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Posts Tagged "social"

Anthropology in Practice

Social Lessons from Our Favorite Horror Movies

Photo by Paree, CC.

I’m a fan of scary stories. With a few hours to spare, I’ll gladly spend them with Richard Matheson or Shirley Jackson. If I don’t have a few hours to spare, I’ll pass the time with whatever horror movie I can find playing in the background while I work. Yes, they can be campy. Yes, [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

If You Want Me to RSVP, Then You Need to Actually Invite Me

Responde s'il vous plait. | Photo by Ewan, 2009. | Click image for CC license and information.

I returned the RSVP card for a wedding earlier this week, and it made my think of this piece from the archives where I struggled with RSVPs for my sister-in-law’s bridal shower. Titled “RSVP—A Cultural Construct?,” it examined the obligations that invitations carry. The following has been edited from its original posting for clarity and [...]

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The Artful Amoeba

Are Cycads Social Plants?

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Botanists have long puzzled over a peculiarity of ancient plants called cycads: they have huge, bright, fleshy seeds displayed in enormous cones. Yet there’s nothing correspondingly ginormous to eat and — I’ll use the polite term here — disperse them. And if their presumed former big dispersers (perhaps super-sized ice age mammals, marsupials, birds — [...]

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Beautiful Minds

The Science of Growing Smarter with Annie Murphy Paul

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Science writer Annie Murphy Paul’s fresh perspective on intelligence and personality prompt a heart-to-heart about learning, intelligence assessments, growth mindsets and rethinking intelligence. In this episode you will hear about: Nature vs. nurture and the dynamic nature of personal identity How intelligence/personality are more situationally influenced than we tend to think The follies of IQ [...]

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Beautiful Minds

What Kind of Introvert Are You?

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Are you an introvert? It depends on which book you read. Here’s a sampling of the various conceptualizations of introversion in pop culture [1]: Preference for quiet, minimally stimulating environments: Quiet by Susan Cain Preference for concentration and solitude: The Introvert’s Way by Sophia Dembling Rechargeable battery: The Introvert Advantage by Marti Olsen Laney Thoughtful-introspective: [...]

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Beautiful Minds

The Neuroscience of Social Influence

MIND Guest Blog

Read the Thoughts of a Boy with Autism

Reprinted with permission from SFARI.org, an editorially independent division of the Simons Foundation. (Find original story here.) The autism described in The Reason I Jump is quite different from the mostly social disorder that I, as a researcher and clinician, find in textbooks and journal articles. The new bestselling book, featuring the remarkable testimony of [...]

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MIND Guest Blog

Brain Stimulation Can Control Compliance with Social Norms

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Human beings are utterly dependent on a complex social structure for their survival.  Since all behavior is controlled by the brain, human beings may have evolved specialized neural circuits that are responsible for compliance with society’s rules.  A new study has identified such a region in the human brain, and researchers can increase or decrease [...]

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Not bad science

Mice Will Approach Another Mouse in Pain, But Only When He’s Top Mouse

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Mice, like us, are social animals. As social animals they like to hang out with each other. Also like us, they don’t just hang out with anyone. Who a mouse chooses to hang out with will depend on number of factors, such as how old the other mouse is, what it’s social status is and [...]

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Observations

Brains’ Social Network Formula Dates Back Hundreds of Millions of Years

vertebrates evolution social network circuits brain

Newts aren’t doing a lot of Facebook friending, and last time I checked, the cormorant had not updated its relationship status. But a new neural analysis suggests that our social networking tendencies most likely have their neural roots in some of our early vertebrate ancestors. The findings were published online May 31 in Science. “There [...]

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Plugged In

Tweeting to Save the Day

So Superstorm Sandy comes and pretty much knocks everybody on their butts – and then what? Where to go? Shelters? Food? Which streets are open, and which are flooded? Is somebody dropping off blankets or chain saws somewhere? When? According to Julie Macie, a graduate student at the University of North Carolina working towards a [...]

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