plants.

November 20, 2013 — Jennifer Frazer