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Posts Tagged "cephalopods"

The Artful Amoeba

Open Ocean Mama Squid Clings to Bundle of Squirming Bubble Wrap

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Bottom-dwelling squid and octopus usually attach their eggs to a hard surface, but open ocean squid have no such luxury. For many years, scientists thought such squid simply released their eggs to the whims of the currents. Recently, however, Stephanie Bush at Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute discovered that the situation for some open ocean [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

What Do Vampire Squid Really Eat? Hint: It’s Not Blood

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Waters nearly devoid of oxygen are not just found off the coast of South America, as we saw last time. “Oxygen minimum zones” may occur throughout the world’s ocean’s at mid-water depths where food consumption is high but supplies of oxygen are low. Although, as I mentioned last time, such waters are dead zones for [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

Nothing Here But a Hole in the Ocean . . .

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If you live in the upper ocean, it pays to be transparent to avoid the gaze of Things Bigger and Hungrier Than You, since sunlight will pass right through. But if you live deep in the ocean, where predators often come equipped standard with searchlights, being transparent means  lighting up like a Christmas tree under [...]

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Observations

Giant Eyes Help Colossal Squid Spot Glowing Whales

giant squid eye

Giant and colossal squid can grow to be some 12 meters long. But that alone doesn’t explain why they have the biggest eyeballs on the planet. At 280 millimeters in diameter, colossal squid eyes are much bigger than those of the swordfish, which at 90 millimeters, measure in as the next biggest peepers. “It doesn’t [...]

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Observations

Octopuses and squids are damaged by noise pollution

squid hearing damaged by ocean noise pollution

Not only can squids and octopuses sense sound, but as it turns out, these and other so-called cephalopods might be harmed by growing noise pollution in our oceans—from sources such as offshore drilling, ship motors, sonar use and pile driving. "We know that noise pollution in the oceans has a significant impact on dolphins and [...]

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