ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network

Posts Tagged "Aging"

@ScientificAmerican

Don’t Forget Our New E-Book, Remember When? The Science of Memory

Remember When? The Science of Memory

Why can you vividly recall the day your father took you to your first baseball game many years ago, but you can’t remember where you just put the car keys? We tend not to think about it much, but memory is the seat of consciousness. The process of how we remember, how we forget, and [...]

Keep reading »
@ScientificAmerican

New E-Book Forever Young: The Science of Aging Investigates Longevity

Forever Young: The Science of Aging

An infant born in the U.S. today will probably live to see his or her 78th birthday, a 20- year-plus increase over the average lifespan a century ago. As living well into our 80s and 90s becomes more attainable, how many more years can humanity expect to gain going forward? The two main physiological barriers [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Aging: Too Much Telomerase Can Be as Bad as Too Little

How do I knock off thirty years from my age? Faust, the protagonist in Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s famous play, poses this question to Mephistopheles in the chapter Hexenküche (Witches’ kitchen). Mephistopheles provides some pretty good advice – considering that he is the devil and this fictitious exchange takes place in the dark Middle Ages: Begib [...]

Keep reading »
MIND Guest Blog

Can a Mnemonic Slow Age-Based Memory Loss?

basketball court - plant artist composite

One of the tragedies of aging is the slow but steady decline in memory. Phone numbers slipping your mind? Forgetting crucial items on your grocery list? Opening the door but can’t remember why? Up to 50 percent of adults aged 64 years or older report memory complaints. For many of us, senile moments are the [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

What a Ball of Wool Can Tell You about Healthy Aging [Video]

Doctors can perform plenty of tests to tell you how sick you are. There are certain agreed-on measurements of blood pressure, glucose levels or biomarkers to define illness. But what are the objective measures that indicate how healthy a person is? For that matter, what sort of test can you do to reliably indicate that [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

The Quest: 6 Facts about Aging and Aging Research

Fact #1: With about $2.5 billion in annual funding, aging research is in the top 20 research categories supported by the National Institutes of Health.* That gives me another opportunity to test my contention that taking a couple of seconds to think about where to start searching for medical information instead of automatically calling up [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Davos: X Marks the Unknown

Earlier this month, the World Economic Forum published its annual report on global risks, “Global Risks 2013: Eighth Edition.” At the 2013 WEF meeting at Davos, a session focused on emerging threats, called “X Factors: Preparing for the Unknown.” My colleague Philip Campbell, the editor in chief of Nature, and his colleague editors, identified these [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Major Phobias Might Hasten Aging

phobias might cause premature aging

Do you get panicky in wide-open spaces? Tight, closed ones? What about in high places or—eek!—around arachnids? If these fears are frequent or debilitating, you might have a phobic anxiety. And you would not be alone—at least 8 percent of Americans have at least one. All of this psychological stress could be taking a toll [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Obama’s War on Alzheimer’s: Will We Be Able to Treat the Disease by 2025?

Government declarations of war on drugs or disease often end in losing battles. That’s why the news that the Obama Administration’s drafting of a plan that targets 2025 as a goal for preventing or treating Alzheimer’s met with skepticism in some quarters. “No one set a deadline for the ‘War on cancer’ or in the [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

What Unusually Long-Lived Animals Tell Us about Human Aging

As I was editing David Stipp’s article “A New Path to Longevity” for the January 2012 issue of Scientific American, Stipp told me about some intriguing research into unusually long-lived mammals. Investigators are studying such animals to better understand why the adult human body deteriorates with age and how to intervene in the process. David [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Training Could Rescue a Failing Sense of Smell

smelling rose

Weakening eyesight can be sharpened with lenses, and impaired hearing can be improved with aids. What about a failing sense of smell? Detecting and distinguishing the floral bouquet of fresh honey or the miasma of bad lunchmeat might not seem quite as critical for day-to-day existence as sight or hearing. But what the nose knows [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

For “Super Agers,” Bodies Age as Brains Stay Young

old person smoking

A nasty affliction sets into humans as they advance in years. The hair either disappears or thins into a fuzzy halo, the skin sags and bunches, while inside the brain, changes set in that slow our reaction times and cause our memories to fade. A steady, widespread thinning out of the brain’s cortex, the outermost [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

Alzheimer’s Risk Linked to Common Complaints, from Poor Eyesight to Denture Trouble

As we age, all sorts of things may start to break down. Joints ache, or vision fails, and or maybe cognitive abilities falter. The leading known risk for getting Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia is simply getting older, followed, some studies suggest, by major illnesses, such as diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure [...]

Keep reading »
Observations

It’s getting better all the time: Happiness, well-being increase after 50

happiness wellbeing increase after 50 decrease stress worry anger

Despite weighty concerns such as aging, planning for retirement or caring for older friends and family, people in the U.S. seem to get happier with age. A new study reports that these changes are consistent regardless of whether individuals were employed, had young children at home or lived with a partner. General well-being (characterized by [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

How Well Will You Age?

14-022FEATURE

When we’re young, we quietly take stock of those around us and reject notions that we will eventually gain weight, deflate, wrinkle and sag. When we’re old, we reminisce about the smooth, taut and strong bodies of our youth. You can look to your relatives for rough facsimiles of how you might age, but ultimately, [...]

Keep reading »
Talking back

Gold Standard Trial Affirms Role of Diet, Exercise and Such to Prevent Dementia

In 2010, the National Institutes of Health held a conference to determine what measures, including behavioral steps like exercise and diet, could be taken to reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s. A report prepared specifically for that conference by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) made an assessment of  the existing evidence for preventive [...]

Keep reading »
Talking back

Just 1 Rock Concert or Football Game May Cause Permanent Hearing Damage

A single exposure to loud but not deafening noise may be enough to precipitate irreparable harm to nerves in the auditory system. This is the take-home from a new line of research that may help explain why many people, particularly as they age, have difficulty in picking out a conversation from the wall of background [...]

Keep reading »
Talking back

Early Trial of Doctor’s Office Test to Predict Dementia Before First Symptoms

Until very recently, the only way to provide a firm diagnosis of Alzheimer’s was through a brain autopsy. Things are starting to change. Brain imaging and spinal taps have now started to look for the plaques and tangles that are the hallmarks of the neurodegenerative disease in living patients. These techniques are now being tested [...]

Keep reading »

More from Scientific American

Scientific American Special Universe

Get the latest Special Collector's edition

Secrets of the Universe: Past, Present, Future

Order Now >

X

Email this Article

X