Skip to main content

"astronomy"78 articles archived since 1845

NASA Goes Big and Bold for Exoplanet Science

                  A United States federal agency is not necessarily the first place you think of when it comes to answering some of the deepest existential questions for our species.

April 24, 2015 — Caleb A. Scharf

Jupiter’s Moons Ascending

Some natural phenomena need few words to explain why they’re fascinating. Eclipses, transits, and phases in astronomy tend to fall into that category.

February 6, 2015 — Caleb A. Scharf
How to See a Black Hole: Introducing Dark Star Diaries

How to See a Black Hole: Introducing Dark Star Diaries

The image you see here is a computer-generated model of the black hole at the center of the Milky Way, which we call Sagittarius A*. More precisely, it is a model of the "shadow" that Sagittarius A*, with its mass of four million suns, should cast.

March 27, 2014 — Seth Fletcher
How Networks Are Revolutionizing Scientific (and Maybe Human) Thought

How Networks Are Revolutionizing Scientific (and Maybe Human) Thought

Science and common sense are alike grounded in human experience. Yet these ways of thinking about things are often in conflict. Sometimes the simplicity of most commonsense explanations can make it hard to win people over to the complexity and uncertainties of most scientific arguments.

December 12, 2014 — John Edward Terrell, Termeh Shafie and Mark Golitko

What "Interstellar" Gets Wrong about Interstellar Travel

Christopher Nolan’s new film, Interstellar, is a near-future tale of astronauts departing a dying Earth to travel to Saturn, then through a wormhole to another galaxy, all in search of somewhere else humanity could call home.

November 12, 2014 — Lee Billings
Voyager Enters Interstellar Space, and More – The Countdown, Episode 31

Voyager Enters Interstellar Space, and More – The Countdown, Episode 31

More to explore: Voyager 1 Leaves the Solar System—for Real This Time (Scientific American) Voyager Has Entered The Interstellar Medium (Scientific American Blog Network) Space Farming: The Final Frontier (Modern Farmer) The inside of our Milky Way in 3D (Max Planck Institute) Moon Mission to Suck Up Lunar Dust (Nature News) (Scientific American is part [...]

September 21, 2013 — Eric R. Olson
Greeks, Trojans, and a Temporary Companion for Uranus

Greeks, Trojans, and a Temporary Companion for Uranus

A telescopic survey looking for trans-Neptunian objects has chanced across a 37 mile wide chunk of rock and ice that instead moves around the sun in the same orbit as Uranus, just further ahead of the planet.

September 9, 2013 — Caleb A. Scharf
The Dirtiest Lunar Mystery Of All

The Dirtiest Lunar Mystery Of All

                      There may be something funny going on with the stuff covering the Moon, and a new NASA mission launching next month is aiming to solve the mystery.

August 19, 2013 — Caleb A. Scharf

One Photon's Journey: Saul Perlmutter

This is the story of the evolution of life on earth during one photon’s journey across the universe. Told by Saul Perlmutter who shared the 2011 Nobel Prize in physics for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe.

October 14, 2015 — Nature Video

Science of You

All month long get 20% off specially selected editions.

Enter promo-code scienceofyou at checkout.