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Posts Tagged "#STEM"

Anthropology in Practice

What will the future of education look like?

In the absence of a traditional classroom, learning goes on in Mexico. | Image by JIji Lee. Click for license and information.

Scientific American’s August supplement takes a look at the changing landscape of education in the face of emerging technology, and asks the question, how do we increase interest and engagement in STEM initiatives? Learning in the Digital Age tackles issues of using big data to better understand students, the validity of online courses, and the [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

Science Can Be Pink, But It Should Also Be Equal

I have three beautiful nieces. One is thirteen, one just turned two, and the littlest one will be celebrating her first birthday on Friday. They’re all experiencing various stages of change and undergoing assorted adjustments. The thirteen-year-old is in middle school, and is negotiating a new social landscape with both her friends and her parents. [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

Making, Education, and Innovation: Inspiring Makers in Underrepresented Communities

Maker Faire invites young Makers to enter a world of innovation and imagination. If you can dream it, you can build it—particularly as experienced Makers are on-hand and willing to share what they know. How can we better encourage a broader participation in this science and technology showcase by underrepresented groups—beginning in the very neighborhood [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Scientific American Science in Action Winner Kenneth Shinozuka

Kenneth Shinozuka, 2014 winner of the Scientific American Science in Action award, powered by the Google Science Fair. Credit: Google Science Fair

It’s no secret to Scientific American readers that we feel a special obligation to support the next generation of science enthusiasts, whom we hope to inspire both with our science coverage and our education initiatives, including the Scientific American Science in Action Award, powered by the Google Science Fair. The awards event was held a [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Putting Science in Action in Swaziland

T.H. Culhane and Scientific American Science in Action winners and Google Science Fair finalists during a Hangout in Swaziland.

In 2012, the Scientific American Science in Action award became part of Google Science Fair. Last month, one of the judges for both, T.H. Culhane, traveled to Swaziland to work with our 2012 winners as well as another finalist and more; we had a Swaziland Hangout during the visit. Now I’m thrilled to bring to [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

A Hangout with Google Science Fair in Swaziland

Left to right: Sakhiwe Shongwe, TH Culhane, Bonkhe Mahlalela, Rohit Fenn, Bayinda, Amit Fenn in Swaziland. Credit: YouTube

You know what’s awesome? Seeing a bunch of young people at work on changing the world to make it a better place for all. Today, I hosted a Google Science Fair Hangout On Air on Sustainability in Swaziland, and I got to have that privilege. Now I want to share it with you. My fellow [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

A Hangout IN Air–Off a Cliff Face–for Science

Jason Osborne rappelling, running Hangout On Air with phone, and looking for fossils. Credit: Aaron Alford.

When I last did a Google Science Fair Hangout On Air with Jason Osborne and Aaron Alford, founders of Paleo Quest, they were diving in a swamp looking for fossils. Yesterday, they took their fossil quest to new heights, rather literally: this time, they hung on ropes off the side of a cliff for a [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Scientific American Editor Testifies at U.S. Senate

Mariette DiChristina

At a hearing on the future of federal research investment, a science magazine editor and three noted scientists asked the U.S. Senate to support basic research

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@ScientificAmerican

Kid Scientists Make Real Fossil Finds at the USA Science & Engineering Festival

Kids searching for fossils using SharkFinder kits at Scientific American's booth at the USA Science & Engineering Festival.

Kids searching for fossils using SharkFinder kits at Scientific American’s booth at the USA Science & Engineering Festival. Credit: Jason Osborne Jason Osborne was trying to grab a quick lunch away from the crowds when his wife called his cellphone. “Jason, you’ve got to come see this boy at the booth. He’s amazing!” When Osborne, [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Scientific American at the USA Science & Engineering Festival

I’ll write a fuller post about the amazing things that kids are doing at Scientific American’s booth 1311 at the USA Science & Engineering Festival, but I wanted to share the short video below. In it, you’ll meet the festival’s co-founders, Larry Bock and Ray O. Johnson of Lockheed Martin (which itself has a booth [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Astrophysics, Citizen Science and the Google Science Fair

Chris Lintott, astrophysicist of Oxford University and founder of The Zooniverse. Credit: YouTube

Find out why Oxford University astrophysicist and founder of The Zooniverse Chris Lintott believes that humanity’s ability to be “deliciously distractable” is a creative engine powering the benefits of citizen science for discovery–and how, if you are a researcher, you might like to “play with your phyiscs.” With Google Student Ambassador Hanne Paine, we had [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Google Science Fair Hangout On-Air: Meet the Deep-Sea-Diving Exosuit

Vincent Pieribone, John Sparks, Exosuit and Mariette DiChristina. Credit: YouTube

Scientists studying marine life now have a new tool in a next-generation atmospheric diving system called the Exosuit. The suit–which looks like something an astronaut would wear and is on display at the American Museum of Natural History until March 5–lets a diver descend to 1,000 feet at surface pressure for several hours. As part [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Scientific American Science in Action in Swaziland

Sakhiwe Shongwe (left center, in green sweater), Bonkhe Mahlalela (right center, in green sweater) and local farmers in Swaziland.

We judges and others who work on the Google Science Fair believe that kids have the power to change the world. The $50,000 Scientific American Science in Action Award recognizes a particular type of change—one that focuses on making a practical difference by addressing an environmental, health or resources challenge. (For more on the award [...]

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Beautiful Minds

The Need for Belonging in Math and Science

iStock_000018252121XSmall

From her earliest memories, Catherine Good was good at math. By second grade she was performing at the fourth grade level, sometimes even helping the teacher grade other students’ work. She was praised constantly for her “gift”, often overhearing her mother tell anyone who would listen that she was a “sponge” for anything mathematical. By [...]

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Budding Scientist

Girls With a Plan to Ease World Hunger Win Top Science Award

A chance observation about warts on a pea plant led a trio of teenagers on a three-year mission to solve the world food crisis. Their perseverance earned them top honors at the annual Google Science Fair in Mountain View, California. Emer Hickey, 16, Ciara Judge, 16, and Sophie Healy–Thow, 17, of Kinsale, Ireland won the [...]

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Budding Scientist

7 Amazing Google Science Fair Projects

Tonight, Google will announce the winners of its fourth annual Google Science Fair, which Scientific American co-sponsors. Watch the awards ceremony here live. The 15 global finalists, ages 13 to 18, set up their projects yesterday at Google headquarters in Mountain View California for judges and members of the public to see.  The grand prize [...]

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Budding Scientist

Hooked on Metrics: Why Learning Can and Should Be Measured

The following is a guest post by Scott Bennett, principal of eSTEM Academy in Reynoldsburg, Ohio When I first started teaching science 10 years ago, no one ever talked about achievement or thought about data. You just entered the classroom, taught and assumed what you were doing were the right things. One day, my principal [...]

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Budding Scientist

Skulls, Bloodletting, and How to Teach Science

[View the story "Skulls, Elephants and How To Teach Science" on Storify]

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Budding Scientist

Jell-O Brains and DNA: High School Students Launch Innovative STEM Program

Project BEST Jello Brains

The following guest post is by Roy Rinberg, a graduate of Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Alexandria, Va. and an incoming freshman at New York University. He is co-founder of Project Building Excitement for Science and Technology (BEST), an afterschool program for junior high school students. My love of science, technology, engineering [...]

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Budding Scientist

Stop Lecturing Me (In College Science)!

Screen shot 2014-05-19 at 10.53.21 PM

College lecture classes have been around for more than 900 years. Lately, a handful of science and engineering professors have been experimenting with a more innovative way of teaching science, especially at the introductory level. The idea is to have students spend their class time solving problems and engaging in activities that are designed to [...]

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Budding Scientist

A High School Lab As Engaging as Facebook

Just down the hall from Paulo Blikstein’s office at Stanford University is a student laboratory of the future. It has spring green-and-yellow tiled floors, matching walls and is stocked with every type of digital fabrication tool one can imagine: laser cutters, 3D printers, 3D scanners, 3D milling machines, robotics, and programming tools.  “In short, we [...]

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Budding Scientist

A littleBit of Electronic Literacy

Guest Post by Ayah Bdeir, founder and CEO of littleBits, an award-winning open source library of electronic modules that magnetically snap together to allow users to create simple circuits and innovative projects. Probably one of the most annoying things I hear adults say is, “I’m not really a technology kind of person.” Unfortunately, I hear [...]

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Budding Scientist

A “Napster Moment” in Education

Digital education is like whitewater rafting. Or like the Napster era in music.  The two analogies were among many that came up yesterday as panelists considered the future of technology in education at a Scientific American and Macmillan Science & Education summit on “Learning in the Digital Age,” at Google’s New York headquarters. As a [...]

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Budding Scientist

Budding Scientist Projects: Caterpillar Olympics

My parents have an old birch tree in their backyard in Western Massachusetts. Each August, we watch a new generation of black-and-white hickory tussock moth caterpillars make its way down from the tree and toward the side of our house to weave cocoons. Last summer, there were so many of these fluffy creatures that they [...]

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Guest Blog

Play, Informal Learning Cultivate Kids’ Interest in STEM

A visitor learns to solder and connect a circuit in a workshop at the New York Hall of Science's Maker Space.

When I was eight years old I couldn’t speak English. I’d been born in another country and came to the U.S. because my father’s postdoctoral medical research brought us here. Frustrated with my inability to communicate with others, I stopped trying. I didn’t want to play with the other kids anyway – at least that’s [...]

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Guest Blog

Teaching Kids to Love Science, and Falling in Love with the Kids

  Put a science writer in a classroom with two-dozen ten-year-olds and I promise you this: the writer will learn more than the kids. I’ve just had that experience, not for the first time but in an especially fulfilling way, while talking about science to a group of fourth and fifth graders at Public School [...]

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Guest Blog

A Universe Made of Stories: Why We Need a Science and Technology Dialogue

In quantum mechanics, Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle holds that it is impossible to determine both the position and momentum of a particle. Heisenberg’s breakthrough relates to a subject of vital importance to America: the need for better communications practices in the science and technology fields. Communications is my profession, and I am concerned by what I [...]

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Guest Blog

Channeling Ada Lovelace: Chien-Shiung Wu, Courageous Hero of Physics

Linocut of Chien-Shiung Wu

Today marks the 5th Ada Lovelace Day, an annual celebration of women who have made important contributions to the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). The event is named for Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace, who is often credited as the first computer programmer. Since its inception in 2009, Ada Lovelace Day [...]

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Guest Blog

Breaking Brick Stereotypes: LEGO Unveils a Female Scientist

scientist-minifig-sm

It’s 11:47 am on the Sunday before Labor Day, and I’m staking out a LEGO store inside a Byzantine shopping mall on the outskirts of Boston. I am here with a coterie of children and parents, the lot of us waiting impatiently while three LEGO associates in black shirts and khakis make their last-minute preparations [...]

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Image of the Week

Kids Coding With Compassion

HelloNaviTeam-FEATURE

Source: from “Middle Schoolers Develop App to Help Visually Impaired,” by Mónica I. Feliú-Mójer’s on Voices Credit: Image courtesy of Maggie Bolado From the Department of Inspiring Teenagers, meet the all-female team of six that invented an app to help visually impaired students navigate their schools. They are students at Resaca Middle School, a small, [...]

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Molecules to Medicine

Need a Hand? Now You Can Print One

Shea - heart

“Every 4 1/2 minutes, a baby is born with a birth defect.” That translates to 1 of just 33 babies being born with a defect in the U.S. Of these, about 1,500 babies, or 4 out of every 10,000 babies are born missing a hand or arm (“upper limb reduction”). While crude replacements have been [...]

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Molecules to Medicine

Reflections from a Woman on “Otherness” in Medicine

No sexism, racism, homophobia

When Danielle N. Lee, a PhD biologist, was likened to a whore last week for declining to work for free, I was furious. She and Scicurious proposed a series of posts on diversity in science and I reached out, asking if my perspective as a woman physician might be of interest. (As a physician, and [...]

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Observations

Global STEM Alliance Adds SUNY and Buenos Aires to Education Network

277

The future of tomorrow’s global economy relies on the education of children today and the technology they will be able to produce, which is why the New York Academy of Sciences (NYAS) and Cisco established a partnership earlier this year to encourage children to take on professions in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, also known [...]

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Observations

Global STEM Outreach Effort to Target Middle Schoolers in Barcelona and Malaysia

Credit: ThinkStock

A global alliance aimed at educating and empowering youth to become the next generation to enter the information and communication technologies (ICT) workforce was announced today in Barcelona, Spain, at Cisco’s Internet of Things World Forum.. Established in response to a growing demand for workers in this field, the Global STEM Alliance will be modeled [...]

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Observations

Science Advisor Gives Hopeful Progress Report on Obama’s Achievements

John Holdren addresses audience at the Stevens Institute of Technology President

President Obama has restored science to its rightful place in the White House, says John Holdren, Obama’s senior science advisor. “Science is again where it should be,” he told an audience of 200 as part of a lecture series at the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, N.J. on Wednesday, although he warned that the [...]

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Observations

Watch This Amazing 12-Year-Old Launch a Hello Kitty into Space [Video]

Hello Kitty in Space

NASA doesn’t have a lock on space exploration anymore. Just ask Lauren Rojas, a seventh grader in Antioch, Calif., who recently launched a balloon to 93,625 feet* using a do-it-yourself balloon kit from High Altitude Science. In addition to an altimeter, thermometer, satellite tracker and a host of cameras, Rojas added a decorative rocket ship [...]

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Observations

Abandoning Algebra Is Not the Answer

In an opinion piece for the New York Times on Sunday, political science professor Andrew Hacker asks, “Is Algebra Necessary?” and answers, “No.” It’s not just algebra: geometry and calculus are on the chopping block, too. It’s not that he doesn’t think math is important; he wants the traditional sequence to be replaced by a [...]

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Observations

Champions of Science in Lancaster, Pa.

science fair winner

As my Amtrak train rolled past the “Lancaster” sign, the window view alighted on the upright figure of an Amish farmer and his mule-team-pulled hand plow, working the verdant Pennsylvania land just as his forefathers have done here for more than two centuries. I remembered that I was only some 33 miles from Dover, Pa., [...]

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Observations

Scientists Lauded at the White House, Winners of National Medals

National Medal of Science and National Medal of Technology and Innovation honorees

The honorees stood, backs ramrod straight, facing the audience at the White House. Each was about to receive either the National Medal of Science or the National Medal of Technology and Innovation. As the moment stretched, the silence of anticipation filled the room. Suddenly, a cellphone chirped—literally—with a sound of a cricket in an empty [...]

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Observations

Schools should teach kids more about how science is done

WASHINGTON—Is a "mystery tube" the key to improving science education in the United States? The prop, a cylinder with two pieces of string running through it, briefly took center stage here at a packed symposium on Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education, part of the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement [...]

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PsiVid

Where are the Women Science Creators on Youtube?

Click image to watch Joanne's Blood Cell Bakery Introduction

Many times I wondered this myself, and while I had the attention of the youtube infamous Hank Green of SciShow, I asked him in correspondence last year: “One last thing, while I have your attention. Have you noticed that there are so few women represented on youtube talking about science? It’s one thing that TV [...]

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PsiVid

STEM Makes Cars Safer, Buildings Taller, Enables Hearing and Moves Giant Magnets!

Muon g-2 magnet to be transported to Fermilab

As I reflect on the content of videos I have shared or watched in social media this week, I’m simply in awe at the creativity and ingenuity of humans and how we have used science, technology and engineering (and math) for our health, safety and progress. Some of these videos represent topics fresh this week [...]

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PsiVid

India Trip to Examine Issues in Child Survival: How Science and Engineering Help

Back in October, I opened my email to find an interesting invitation for me to apply for a trip to India as part of a special International Reporting Project bloggers’ trip focusing on child survival and related issues of health and development. The trip described in full “The trip will focus on issues of child [...]

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Roots of Unity

Here a Henge, There a Henge: Astronomy Fun on a Street Near You

Manhattanhenge. Image: Flickr user EffingBoring.

I am traveling for most of July, so I hope you enjoy this post from the past, which originally appeared on the Budding Scientist blog on July 10, 2012. Last summer I was living in New York for the first time, and I was super jazzed when my roommate told me about Manhattanhenge. It turns out, [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Teen Builds Gateway to the Brain for Girls

Girls run on a brain maze

The Synapse Project “encourages young women to enter the field of neuroscience through information and mentorship,” according to its website. This endeavor, an amalgam of outlets for kids, information for teens and career advice for young women, turns out to be the brainchild of … a child, one keenly interested in the brain. Sixteen-year-old Grace [...]

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Symbiartic

Build-A-Monster From the Inside Out

buildamonster1mini

Spongelab has taken their popular Build-a-Body educational anatomy app and given it a Halloween makeov- umm, makeover is the wrong word. Halloween skin?  No, that’s not it. Ew. Build-a-Monster! Learn more about the NSF and Science award-winning Build-a-Body here and see Spongelab’s newsletter for more science-ed and Hallowe’en goodness. Spongelab @Spongelab on Twitter and Ello [...]

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Voices

Culture Dish: Promoting Diversity in Science Writing

Image courtesy of Klari Reis - www.klariart.com

The most persistent — and infuriating — question about diversity in science writing has to be: “Why do we need diversity?” Sometimes that question is followed by this: “Isn’t science color-blind?” To answer that second question first — no, science is most definitely not color-blind, any more than history or politics or literature is color-blind. [...]

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Voices

Middle Schoolers Develop App to Help Visually Impaired

From left to right: Cassandra Baquero, Andres Salas, Janessa Leija and Caitlin Gonzales in front of the White House.

“We saw him struggling, trying to get around. What if we could create an app to help him?” Like many great ideas, Hello Navi started with a question. The app—invented by Cassandra Baquero, Grecia Cano, Caitlyn Gonzalez, Kayleen Gonzalez, Janessa Leija and Jacqueline Garcia Torres—helps visually challenged students navigate their school grounds. Hello Navi was [...]

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Voices

Latinas in STEM: Making Bright Futures a Reality

Members of the Latinas in STEM Board of Directors (from left to right): Madeline Salazar, Noramay Cadena, Jazlyn Carvajal, Veronica Garcia and Daiana Albarrán Chicas. (Credit: Latinas in STEM)

Editor’s note: During National Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15 to October 15), Ciencia Puerto Rico and Borinqueña are celebrating the work of organizations inspiring, supporting and empowering Latinas in STEM fields. You can read the following post in Spanish here. Latinas have a bright future in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Latina girls love [...]

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Voices

More and Better Science en Español: a Call to Action

RedComuniciencia_ROJA_BLOCK

Para leer esta entrada en Español, presione aquí. Few communities encompass as many challenges and opportunities as the 53 million Hispanics living in the United States. Hispanics or Latinos have the second highest poverty rate and the overall lowest educational attainment[1] [2] in the nation. They also have some of the lowest levels of science [...]

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Voices

Channeling Ada Lovelace: Chien-Shiung Wu, Courageous Hero of Physics

Linocut of Chien-Shiung Wu

Today marks the 5th Ada Lovelace Day, an annual celebration of women who have made important contributions to the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). The event is named for Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace, who is often credited as the first computer programmer. Since its inception in 2009, Ada Lovelace Day [...]

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Voices

Breaking Brick Stereotypes: LEGO Unveils a Female Scientist

It’s 11:47 am on the Sunday before Labor Day, and I’m staking out a LEGO store inside a Byzantine shopping mall on the outskirts of Boston. I am here with a coterie of children and parents, the lot of us waiting impatiently while three LEGO associates in black shirts and khakis make their last-minute preparations [...]

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