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"behavior"47 articles archived since 1845

Is email one of the last private spaces online?

Is email one of the last private spaces online?

Someone has been using my email address. First, she registered it as the recovery address for another account she created, so I was notified about that account.

March 29, 2015 — Krystal D'Costa

A Dog Rolling Over During Play Is a Combat Tactic, Not Submission

I've got the `dog play' bug, arguably one of the better winter bugs to have. I recently covered which toys dogs prefer (the answer: new ones, although old ones can be reinvigorated), as well as the unfortunate finding that when a dog's not "playing right," it could be you, not them.

January 9, 2015 — Julie Hecht

Is Data Really Changing the Nature of Wearable Technology?

Do you have a FitBit story? Last November, S came home with a Fitbit Flex. For those of you who don’t have one of these increasingly ubiquitous devices, it’s a small, plastic band that you wear on your wrist (there are other tracker options as well).

September 8, 2014 — Krystal D'Costa
The Emergence of Death and Dying as We Know It

The Emergence of Death and Dying as We Know It

Once upon a time, people died in their homes. Up until the time of death they were cared for by friends, family members, and appointed religious leaders.

November 26, 2014 — Krystal D'Costa

Plenty of Pheromones in the Sea

As we sat in my car outside a silent movie theater in Los Angeles, my friend anxiously opened a plastic bag containing a white T-shirt she’d slept in for the past three nights.

December 6, 2013 — Julia Calderone

The Unexpected Dog Killer

For some, it happens in the bathroom. For others, it's the living room. All across America, as fireworks go off on July 4th, many dogs experience varying degrees of fear and stress.

July 4, 2014 — Julie Hecht
Bumblebees Are More Flexible Than We Knew

Bumblebees Are More Flexible Than We Knew

I recently wrote about how bumblebees were able to perform some seemingly impressive feats, although the underlying reason they could do so was relatively simple.

May 16, 2014 — Felicity Muth

Do Spayed and Neutered Dogs Get Cancer More Often?

Where I live, in America, it’s taken for granted that responsible owners spay or neuter their dogs. The population of homeless animals is still large enough that risking an unwanted litter is, to many owners, unthinkable.

February 25, 2015 — Jessica P. Hekman

Could Our Love of Dogs Obscure Their Most Important Parts?

Ask me about my childhood dog Brandy, and I hope you have at least an hour to spare. The story of how she came into my life (told here) is entertaining enough (and to hold your attention, I would play up the parts about the mother-daughter conflict that preceded visiting the shelter, as well as [...]

November 30, 2014 — Julie Hecht
Chimpanzees React To A Robo-Doll

Chimpanzees React To A Robo-Doll

A large portion of what animals do is interact with each other. As a social species, we can hardly go an hour without some kind of interaction with another human, be it face-to-face or via text or email.

May 17, 2014 — Felicity Muth
Chimps Will Share Their Lunchbut Only If They Like You

Chimps Will Share Their Lunchbut Only If They Like You

Chimpanzees have a lot to gain from climbing the social ladder. It now appears that lower-ranking male chimps strengthen bonds with their friends in high places by alerting them to some good eats.

December 20, 2013 — Cynthia McKelvey
The Dark Side of Power Posing: Cape or Kryptonite?

The Dark Side of Power Posing: Cape or Kryptonite?

In 1942, the mild mannered Clark Kent excused himself from his friend Lois Lane to take an important call. Clark slipped into a phone booth (remember those?), and moments later Superman emerged.

November 21, 2013 — Jay Van Bavel

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