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Posts Tagged "canada"

Extinction Countdown

Trying to keep Rudolph, and his fellow reindeer, from going down in history

Reindeer, Caribou, Canada, IFAW

Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus. But if we’re not careful, his reindeer could soon be nothing more than a myth. Climate change has put quite a toll on Santa’s herd over the last 40 years. Populations of one North American reindeer subspecies, the Peary caribou (Rangifer tarandus pearyi), have dropped nearly 85 percent [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Will Canada ban polar bear trophy hunting?

Last year, amid much media hoopla, polar bears (Ursus maritimus) received protected status under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. One aspect of that protection is that American hunters, who often travel to Canada to hunt polar bears, can no longer  bring their trophies into the U.S. Canada considers polar bears to be a "species of [...]

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Extinction Countdown

Four seal species in danger of slipping away

As Canada kicks off its controversial seal hunting season this week, several species of seals around the world face uncertain futures. In Finland, the Saimaa ringed seal (Pusa hispida saimensis), one of the world’s few freshwater seals, is likely to become extinct in a few years, according to the Finnish natural resources agency, Metsähallitus. Its [...]

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Observations

Anatomy of One of Canada’s Worst—and Most Costly—Natural Disasters

People on a raft in Calgary

Canadian officials taking stock of the deluge that occurred in mid-June in Alberta have started to characterize it as the worst flood in the province’s history. Some are even calling it Canada’s second-largest natural disaster, after the 1998 ice storm that hit Quebec and eastern Ontario. Analysts think that the cost of the flood, which [...]

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Observations

Tar Sands No Worse Than Other Oils for Pipeline Spills

feeder-pipeline-alberta

The oil derived from Canada’s tar sands is more acidic than other forms of petroleum. So does this mean that diluted bitumen (or “dilbit”) is more corrosive when flowing through a pipeline? The answer is no, according to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences’ National Research Council. A review of U.S. pipeline ruptures over the [...]

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Observations

Obama Has a Plan for Climate, What If It Involves Tar Sands?

obama-oval-office-6-25-2013

On a sweltering day in Washington, D.C., President Barack Obama sweated as he laid out his new plan to combat climate change. In addition to the mandatory cuts in CO2 pollution from coal-fired power plants and the efforts to protect the country from the ravages of climate change highlighted by my colleague Mark Fischetti, Obama [...]

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Plugged In

It’s Not About Tar Sands – It’s About Us

dumping

By Melissa C. Lott and Scott McNally According to Dr. James Hansen, developing Canada’s tar sands would mean “game over for the climate.” And, the current Director of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies is disappointed with President Obama for not taking action to stop Canada from causing a climate change-induced apocalypse. But, what Dr. [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Star Filmmakers Found in Unlikely Spot

Two kids in lab coats and goggles apparently doing an experiment.

In Tyson Schoeber’s class at Nootka Elementary School in Vancouver, 15 fourth through seventh graders struggle to read, write or do math at a level near that of their peers in other classes. Ten-year-olds have entered Schoeber’s program, called THRIVE, virtually unable to read independently (see “One Man’s Mission to Save Struggling Students”). Yet Schoeber [...]

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Symbiartic

Music Steeped in the Wilds of Canada

14-014FEATURE

Eighteen years ago this July, a group of 14 adventurers unloaded tents, gear, food, canoes, and two guitars from the back of a big old bus and loaded them into 7 canoes in a nondescript boat launch outside of Yellowknife, NWT. For the next 47 days, they would paddle against the current, slog through bogs, [...]

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Symbiartic

Largest Assemblage of Cambrian Fossils Since 1909 Discovered in British Columbia

new arthropod

Much of what we know about the diversification of body plans that happened starting 540-million years ago (commonly known as the Cambrian Explosion) comes from the famous Burgess Shale formation. The original site, located in Yoho National Park in the Canadian Rockies, was discovered by paleontologist Charles Walcott in 1909. The site has produced an [...]

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Symbiartic

Standing (and Soaring) with Canadian Science

Canada_Day_Peter_Bond_200

As Symbiartic’s representative Canadian, I’m at least one science illustrator who stands with Canadian scientists today to protest our Conservative government’s attack on science and science communication. And Peter Bond, illustrator and educator who created the Canadian Quetzalcoatlus is another. If you’re unfamiliar with the Conservative government of Canada’s meddling with science, I suggest you [...]

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