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"bioethics"13 articles archived since 1845

uBiome: Ethical Lapse or Not?

uBiome's CEO, Jessica Richman, seems to me to be a great saleswoman who also excels at sounding innocent and playing the misunderstood victim in the ethical controversy surrounding her company.

July 25, 2013 — Judy Stone
Antibiotic resistance-another view from the trenches

Antibiotic resistance-another view from the trenches

Remember the story of the elephant and the blind men? I feel I am revisiting it whenever I go back and work another stretch in the hospital as an infectious diseases physician.

August 14, 2013 — Judy Stone

Ebola and Priorities in Drug Development

News is rapidly changing regarding Ebola. Even as I've been writing this post, we've gone from "There is no treatment except supportive care" to NIH's Dr.

August 5, 2014 — Judy Stone
Ebola – the World’s Katrina

Ebola – the World’s Katrina

To anyone who follows infectious disease outbreaks, it is no great surprise that the most immediate, looming threat, Ebola, has received scant attention until recently.

September 9, 2014 — Judy Stone
UMN: How many deaths have occurred during your clinical trials?

UMN: How many deaths have occurred during your clinical trials?

This series uses the story of Dan Markingson's participation in a clinical trial of anti-psychotic drugs at the University of Minnesota, his suicide in 2004 while participating on the study, and subsequent events as a case study in which to explore various aspects of clinical trial conduct.

May 8, 2014 — Judy Stone
An Ethics Conference Where an Expert Gets it Wrong

An Ethics Conference Where an Expert Gets it Wrong

There was an interesting array of topics at last week's Advancing Ethical Research conference sponsored by Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research (PRIMR), ranging from basics of Institutional Review Boards (IRB) to ethics of Ebola trials, which was excellent.

December 15, 2014 — Judy Stone

Quarantines: Chaos and Confusion

There has been a quantum change in the past few days as to how healthcare workers (HCW) returning from the West African countries of Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone are being treated.

October 28, 2014 — Judy Stone
What do the UMN and Disney Have in Common?

What do the UMN and Disney Have in Common?

This research ethics series uses the story of Dan Markingson’s participation in a clinical trial of anti-psychotic drugs at the University of Minnesota, his suicide 2004 while participating on the study, and subsequent events as a case study in which to explore various aspects of clinical trial conduct.

November 25, 2013 — Judy Stone

Muddled about MERS? Here's A Quick Guide

While I was working on the “H1N-What?” post, I also knew there would soon be questions about MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome), just as there were about SARS.

May 5, 2014 — Judy Stone

Should Prisoners Be Used in Medical Experiments?

History is rife with unethical experiments on inmates. But with proper safeguards prisoner studies may hold the key to the accurate representation of vulnerable groups and lead to health benefits

July 2, 2014 — Dina Fine Maron