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Posts Tagged "community"

Anthropology in Practice

Why is the grass always greener on social media?

Image by Kitty Terwolbeck. Used without alteration. Click on image for license and information.

Are you on social media? I’m willing to bet you’re on at least one channel (and it’s probably Facebook). In December 2013, 73% of adults online were using a social networking site of some sort. You’re a part of that number. And as our world grows increasingly connected, and the need and ability to share [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

What does it mean to be an introvert online?

Photo by AshtonPal, CC. Click on image for license and information.

Did you take public transportation today? And where did you sit? Did you take the seat on the end? What about your phone at work? Did it actually ring today? Did you let it go to voicemail? In fact, do you prefer responding to emails over talking on the phone? Or maybe you went out—and [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

What Differentiates a Twitter Mob from a Twitter Mob?

What defines a mob? | Image by jinterwas, CC.

Brevity may be the soul of wit, but what does wit matter if no one’s listening? On Twitter the potential exists for many people to listen even if they aren’t connected. The reach of Twitter creates the possibility of a shared experience that extends well beyond the immediate network of a user: When the Japanese [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

#NYCSciTweetUp is Coming!

What are you doing next Thursday? I’ll tell you what—if you live in the New York City area, you’re going to the #NYCSciTweetUp! Join the gang on March 29th, at the Peculier Pub in NYC for an informal evening of science and networking.. Updated details can always be found on the Facebook page. And as per [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

There’s More to That Red Plastic Cup Than You Thought

Raise your cup. | Creative Commons. Photo by John W. Iwanski. Click on image for license and link.

Who here has not enjoyed a cold, refreshing drink from a red plastic cup? Alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages alike find themselves comfortably enclosed within the confines of the bright red vessel that has become a ubiquitous American staple at barbecues, picnics, parties, in dugouts and at minor league games, in food cars and at lunch [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

Mourning Digitally

Sleepy Hollow Graveyard. Photo by KDCosta, December 2011.

Ed Note: Another flashback from the archives of AiP this Friday, though a sombre one at that. It’s rainy and dreary here in New York City, and my thoughts are a bit dark today. How are social technologies changing the experience of death for those charged with remembering? Death has been referred to as the [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

AiP Stands With Context and Variation

My SciAm colleague and friend Kate Clancy of Context and Variation has been the target of disturbing trollish behavior recently. She is experiencing what many female bloggers do at some point while writing for an online audience and she’s rallying her community by speaking candidly about her experiences: Even when the threats aren’t physical, the [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

It Takes a (Virtual) Village

You know the old saying that parenting doesn’t come with a handbook? Well, maybe it doesn’t need one—there’s Facebook. In many ways I feel as though I’m watching the children of some of my friends grow up on Facebook. I’ve been with them from their first status update (e.g., “Introducing Jane Smith at 7lbs, 6oz [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

The Ways We Talk About Pain

Excerpts from the Personal Journal of Krystal D’Costa [i] Tuesday: I fell. Again. This time it was while getting out of the car. I’m not sure how I managed it. I got my foot caught on the door jamb and tumbled forward. I hit my shin—hard—against the door jamb and I think I tweaked my [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

#NYCSciTweetUp and The Story Collider Together—TOMORROW!

Tomorrow the #NYCSciTweetUp and The Story Collider will partner for an evening of science, stories, and beer! The Story Collider invites people to share the roles that science has played in their lives. From humble beginnings like the #NYCSciTweetUp, The Story Collider has grown immensely, attracting a diverse showing that highlights the broad, and sometimes [...]

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Molecules to Medicine

From Tel Aviv to Boston Bombings: Connections at TEDMED

Of the roller coaster of emotions that has marked the past few weeks, personally and for the nation, one talk at TEDMED tied them all together for me, with the theme of our interdependence and how much we can accomplish if we work together. I’d like to share with you several seemingly unrelated events, with [...]

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Molecules to Medicine

Hospital merger déjà vu

For past decades I’ve vacationed in mid-coast Maine, an enjoyable respite from sweltering Washington, D.C. weather. When I returned to Boothbay Harbor last week, I was dismayed to learn that local St. Andrews hospital will be closing its emergency room, part of its merger with Miles Hospital in Damariscotta, 20 miles away. While I have [...]

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Plugged In

Energy and Community – “Let’s meet at the clothes line”

450px-Clothes_line_with_pegs_nearby

Lowering your thermostat setting to decrease your monthly power bill seems simple enough, until your roommate says the magic words, “I’m cold”. Suddenly, that extra sweater and socks go from being an acceptable solution to the chill to an inadequate bandaid on a bigger problem. You are now facing the tough choice – try to [...]

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Plugged In

Designing Our Own Neighborhoods

After a half-century of brutal urban renewal, sidewalkless cul de sacs, and unwalkable sprawl, planners all over the world have turned towards what was left out of planning for decades: community. Whether it’s planning approaches like Complete Streets or assessment methods like walkability scores, communities have learned that people want to interact with their surroundings [...]

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