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Posts Tagged "methane"

Dog Spies

Dog Farts Blow Up Building

COW-FART-ELITE-DAILY11

Well, not quite. But maybe they wrecked a few Dog Fart Suits. But did cow farts blow up a building in Germany? Or is that just an April Fools joke? Read here to find out. ~~~ Image: ‘I’m gassy and I know it‘ used with permission: Tyler Gildin and Elite Daily. References Motupalli P (2013) [...]

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Dog Spies

Well That Stinks! Reporters Blow Cow Farts Out Of Proportion

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Apparently cows are terrorists too. Last month, journalists reported—in what can only be described as a “chicken-run” scenario of cows plotting their big escape—that a herd of dairy cows in central Germany caused an explosion in their housing facility. Police failed to thwart the plan, as the explosion seemed to be caused by flatulence. Yes, [...]

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Life, Unbounded

Astrobiology Roundup

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                      Lots of new scientific results in the past couple of weeks feed directly into the central questions of astrobiology – from the search for life, to the environment of interplanetary and interstellar space, and the grand cosmological terrain we find ourselves in. No Methane [...]

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Life, Unbounded

The Long Hard Road to Mars

curiosity_small

Starting this Saturday, a 24 day window of opportunity opens for the launch of NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory, now also known as the Curiosity rover. If all goes well (very well) then in August 2012 a new visitor will barrel down into the martian atmosphere through a six-and-a-half minute maneuver involving hypersonic speeds, air-braking, parachutes, [...]

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Observations

Google’s Cars Sniff Out Natural Gas Leaks to Deliver Cleaner Air

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Of all the things to be leaking methane on Staten Island in New York City—corroded gas pipes, sewers, the Fresh Kills dump—who would have suspected the mail truck? But as I circled a Staten Island neighborhood in a specially equipped Google car, it was a parked mail truck that proved to be sending the biggest [...]

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Observations

The Climate May Be Changing, but the IPCC Remains the Same

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By 2021, climate scientists should be 99 percent certain that climate change is our fault—up from 95 percent certain presently and a mere 90 percent certain all the way back in 2007. This conclusion of the leaked draft of the forthcoming assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) begs the question: Is any of [...]

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Observations

Obama Has a Plan for Climate, What If It Involves Tar Sands?

obama-oval-office-6-25-2013

On a sweltering day in Washington, D.C., President Barack Obama sweated as he laid out his new plan to combat climate change. In addition to the mandatory cuts in CO2 pollution from coal-fired power plants and the efforts to protect the country from the ravages of climate change highlighted by my colleague Mark Fischetti, Obama [...]

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Observations

Oil Companies May Have Been Helping Combat Climate Change (a Little)

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Here’s some good news about climate change: emissions of greenhouse gases other than carbon dioxide have slowed and, in some cases, begun to decline. That means fewer molecules drifting in the atmosphere and blocking the escape of heat radiated by an Earth warmed by sunlight. The bad news is no one knows why. Now a [...]

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Observations

Deny This: Contested Himalayan Glaciers Really Are Melting, and Doing So at a Rapid Pace–Kind of Like Climate Change

tibetan-plateau

Remember when climate change contrarians professed outrage over a few errors in the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s last report? One of their favorite such mistakes involved an overestimation of the pace at which glaciers would melt at the “Third Pole,” where the Indian subcontinent crashes into Asia. Some contrarians back in 2010 proceeded [...]

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Observations

Fracking Could Work If Industry Would Come Clean

VANCOUVER—Resistance to hydraulic fracturing in the U.S. has risen steadily in recent months. Citizens and politicians are worried that fracking deep shales to extract natural gas can contaminate groundwater, trigger earthquakes and release methane, the potent greenhouse gas, into the atmosphere. But a panel of experts not tied to industry told a large audience at [...]

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Plugged In

EPA “got it right” on more stringent methane regulations

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One of the big takeaway from the big UT Austin/Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) methane leakage study released today is emissions rates are actually lower in some parts of the production process than initially thought. For wellheads surveyed as part of the study, two-thirds of the wells had new emissions capture control technology installed, so-called “green [...]

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Plugged In

Switching from coal to natural gas may be better for the climate than previously thought: new measurements see lower fugitive emissions from fracking

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A new study finds that methane emissions from shale gas production are nearly 50 times lower than previous estimates, improving the climate benefit of switching from coal to natural gas.

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Plugged In

California’s Second Carbon Auction Today: An Explainer on Cap-and-Trade

Photo courtesy of California Air Resources Board

At the beginning of this year, the Golden State officially launched its long-discussed market-based system to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. California’s GHG cap-and-trade program is not the first of its type. Carbon trading schemes are popping up around the world. But, it’s only the second program to takeoff in the U.S. The first, the [...]

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Plugged In

Light on Landfills: Solar energy covers turn maxed-out landfills into solar farms

Hickory Ridge landfill outside of Atlanta, GA, is full. Like most landfills that reach capacity, it was capped to contain its noxious mix of debris that will slowly degrade over the decades and centuries to come. But unlike most, Hickory Ridge glistens on a sunny day due its over 7,000 thin-film photovoltaic solar panels plastered [...]

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Plugged In

Maybe … a Half of a Cheer for Shale Gas? Maybe?

I had a whole post prepared about how the Geographic Information Services people helped in the response to the April tornados that devastated Raleigh, which seemed like a good way to introduce the infrastructure-plus-connectivity-plus-how-do-they-DO-that? applied science take I hope to bring to this blog, but then I came back from vacation and opened the newspapers [...]

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