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Posts Tagged "Neurology"

MIND Guest Blog

Can a Mnemonic Slow Age-Based Memory Loss?

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One of the tragedies of aging is the slow but steady decline in memory. Phone numbers slipping your mind? Forgetting crucial items on your grocery list? Opening the door but can’t remember why? Up to 50 percent of adults aged 64 years or older report memory complaints. For many of us, senile moments are the [...]

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Observations

Neuroscientists Can Stumble When They Make Conclusions from Examining Single Patients

Our current understanding of how the brain works often borrows from observations of the anomalous patient. The iron rod that penetrated Phineas Gage’s head made the once emotionally balanced railroad foreman impulsive and profane. But it gave neurologists clues as to the role of the brain’s frontal lobes in exercising self-control. The epilepsy surgery that [...]

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Observations

Let’s Retire the Phrase: “We Need a Moon Shot to…[Fill in the Blank]“

In late May, Patrick Kennedy, the former congressman and the son of the late Sen. Edward Kennedy, gathered a group of luminaries to launch "One Mind for Research," which coincided with the fiftieth anniversary of his uncle’s call to trek to our natural satellite. This "moon shot" for the brain was intended as a targeted [...]

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Talking back

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Hip-Hop

There’s a brand new dance that’s sweepin’ the nation by the National Stroke Association … … For those who can dance and clap your hands to it… One arm as you slur every word you speak. Imitate like you’re paralyzed and weak… Walkin’ funny … stagger unsteady. Stand in a line and pretend that you’re [...]

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Talking back

A Neurodegenerative Disease Improves Facets of Cognition

Huntington’ disease, which killed folk singer Woody Guthrie, seems to put into overdrive the main chemical that turns on brain cells, ultimately leading to their death. The normal function of the neurotransmitter glutamate, the chemical overproduced in Huntington’s, is also intimately involved with learning. Researchers from Ruhr University and the University of Dortmund in Germany [...]

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