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Posts Tagged "human behavior"

MIND Guest Blog

Internet Addiction: Real or Virtual Reality?

Credit: Sam Wolff via Flickr

In 1995, Ivan Goldberg, a New York psychiatrist, published one of the first diagnostic tests for Internet Addiction Disorder. The criteria appeared on psycom.net, a psychiatry bulletin board, and began with an air of earnest authenticity: “A maladaptive pattern of Internet use, leading to clinically significant impairment or distress as manifested by three (or more) [...]

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MIND Guest Blog

Plenty of Pheromones in the Sea

As we sat in my car outside a silent movie theater in Los Angeles, my friend anxiously opened a plastic bag containing a white T-shirt she’d slept in for the past three nights. “Does it smell like me?” she asked nervously, gesturing the open end toward my face. I stuck my nose into the bag [...]

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The Urban Scientist

You Should Know: July 29, 1972 Important date in Bioethics, Science and Black History

Dr. Breland Noble and Dr. Benjamin

The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment was an infamous clinical study that began in 1932, conducted by the Public Health Service at the Tuskegee Institute. July 29, 1972, it was revealed to the world and it came to an end. Peter Buxton, US Public Health Service worker had filed several reports about this unethical research. He blew [...]

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The Urban Scientist

You Should Know: Dr Robin G Nelson

spotlight-searchlight-RGN

Welcome to the tenth installment of You Should Know, where I give my own #ScholarSunday salute to Science Bloggers and Blogs you may not yet know about. Introducing … Dr. Robin G. Nelson Dr. Nelson is a Biological Anthropologist whose research explores family dynamics and how they may impact the health of individuals and communities. She [...]

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The Urban Scientist

Long time coming: African-American Civil Rights Organizations embrace Environmentalism

DNLee with Majora Carter

When I started blogging 8 years ago, the blogosphere like a lonely place. I hadn’t yet met another Black Science blogger (and I wouldn’t come across another one for 2.5 years), so when I rolled out the Green Carpet for Earth Day, I felt my voice was puny. This wasn’t a revelation. I seemed to [...]

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The Urban Scientist

#DispatchesDNLee: Tanzania from A to Z – Driving in Tanzania

An over turn tanker on Tanzanian road I encountered on my first day in Tanzania

D is for Driving. Driving in Tanzania was its own challenge.  For my perspective (American) everything was completely different.  They drive on the left side of the road (European-style). With little exception, there are only two lanes – on the highway, in the city, everywhere. The lanes are narrow, sometimes there is a median but [...]

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The Urban Scientist

#DispatchesDNLee: In Tanzania, Reflecting on World Malaria Day

My arsenal: The Family Care OFF doesn't work on African Mosquitos. This product contains Picaridin and judging from my feet, ankles and legs means nothing to these local skeeters.

Today, April 25, 2013 is World Malaria Day. I learned about Malaria in junior high school. Along with Yellow Fever and the Flu of 1918 these were the headline diseases we learned about in Health Class. Later in high school biology and social studies courses, I learned about these diseases again. In college I learned [...]

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The Urban Scientist

#DispatchesDNLee: Tanzania from A to Z – Cell Phone Technology

Nokia cell phone Africa

During my visit to Tanzania in Summer 2012, I began a series of posts sharing my experiences in Tanzania from A to Z. C is for Cell Phone Technology I attended the Blogging from Developing Nations Panel at ScienceOnline 2012, to prepare for my visit to Tanzania.  I wanted to get an idea of what [...]

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The Urban Scientist

In defense of Michael Vick’s right to tell his whole story

M Vick Finally Free books

The Mandingo fight scene of Django Unchained really disturbed me.  Two men were fighting for their lives. They were not competing over resources for survival, like food or shelter or access to mates or to protect their young. No, they were fighting for the entertainment of others. (This is not natural, might I add.)  They [...]

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The Urban Scientist

Obesity Coverage in Black Newspapers Mostly Negative, University of Missouri Study Finds

MU Obesity Coverage

Why my campaign to promote quality and relevant science news in the Black Press matters: Real outcomes are at stake. Science Literacy is Social Justice! Obesity Coverage in Black Newspapers is Mostly Negative, MU Study Finds Negative health stories could discourage men in the African-American community from taking action Feb. 14, 2013 Story Contact(s): Nathan [...]

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The Urban Scientist

Hip Hop Evolution Files: What’s so special about tight vaginas?

Keri Hilson with Lil Wayne Lil Wayne’s monologue really says it all: mami i dig your persona right, you look baby mama type, i know that got you kinda hyped, my ice is albino white, i hope your vagina tight i go underwater and i hope your piranha bite hahaha Why does vagina muscle tone [...]

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The Urban Scientist

The complicated relationship of Economics & Education and how we conflate race & class issues in the United States

So even after Affirmative Action, there still weren’t very many Blacks and Mexican students enrolled in selective colleges and universities. Why? Because they didn’t meet the entry standards. That makes sense. But what isn’t thoroughly addressed (in this clip) is the reason why. Professor Lino Graglia admits he is not exactly sure why idea why [...]

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