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Posts Tagged "communications"

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Scientific American Video: We’re Huge in Hungary

screenshot from video "What Happens to Your Body After You Die," with Hungarian subtitles

In early January, Scientific American editor Mark Fischetti noticed that our video “What Happens to Your Body after You Die?” had 466,000 views on YouTube. Well, now it has more than 989,000. Holy cow. At first, we had no idea what was happening, but it struck us that maybe we should investigate what, indeed, was [...]

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Guest Blog

For Its 40th Birthday, Let’s Retire Newsweek’s Global Cooling Story

The cover of Newsweek's April 28, 1975 issue.

Last month, Senator Ted Cruz matter-of-factly told an interviewer that he just happened to glance at a four-decade-old article from Newsweek that very morning. He took a piece by veteran science reporter Peter Gwynne on the then-topical prospect of a cooling Earth and wove a conspiratorial tale that climate science is a Trojan horse for [...]

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Guest Blog

How Identity Evolves in the Age of Genetic Imperialism

Image: Wildpixel/iStock/Thinkstock

From designer babies to women whose genitals smell like peaches, 2014 graced us with a taste of the hope, hype and superficiality of business as usual in Silicon Valley. It is tempting to listen to those who tell us that there is a gene-hack to solve every “problem”—that DNA is just a code to personalize [...]

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Guest Blog

Facing Up to Online Murder and Other Cyber Crimes

Crime scence, do not cross. (Credit: Yumi Kimura/Flickr)

A recent report from Europol’s European Cybercrime Center includes a forecast that the world’s first “online murder” will likely occur before the end of 2014. Obviously this is a frightening concept and one that a number of news outlets quickly seized upon with ominous headlines. However, there’s a far more dangerous story that underlies this [...]

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Guest Blog

A Universe Made of Stories: Why We Need a Science and Technology Dialogue

In quantum mechanics, Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle holds that it is impossible to determine both the position and momentum of a particle. Heisenberg’s breakthrough relates to a subject of vital importance to America: the need for better communications practices in the science and technology fields. Communications is my profession, and I am concerned by what I [...]

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Observations

Readers Choose the Top 10 Scientific American Stories of 2014

Entering a closed timelike curve tomorrow means you could end up at today. Credit: Dmitry Schidlovsky

World events left many marks and losses in 2014, but Scientific American readers kept calm and carried on for the most part, as your top picks among the stories we published this year reveal. We added in behind-the-scenes information for some of your favorites, listed below: 1. Time Travel Simulation Resolves “Grandfather Paradox”—Our online managing [...]

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Observations

‘Chimp Pope’ Launches Scientist-Artist Blogging Partnership

No matter what you think about the Catholic Church, the “Chimp Pope” image (at left) by figurative/narrative artist Nathaniel Gold probably holds your attention and gives you pause about the latest hullabaloo. You can see a color, glossy version of the chimp pope on page 34 of Gold’s book, The Chimpanzee Manifesto, (Jessian Press, 2009). [...]

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Observations

Portable, personal 3G base stations to shrink, play a big role in 4G LTE network rollouts

communications, wireless, Picochip

Over the past two years, telecommunications carriers have come to endorse, and even sell, portable base stations called femtocells (or, depending up on the vendor, picocells or microcells) used to boost wireless 3G signals to smart phones and other wireless devices in areas where network coverage is poor. New developments in femtocells—essentially desktop cell phone [...]

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Voices

Media Portrayals of Female Scientists Often Shallow, Superficial

Neuroscientist Susan Greenfield speaking at an event in Wales in 2013. (Nationa Assembly for Wales/Flickr)

When British neuroscientist Susan Greenfield became the first woman to give the UK’s prestigious Royal Institution Christmas lectures in 1994, journalists at the time focused on her path-breaking achievement. But they also reported on something else: how she looked. The Times of London wrote that in the televised lectures she wore “a blush pink silk [...]

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Voices

More and Better Science en Español: a Call to Action

RedComuniciencia_ROJA_BLOCK

Para leer esta entrada en Español, presione aquí. Few communities encompass as many challenges and opportunities as the 53 million Hispanics living in the United States. Hispanics or Latinos have the second highest poverty rate and the overall lowest educational attainment[1] [2] in the nation. They also have some of the lowest levels of science [...]

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