ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network

Posts Tagged "Olympics"

Absolutely Maybe

No guts, no glory? The fear and attraction of risky winter sports

Illustration of ski-jumping

This blog appears in the In-Depth Report Science at the Sochi Olympics The one time I went flying off the side of a mountain on skis, I certainly didn’t mean to. Before I hit the ground, there was a surprising amount of time for reflection – and more on the long painful schlep down to [...]

Keep reading »
@ScientificAmerican

Science at the Olympics? Our First E-Book Can Explain

Scientific American, The Science of Sports: Winning in the Olympics, eBook

The Olympics is the world’s greatest athletic event. Men and women run, swim, dive, lift, vault, serve, swing, kick and play against one another until a champion is crowned, in sport after sport. But what separates each champion from his or her competitors, who are all elite athletes themselves? To answer that and many other [...]

Keep reading »
Food Matters

Fast Pace–Does Observing Ramadan Affect Athletic Performance?

FastPace1

Two significant religious events (although one has yet to officially be declared one) commenced over the past weekend–in addition to the second round of the World Cup starting, Ramadan, the Islamic holy month observed by fasting, also began. This is the first time the two have coincided since 1986, though other major sporting events have [...]

Keep reading »
Molecules to Medicine

Germs, Microbes Compete With Athletes in Sochi Olympics

Ski Jump

This blog appears in the In-Depth Report Science at the Sochi Olympics The Olympics are not just a chance for countries to bring home the gold. They also provide a perfect chance to spread infections all over the world. The Olympics are likely surpassed only by the annual Hajj Islamic pilgrimage to Mecca in the [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

“Team Climate” Gets Sochi Athletes All Abuzz about Climate Change

Members of Team Climate pose with American Olympian Kyle Tress Credit: Courtesy Taylor Rees / Team Climate

This blog appears in the In-Depth Report Science at the Sochi Olympics Climate change poses a well-documented threat to ecosystems and human populations worldwide. But as the inexorable warming trend continues, it’s also endangering the future of winter sports. In a new report published in January by the University of Waterloo, researchers analyzed the suitability [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Lance Armstrong Comes Clean—a Mixed Blessing for Sports

armstrong,cycling,doping

Lance Armstrong’s confession to Oprah Winfrey earlier this week that he’s been a drug cheat throughout his illustrious career was a mixed blessing for the sports world. On one hand, key questions have been answered and a perpetrator has been caught. We now know that cycling’s preeminent athlete over the past two decades managed to [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Dana Vollmer’s Butterfly Stroke Features Dolphinlike Moves [Video]

U.S. swimmer Dana Vollmer’s record-setting performance in London in the 100-meter butterfly is sure to be a model for aspiring Olympians. Vollmer’s edge in butterfly competition comes from her uncanny ability to closely mimic the underwater undulation and kick of nature’s greatest swimmer—the dolphin. The 24-year-old Syracuse, N.Y., native worked with a team of motion-capture [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Push Comes to Pull: What’s the Best Freestyle Swimming Stroke? [Video]

This summer’s Olympic games in London feature 14 different freestyle swimming competitions, by far the most races for any type of stroke. The world’s elite swimmers can traverse a 50-meter pool in 22 to 26 seconds, yet they are divided over which of two variations of the stroke are more effective: the more powerful “deep [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Winter Olympic medals made from recycled e-waste

Vancouver,e-waste,medal,Olympic

When Olympic champions are crowned at this year’s winter games in Vancouver, these elite athletes will be taking home more than just gold, silver or bronze medals—they will be playing a role in Canada’s efforts to reduce electronic waste. That’s because each medal was made with a tiny bit of the more than 140,000 tons [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Athlete alert: Is genetic juicing set to replace steroids?

gene therapy doping athlete olympics

When Olympic medals and multi-million-dollar contracts are at stake, athletes and coaches have been known to resort to drastic measures to strike gold. But as the steroid era evolves amidst increased testing and public hectoring, what other performance booster will enter the ring? Gene therapy, say a host of researchers, three of whom call for [...]

Keep reading »
Plugged In

What happens to cities after the Olympics are gone?

los angeles_385

What happens to Olympic host cities after the torch has gone out?

Keep reading »
Plugged In

Will The Lights Stay On In Sochi?

Sochi

With the world focused on Sochi now that the Winter Olympic Games have begun, will the power stay on? Russia has engaged in 49 major energy projects since it won the bid to host the Olympics back in 2007. As National Geographic explains, these should boost Sochi’s capacity to generate electricity by 800 percent. Among [...]

Keep reading »
Plugged In

Sustainability Gold for the 2012 London Olympics

london-2012-olympics-logo

With the 2012 London Olympics drawn to a close, so starts the task of breaking down parts of the 500-acre Olympic Park that housed the world’s finest athletes for the past two weeks. But, the London 2012 Organizing Committee and the Olympic Delivery Authority are already two steps ahead. In their effort to keep this [...]

Keep reading »
PsySociety

Blind athletes provide clues about the nature of our emotions.

514px-石井と鈴木

One of the most important ways that we learn how to interact with the world around us is through observational learning. By watching how our friends and family members behave, we learn at a very young age how to do things like turn on a lightbulb, open a door, or play with a doll, without [...]

Keep reading »
Streams of Consciousness

Star Filmmakers Found in Unlikely Spot

Two kids in lab coats and goggles apparently doing an experiment.

In Tyson Schoeber’s class at Nootka Elementary School in Vancouver, 15 fourth through seventh graders struggle to read, write or do math at a level near that of their peers in other classes. Ten-year-olds have entered Schoeber’s program, called THRIVE, virtually unable to read independently (see “One Man’s Mission to Save Struggling Students”). Yet Schoeber [...]

Keep reading »

More from Scientific American

Scientific American Holiday Sale

Black Friday/Cyber Monday Blow-Out Sale

Enter code:
HOLIDAY 2014
at checkout

Get 20% off now! >

X

Email this Article

X