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Posts Tagged "atlantis"

Expeditions

Seamounts: Exploring underwater mountains

pillow-lava

Editor’s Note: Journalist and crew member Kathryn Eident is traveling on board the RV Atlantis on a monthlong voyage to explore undersea volcanism in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean, among other research projects. This is the second blog post detailing this voyage of discovery for ScientificAmerican.com The water beneath the hull of the RV Atlantis [...]

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Expeditions

Birth of a sea.. floor: Alvin explores the Galapagos Spreading Center

Editor’s Note: Journalist and crew member Kathryn Eident is traveling on board the RV Atlantis on a monthlong voyage to explore undersea volcanism in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean, among other research projects. This is the first blog post detailing this voyage of discovery for ScientificAmerican.com 02º36′ N x 94º47′ W—Thousands of feet below the [...]

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Expeditions

Trichodesmium : The world’s most famous nitrogen fixer

Editor’s Note: Journalist and crew member Kathryn Eident and scientist Jeremy Jacquot are traveling on board the RV Atlantis on a monthlong voyage to sample and study nitrogen fixation in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean, among other research projects. This is the sixth blog post detailing this ongoing voyage of discovery for ScientificAmerican.com. Imagine you’re [...]

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Expeditions

RV Atlantis: Safe from the tsunami

Editor’s Note: Journalist and crew member Kathryn Eident and scientist Jeremy Jacquot are traveling on board the RV Atlantis on a monthlong voyage to sample and study nitrogen fixation in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean, among other research projects. This is the fifth blog post detailing this ongoing voyage of discovery for ScientificAmerican.com. RV ATLANTIS, [...]

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Expeditions

Measuring iron’s importance to ocean life

rv-atlantis

Editor’s Note: Journalist and crew member Kathryn Eident and scientist Jeremy Jacquot are traveling on board the RV Atlantis on a monthlong voyage to sample and study nitrogen fixation in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean, among other research projects. This is the fourth blog post detailing this ongoing voyage of discovery for ScientificAmerican.com. RV ATLANTIS [...]

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Expeditions

In search of the eastern tropical Pacific’s chlorophyll maximum

shannon-tronick

Editor’s Note: Journalist and crew member Kathryn Eident and scientist Jeremy Jacquot are traveling on board the RV Atlantis on a monthlong voyage to sample and study nitrogen fixation in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean, among other research projects. This is the third blog post detailing this ongoing voyage of discovery for Scientific American.com. The [...]

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Expeditions

How many scientists (and scientific instruments) does it take to sample seawater?

Editor’s Note: Journalist and crew member Kathryn Eident and scientist Jeremy Jacquot are traveling on board the RV Atlantis on a monthlong voyage to sample and study nitrogen fixation in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean, among other research projects. This is the second blog post detailing this ongoing voyage of discovery for Scientific American.com. RV [...]

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Guest Blog

Dad, the Apollos and the End of Space Shuttle Era Sadness

I can’t even recall a time that I wasn’t cognisant of the fact that I lived in a country that actively pioneered space exploration. I remember sitting on wicker hassock in my Dad’s study, as a child and asking lots of questions. Dad would light his pipe, lean back in his big red chair, blow [...]

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Guest Blog

Final Shuttle Launch Occasions Anxiety about Future of U.S. in Space

There is a certain sense of unreality as I sit this morning at the Kennedy Space Center press site, with Atlantis on the launch pad just over three miles away awaiting its last mission (STS 135), NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver finishing a briefing on NASA’s ambitious plans for the future, a hundred enthusiastic young [...]

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Life, Unbounded

O NASA! My NASA!

Shuttle mission STS-118 (NASA)

This is not exactly the normal kind of post on Life, Unbounded, but there’s good reason for it. Our species of peculiarly upright, lurching, yabbering, fidgeting, opposing thumb creatures has managed to claw its way through time to arrive at a very special point. During the past fifty years we’ve become organisms with the capacity [...]

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Observations

Space Shuttle Era Ends with Safe Landing of Atlantis

FInal landing of the space shuttle

NASA’s 30-year space shuttle program drew to an end this morning when the Atlantis orbiter touched down safely at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The shuttle landed to complete its final mission—and the final mission for the shuttle program overall—at 5:57 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time. It was the first available landing opportunity for the orbiter. [...]

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Observations

Notes from the Ground: Launch Day Wrap-Up

Atlantis Launch Notes: July 8, 9:00 P.M. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER—What a day it was. One to which I’ll dedicate lots of long-term memory neurons. It started tough, though—at 3:30 A.M., with a four-hour trip to the Kennedy Space Center 45 miles away. On the day that my still sleepy eyes would witness a spaceship rocket [...]

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Observations

Notes from the Ground: A Visit to the Launch Pad

Atlantis Launch Notes: July 7, 6:00 P.M. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER—At T-11 hours and holding all day (as usual, a planned halt). Just got back from the launch pad—and just in time, seems lightning hit within a third of a mile from the shuttle. Mother Nature is stealing the show. It is getting crowded around here. [...]

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Observations

Notes from the Ground: One Day to Go to Final Shuttle Launch

Atlantis Launch Notes: July 7, 9:00 A.M. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER—As of now, NASA’s final space shuttle launch is still on for Friday at 11:26 A.M. Eastern time, but a gathering storm bearing down on Florida’s Space Coast remains a major concern. While waiting on a go/no-go decision from the mission managers yesterday afternoon, I decided [...]

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Observations

The space shuttle’s final flight, and Scientific American will be there

If Atlantis were lifting off on any other flight, its space station resupply mission would be considered routine at best, mundane at worst. No doubt, it would be given only cursory coverage by the mainstream media. But when the solid boosters ignite and STS 135 carries four astronauts into orbit (scheduled for July 8, 11:26 [...]

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Observations

Truckin’ Up to Low Earth Orbit, Part 1: The Shuttle Era Is Go for History

  This is the first of a three-part series that looks back at the 30-year tenure of the U.S. space shuttle program. "The orbiter is a completely different vehicle than anything that has ever flown in space. It was a work platform, a spacewalk platform, a construction site with a robotic arm, a laboratory, a [...]

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PsiVid

Reminiscing about the Space Shuttle Program through Video

I was recently chosen to attend the NASAtweetup for the last shuttle launch of Atlantis. I shared the excitement of the event here on the SciAm Guest blog. Keeping in the theme of our new blog which focuses on science in video, I thought it would be appropriate to include a few shuttle and space [...]

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