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Posts Tagged "science writing"

@ScientificAmerican

Young Science Journalists Take to the Zoo

Thirteen budding young German science writers recently grilled veteran scribes to learn more about the field during a three-day workshop “The Intelligence of Animals” run by Spektrum der Wissenchaft. Spektrum is the name of Scientific American‘s edition in Germany. The young reporters, “Wissensschreibers,” between 12 and 16 years old, learned about the essential skills of science [...]

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Life, Unbounded

In Defense Of Metaphors In Science Writing

(James Gillray)

“Science is all metaphor” Timothy Leary We live in an elegant universe. The cosmos is like a string symphony. Genes are selfish. There is an endless battle between thermodynamics and gravity. Do you love these statements, or hate them? The reading world gets pretty divided over whether or not it’s okay to apply metaphors and [...]

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Life, Unbounded

So You’re a Scientist Wanting to Write a Popular Science Book?

Be prepared...

About three years ago I had an epiphany, or maybe it was a small bout of lunacy. I realized that I wanted to try to write a real book – something that wasn’t just another peer-reviewed journal article reporting the minutiae of a piece of research that precisely ten other people on the planet were [...]

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Not bad science

How To Get Into Science Communication Online

pic1

I recently taught a class on science journalism and science communication. Although there have been a few articles on this topic already (in particular I’d recommend reading Ed Yong’s and Carl Zimmer’s) I thought I’d share a bit of advice from my own experience. I became involved in science writing just a few years ago, [...]

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Symbiartic

Who Needs a Paintbrush When You Can Use a Dead Fish?

13-015FEATURE

James Prosek is a person who continually challenges the neat categories we create to delineate where one discipline ends and another begins. In his own words: I want to be able to be a writer and a painter and an illustrator and a sculptor and not have to be confined by the taxonomies of art [...]

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Symbiartic

Can You Scaiku?

naturally dyed easter eggs

A couple weeks ago, I was reminded how much I enjoy the poetry format known as haiku. On a whim, I threw out a tweet soliciting #scaiku, science-themed haiku, to see what delights my tweeps would come up with. Some made me laugh out loud: This one time at lab we dropped acid and then [...]

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Symbiartic

Alone in the blogiverse: where are all the space-art bloggers?

Eskimo Nebula © Katy Ann Chalmers

Where are all the space-art bloggers?  When Symbiartic was in the planning stages, this was a post I knew I had to write. There are so few I found it at first surprising.  Do the images from the Hubble trump inspiration in painters?  Is interest in space waning compared to say, paleontology? Science inspired art [...]

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Symbiartic

The DNA Hall of Shame

image of Left-handed DNA

Confession time. Illustrators are people, too. And by that I mean they bring assumptions to the table at the outset of every project. There’s no avoiding it – no matter how educated and experienced you are, you can’t know it all. That is why it is so critical for researchers and editors to be intimately [...]

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The Urban Scientist

Wordless Wednesday: #madwriting all the live long day

#madwriting

This is pretty much ALL I’ve been doing day in and day out for several weeks now. Writing, Editing, Revising, Reading references, Re-reading references, Writing some more, etc. I’m focusing on the first manuscript from the Pouched Rat research I’ve been doing the last 2.x years. I’ve hammered out an Intro, Methods, and Results I [...]

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The Urban Scientist

Wordless Wednesday: Research Snapshots 4

Snack time.

Because I know you all have missed seeing the rats. Here are some photos of the most adorable research subjects, EVER!! These photos are from novel food introduction tests.   He has a treat (the green alfalfa cube in the lower right part of the frame) but he is getting into pre-nap posture. Hey, I’m [...]

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The Urban Scientist

#DivSciWri I need a social media intern. Are you interested?

DNLee at the iPad

My hands are full. Life and research are busy. If I learned nothing else in Dissertation Support Group, then I at least learned the importance of asking for help when you need it. I need help. I would like to take on a social media intern to help me stay on top of this little [...]

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The Urban Scientist

Racism in Porn industry is newsworthy, so how can science make the cut?

  I saw a tweet for this article this morning, April 3, 2013.  I read the byline and realized that it was an original article written for The Root. It was not a wire story with a link to an article originally published somewhere else (like many of their pieces). No, this was a very [...]

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The Urban Scientist

Next steps in Science and Journalism bridge-building #scisplain #journosplain

Jacquelyn Gill at The Contemplative Mammoth offers 5 key tips to answer: How can scientists actively engage with the media? Some of us have been banging our heads to the wall trying to make inroads. Inspired by the SciJourn misfire at ScienceOnline 2013, a handful of us decided to meet On Air to hash it out.  [...]

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The Urban Scientist

African-American Science Bloggers, Writers, and Tweeters

I’m still continuing my crusade to shine the spotlight on Top STEM Professionals of Color.  Today, I’m sharing my list (and hyperlinks) of African-American Science Bloggers, Writers, and Tweeters.  And I’m doing this in conjunction with the announcements of the 2012 Black Weblog Award categories.  It’s a nice spread of categories and I am happy [...]

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The Urban Scientist

Science Writing – Academic & Creatively

chalkboard

It’s time to step my game up.  I mean that seriously.  I look at my CV or when I have a very honest and conversation with my old lab mate: we always come to the sobering conclusion The writing is on the wall. I have a demon.  Writing has always been my nemesis.  I know, [...]

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