ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network

Posts Tagged "SciamFood"

@ScientificAmerican

Satisfy Your Curiosity with Our New E-Book, Can We Feed the World? The Future of Food

Future of Food Cover

Still hungry after devouring our September 2013 single topic issue: Food? Engage in some guilt-free gluttony with our new companion eBook: Can We Feed the World? The Future of Food. With global population numbers projected to increase by 2 billion by 2050, a veritable food crisis is on the horizon. In this eBook, we examine [...]

Keep reading »
Food Matters

My New Fermentation Obsession

Kraut-batch-2-ingredients

It’s been a while since my last post – I was not quite prepared for how busy I would be teaching 3 classes, doing research and planning a wedding would be. But, the wedding is done! The semester is almost over! And my research is rife with blogging possibilities… Plus, I have a new obsession [...]

Keep reading »
Food Matters

Trick or treat … and wrinkles?

Portrait of  against grey background

Mothers across the nation will likely be warning their costume-clad youngsters that they’ll “feel sick” if they eat too much of the candy they collect tonight. What they may not mention is that foods that raise blood sugar can also cause wrinkles, an effect dermatologist Rajani Katta calls “sugar sag.” I caught up with Katta [...]

Keep reading »
Food Matters

Calorie-burning fat and your brain

Fat mature man measuring his belly with measurement tape

If you follow obesity news, you may have heard of a type of energy-burning “good fat” known as brown fat, which scientists think may have potential to battle a growing epidemic of excess body fat. Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have moved one step closer to realizing this possibility by discovering the brain’s role [...]

Keep reading »
Food Matters

Buzz Feed: The Science Of The Munchies

BuzzFeed

For consumers of cannabis, passing the kouchie can often lead to the inability to pass up any munchies. A recent study conducted by a team of neuroscientists and led by Edgar Soria-Gómez and Giovanni Marsicano may shed some light on the marijuana-munchies connection. Marsicano, principle investigator of a research group at the NeuroCentre Magendie in [...]

Keep reading »
Food Matters

Honey Hunters

Man extracting honeycomb from nest. Courtesy of Brian Wood.

Whether you add it to your tea or use it to sweeten a bowl of oatmeal, honey is a tasty addition to a number of recipes. But have you ever consumed half a liter of raw honey, straight? Neither had Yale anthropologist Brian Wood, until he started living with the Hadza. The Hadza are an [...]

Keep reading »
Food Matters

Getting a Fair Share? Assessing The Impact of Fair Trade

FairTrade

Although Fairtrade products have become popular with consumers who want to make ethical purchases, a recent study about Fairtrade by the University of London, School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) suggests the most marginalized Fairtrade farm workers may not be benefiting from their sales. Christopher Cramer, Professor of the Political Economy of Development at SOAS [...]

Keep reading »
Food Matters

Food on Film

Watching TV

From “Food, Inc.” to “Super Size Me,” the making of America’s food is a popular topic for documentaries. Starting in September, PBS is debuting their own take on the subject, with the new half-hour series “Food Forward TV.” The series will feature pioneers across the food chain—from scientists to chefs—who are testing out new ways [...]

Keep reading »
Food Matters

Carrying canola forward

canola iStock_000012928301Small

Whether you’re coating a baking pan or sautéing squash, you’ll likely reach into your cabinet for a kitchen staple: cooking oil. One of the healthiest of these oils is canola oil, and now, a team of researchers has taken a new step in improving the oil’s source: the canola plant. The researchers, whose home institutions [...]

Keep reading »
Food Matters

Metamorphosis: Changing Perceptions and Approaches Surrounding Entomophagy

Photo by Chris Tonnesen for Nordic Food Lab

Entomophagy, the practice of eating insects, has been advocated for reasons ranging from their potential role in food security to their nutritional and environmental benefits. The always innovative Nordic Food Lab thinks our taste buds may benefit from them, too. “I would say from the point of view of taste, there’s no good reason why [...]

Keep reading »
Food Matters

Food fears: A social issue?

iStock_000016927841Small

From high-fructose corn syrup to lean finely textured beef, health or safety concerns about specific food ingredients can capture the public’s attention and have the potential to significantly impact the food industry. While some food fears are backed by scientific evidence, a recent study by Cornell University researchers suggests food fears may also have a [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Stem Cells Promise Noah’s Ark of Test-Tube Burger Choices

Paul Burger Pic

Envision biting into a warm juicy burger with all the trimmings. If you are a burger fan, your mouth may already be watering. If you are a vegetarian or animal welfare advocate, however, you might be rather disturbed by this imagery. Now imagine that as you are still chewing a bite of that same burger [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

The Citizen Food Safety Project

Tailgate food safety: bratwurst with a Comark PDT300 digital tip-sensitive thermometer. Photo: Benjamin Chapman, 2013.

A walk through the farmers market, grocery store or restaurant will provide a glance into a not-so-new but increasingly prevalent subculture: cataloging food porn through smartphone cameras. Even the guys at the table beside me at a food court in O’Hare airport are taking pictures of their lunch and texting/tweeting/instagramming. Someone on a phone elsewhere [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

40 Percent of Food in the U.S. Never Gets Eaten

Dana_Gunders

My second round of inquiry into The Dating Game report by NRDC, which explains how the food dating system drives food waste in America, was with two authors of the report itself- Emily Broad Lieb, who directs the Harvard Law School Food Law and Policy Clinic, an expert on the legal system that contributes to [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Dr. Ted Labuza on Slime, Bombs and Rot

Ted_Labuza

It’s not that I thought food science was boring before I interviewed Ted Labuza, Morse Alumni Distinguished Teaching Professor of Food Science and Engineering at University of Minnesota, but let’s just say that before our phone conversation last week, I had no idea how fascinating, nor dangerous and important, some of the food issues he’s [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

The Scarecrow–Lots of Heart, but It Could Use More Brain [Video]

mail.google.com

Have you seen the Chipotle Grill animated video “The Scarecrow”? More than four million people have, since it was first published last week. It’s a cry against unsustainable industrial food production, and a plea for simpler ‘natural’ ways. It’s appealing, but The Scarecrow is also dangerous. It feeds a naively false black-and-white dichotomy between an [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Food for Rethinking Markets

Sci_Am_Utiltiy_Unicorn

No perfect rationality is needed to see that markets often don’t work as advertised. But without perfect rationality, and other utopian conditions, the math of market theory doesn’t work. Businesses often ignore such unrealistic theorizing. So should we. “Free markets” are supposedly “efficient.” But by what stretch of reason, or misuse of words, can the [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Labels and Other “Krafty” Stuff

photo taken in London June 1, 2013

Genetic engineering of crops and genetically modified (GM) food are hotly debated topics. Since California’s Prop 37 for mandatory labeling of GMOs was defeated in November 2012, more than two dozen states have introduced bills into their legislature that would enact labeling. Although the push for labeling appears to be a recent phenomenon, the campaign [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Salt: Defender of the Carotenoids

05-thwarted

If flour is the star of bread making, salt is the director, invisible in the dough but controlling its action and timing. Salt adds flavor. It slows fermentation. It tightens gluten and makes the dough less gloppy. And one of its lesser known jobs is protecting the flour’s carotenoids. The most famous carotenoid, carotene, gives [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Solutions for Micronutrient Deficiency

Frank N. Foode , mascot of the Biofortified Blog, poses with some orange maize that has been bred to express very high levels of beta-carotene. Follow Frank’s adventures on twitter: @franknfoode Photo by Anastasia Bodnar.

You  will never understand violence or nonviolence until you understand the violence to the spirit that happens from watching your children die of malnutrition. – a peasant in El Salvador (quote from Witness to War) The recent destruction of Golden Rice trials in the Philippines has me thinking again about how crop genetics, including biotechnology, [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Riots, Rage and Resistance: A Brief History of How Antibiotics Arrived on the Farm

Early twentieth-century farmers struggled to keep pace with demand

In 1950, American farmers rejoiced at news from a New York laboratory: A team of scientists had discovered that adding antibiotics to livestock feed accelerated animals’ growth and cost less than conventional feed supplements. The news blew “the lid clear off the realm of animal nutrition,” crowed the editors of one farm magazine. Farmers and [...]

Keep reading »
MIND Guest Blog

The Fat-Fueled Brain: Unnatural or Advantageous?

It’s not bacon; it’s therapy! Source: Renée S. Suen on Flickr.

Disclaimer: First things first. Please note that I am in no way endorsing nutritional ketosis as a supplement to, or a replacement for medication. As you’ll see below, data exploring the potential neuroprotective effects of ketosis are still scarce, and we don’t yet know the side effects of a long-term ketogenic diet. This post talks [...]

Keep reading »
MIND Guest Blog

Tricking Taste Buds but Not the Brain: Artificial Sweeteners Change Brain’s Pleasure Response to Sweet

DietSoda_RoadsidePictures_Flickr

Do NOT EAT the chemicals. It is the #1 laboratory safety rule young scientists learn to never break and for good reason; it keeps lab citizens alive and unscathed. However, if it hadn’t been for the careless, rule-breaking habits of a few rowdy scientists ingesting their experiments, many artificial sweeteners may never have been discovered. [...]

Keep reading »
The Network Central

#SciAmBlogs Friday – gut bacteria, GMOs, food math videos, horsemeat, anime science outreach, donkeys, yeast, vegetarian kids, and more.

the-network-central

Today we finish the Food Week at #SciAmBlogs. You can find all the posts by searching Twitter for hashtag #SciAmFood. And we also have a new Image of the Week. – Pamela Ronald – Buddhist Economics and A GMO rethink   – Kevin Bonham – What’s eating us?   – Jag Bhalla – Food For [...]

Keep reading »
The Network Central

Food Week Collection at #SciAmBlogs – #SciAmFood

Drip-Irrigation 200x200

Wow, if I may say so myself, this was a wonderful week of food blogging! We launched a new group blog dedicated to food, and each of the seven bloggers posted this week. We had several guest bloggers. And of course, a number of our network bloggers chimed in. Bookmark this collection so you can [...]

Keep reading »
The Network Central

#SciAmBlogs Thursday – food in space, food in schools, food labels, artificial sweeteners, Fork & Knife Politics, donkeys, and more.

the-network-central

- Julianne Wyrick – Astronaut nutrition: staying healthy for a year in space   – Patrick Mustain – It Is Not True That Kids Won’t Eat Healthy Food: Why The New USDA School Food Guidelines Are Very Necessary   – Cami Ryan – Labels and Other “Krafty” Stuff   – Caitlin Kirkwood – Tricking taste [...]

Keep reading »
The Network Central

#SciAmBlogs Tuesday – Food Matters, Food Week, farm antibiotics, socratic dialogue, wolf chorus, micronutrient deficiency, and more.

Drip-Irrigation 200x200

Yes, today we announced the launch of Food Matters, a group blog about food. – Layla Eplett, Pamela Ronald, Kathleen Raven, Julianne Wyrick, Kevin Bonham, Patrick Mustain and See Arr Oh – Introducing: The Food Matters Crew   – Kathleen Raven – Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner?   – Maureen Ogle – Riots, Rage, and [...]

Keep reading »
The Network Central

Welcome Food Matters – a big new group blog at #SciAmBlogs

Drip-Irrigation 200x200

You are probably aware that this is the Food Week on our blog network, following in the fooststeps of the publication of the special Food issue of the Scientific American magazine. Today, I am super-excited to introduce the brand new group blog at the network, fully devoted to the topic of Food – the “Food [...]

Keep reading »
The Network Central

Food Week on #SciAmBlogs network!

Scitable leaf

You may have noticed that the September 2013 Issue of Scientific American Magazine is a special issue devoted to the topic of food, plus all the web-only exclusives. You may also remember that we had a food day on the blogs here two years ago – Passions of Food—Special Day at #SciAmBlogs. Obviously, food is [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

Urban Farm Versus the Apocalypse

urban_farm_J_Ellis_mini

Urban Farm on a Rainy Day © Jon Ellis (aka jonorobo). Click each image to see enlarged version on DeviantArt. Most concept art is obsessed with various forms of self-inflicted apocalypse.  If humanity has any hope to avert future catastrophes, that hope lays with designers, architects and engineers. I came across the Urban Farm concept art [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

Modern Art Upsetting Your Stomach? Take a Dose of David

TumsDavid-sq

It is widely believed that Michaelangelo’s favorite medium to work with was Carrara marble. The single gigantic piece of quarried marble had been more or less ruined a generation earlier by the efforts of the sculptor Agostino who had carved deeply into the block. It languished for 25 years exposed to the elements in a [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

#DispatchesDNLee: Culinary Tour of my Tanzanian Meals

salad, mbuzi (goat meat) ugali

You have to eat. No matter what else happens in life, where we go or why we go, we can’t escape the necessity of eating, fueling up. One of the most popular questions I get about my visits to Tanzania is: “How’s the food?” It was different. Not bad at all. My biggest surprises was [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

Fork & Knife Politics: 5 Names in the Food Justice Movement you should know

cover_2013-09

The September 2013 Issue of Scientific American Magazine is a special issue devoted to the topic of food and the entire Scientific American Blog Network is celebrating Food Week September 2-6, 2013. As I was writing my post Appreciating what is on my plate (September 4, 2013) I was thinking of how how others are [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

Appreciating what is on my plate

Tomatoes from my Mother's garden

Both my maternal and paternal grandmothers grew up during the Great Depression. That lean, harsh economic time made an indelible imprints on them – their spirits, their habits, and outlook on life. Those marks were especially present in each of their relationships to food, so much so, that 40-50 years later that I too was [...]

Keep reading »

More from Scientific American

Scientific American Holiday Sale

Give a Gift &
Get a Gift - Free!

Give a 1 year subscription as low as $14.99

Subscribe Now! >

X

Email this Article

X