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Posts Tagged "epa"

Extinction Countdown

Petition filed to protect 404 southeastern U.S. species

Alabama map turtle

The Center for Biological Diversity (CBD) has filed a massive petition to protect 404 freshwater species in the southeastern U.S. The list includes 48 fish, 92 mussels and snails, 92 crayfish and other crustaceans, 82 plants, 13 reptiles (including five map turtles), four mammals, 15 amphibians, 55 insects, and three birds. The species live in [...]

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Food Matters

Fish Feast

three salmon pieces on a chopping board

Families across America are likely snacking on a surplus of turkey, ham and chicken leftover from last week’s holiday meals. But for some Italian-American families, seafood was the protein of choice. Seven different types of seafood, to be exact. In the traditional Southern Italian “Feast of the Seven Fishes,” families partake in at least seven [...]

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Observations

Obama’s Clean Power Plan Means More Gas to Fight Global Warming [Video]

mountaineer-co2-capture-unit

400 PPM: What’s Next for a Warming Planet Concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have reached this level for the first time in millions of years. What does this portend? » If the power plant goes away, so do the jobs, and then the town. That’s the fear in New Haven, West Virginia, home [...]

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Observations

The Answer to Coal Climate Pollution Is Natural Gas and Carbon Capture, EPA Says

mccarthy-sworn-in

The Environmental Protection Agency has new rules for how much carbon dioxide power plants can spew. Designed to ensure that no new plants built in the U.S. can be highly polluting, the regulations would prohibit the dirtiest coal-fired power plants without additional technology to capture and store CO2. The trouble is: hardly any such coal-fired [...]

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Observations

Science Will Protect Us from Climate Change, Obama Says

Science can save us from the next Hurricane Sandy. That’s what President Barack Obama will say today when he releases his Climate Action Plan, during a highly anticipated speech at Georgetown University. The plan, which consists of a long list of actions the executive branch can take with no help or hindrance from Congress, has [...]

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Observations

EPA Nominee Gina McCarthy Stymied by Republican Boycott

When a U.S. president nominates a candidate to take over the top spot at a major government agency such as the Defense Department, at least a few senators—usually from the opposing party—raise some objections, if for no other reason than to show that they will not rubber-stamp anyone the president proposes. But yesterday Republicans boycotted [...]

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Observations

EPA on Keystone XL: Significant Climate Impacts from Tar Sands Pipeline

In a draft assessment of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, consultants for the U.S. State Department judged that building it would have no significant impact on greenhouse gas emissions. Why? Because the analysts assumed the tar sands oil would find a way out with or without the new pipeline. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency does [...]

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Observations

Common Pesticide “Disturbs” the Brains of Children

chemical-spraying-agriculture

Banned for indoor use since 2001, the effects of the common insecticide known as chlorpyrifos can still be found in the brains of young children now approaching puberty. A new study used magnetic imaging to reveal that those children exposed to chlorpyrifos in the womb had persistent changes in their brains throughout childhood. The brains [...]

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Observations

Fracking’s Future in the U.S. Comes Down to Upcoming New York State Decisions

New York State is the key battleground that will determine the future of fracking in the U.S., and January 11, 2012, is a turning point. The date ends the public comment period on proposed state regulations that will govern the process: drilling into deep Marcellus shales, fracturing the rock with water and chemicals to release [...]

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Observations

U.S. Starts National CO2 Permits, Cap and Trade Works, and Other Surprises

thomas-c-ferguson-power plant

The U.S. has begun to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from power plants—quietly, with little fanfare and starting in Texas. The Thomas C. Ferguson Power Plant in Llano County is being modernized with the installation of a combined cycle natural gas-fired turbine for improved efficiency at generating electricity. The refurbished “peaker” plant—so-called because it is fired [...]

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Observations

Are There “Serious Flaws” in the EPA’s Bid to Regulate Greenhouse Gases?

epa-headquarters

Did the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency err when it found in 2009 that greenhouse gases, like carbon dioxide, endanger public health? Based on a new report from the agency’s Inspector General, climate change denier and U.S. Sen. James Inhofe, R-Okla., would like you to think so, trumpeting in a press release headline that the “EPA [...]

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Observations

Smog Levels to Remain Higher than Scientists Suggest Safe for Public Health

houston smog

The Obama administration has withdrawn regulations that would have prevented at least 1,500 deaths per year from unhealthy levels of smog in the air. Citing “regulatory uncertainty and regulatory burden” (read: jobs), the President stated on September 2 that he will not update a 2008 standard until 2013 (read: after the next presidential election, if [...]

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Plugged In

Map Monday: Global Pesticide Scorecard Launched

Levels of pesticide regulation by country/toxin. Image courtesy: Yale EPI.

The prevalence of pesticides and other chemicals may seem like something of a bygone era, one marked by Silent Spring and the Bhopal Disaster, but the grim reality is that they are unfortunately very much around. Whether it is BPA in your water bottle or neonicotinoids decimating bee populations, action has not been uniform. To [...]

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Plugged In

New Greenhouse Gas Rule Will Benefit Both Climate and Health

coalplant

Tomorrow, President Obama is expected to announce a major step in U.S. carbon regulation. Using executive authority, the President will issue a new rule to limit carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants in the United States. This ruling could have many other benefits, including reducing soot, smog, and early-deaths due to repiratory and other [...]

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Plugged In

Market forces have been hurting coal long before the EPA’s CO2 rules

taichi_385

War on coal? Not really. More like climate policy tai chi by the EPA.

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Plugged In

Don’t just blame the EPA – coal exports are down, too

coalbarge_seine_385

It’s important to understand that not all of the bad news for the coal industry is coming by way of the EPA. While the CO2 limits for new coal and gas plants complicates domestic power generation, the global market for U.S. coal is softening. Up until several months ago, many people (myself included) were expecting [...]

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Plugged In

Running the numbers on EPA’s new CO2 regulations: natural gas combined cycle stacks up well

TI-89_385

Existing technology like combined cycle generation could be used to meet EPA’s stricter CO2 emissions limits

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Plugged In

EPA “got it right” on more stringent methane regulations

NG_rig_385

One of the big takeaway from the big UT Austin/Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) methane leakage study released today is emissions rates are actually lower in some parts of the production process than initially thought. For wellheads surveyed as part of the study, two-thirds of the wells had new emissions capture control technology installed, so-called “green [...]

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Plugged In

If the 50 dirtiest US power plants were a country, it would be the world’s seventh-largest polluter

Fayette Power Plant, a coal-fired generator located southeast of Austin, TX. Photo: LCRA

That’s one takeaway from a new ranking of power plants released by Environment America. The list comes ahead of next week’s expected carbon pollution limits on new plants, to be proposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. There are over 6,000 power plants in the United States, but a majority of the carbon pollution comes [...]

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Plugged In

It’s Time for a Neonicotinoid Time Out

Photo courtesy of  C. Löser via Wikimedia Commons

There’s a mounting pile of evidence that three particular neonicotinoid insecticides, clothianidin, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam, are harming bees. During the late 1990’s this class of pesticides began being used to treat corn and other field crop seeds. Today, they are the most commonly used pesticides in the U.S., and have covered millions of acres. Despite their [...]

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Plugged In

20 Years in the Making – National Standards for Mercury Pollution from Power Plants

epaSeal

Today, after 2 decades of controversy, the U.S. EPA released a final version of its new standards to limit toxic emissions from power plants. Under the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) and the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for fossil-fired power plants, the EPA will be able to regulate the emission of: Heavy metals [...]

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