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"pathology"

Bacteria that could pass as X-men: part 2

Bacteria that could pass as X-men: part 2

Second part of my thinly veiled excuse to research X-men and call it work. The first post can be found here. This is only meant to be a two-parter but I’ll see how I feel on Monday, and whether I can find any more X-men that are as amazing as bacteria.

December 16, 2011 — S.E. Gould

Fussy eaters: the favoured food of Salmonella

As antibiotic resistance increases the search for new anti-bacterial treatments becomes more and more important. One way to design anti-bacterials is to find specific biochemical pathways that the bacteria require to survive, and develop drugs that block off these pathways.

July 13, 2014 — S.E. Gould
The pathogen detectives: sourcing the post-earthquake cholera outbreak in Haiti

The pathogen detectives: sourcing the post-earthquake cholera outbreak in Haiti

Natural disasters such as earthquakes can have far-reaching effects beyond the damage caused on the day they occur. The 2010 earthquake in Haiti damaged the already limited sanitation systems leading to areas without adequate toilet and washing facilities; perfect for the spread of infection diseases.

April 6, 2014 — S.E. Gould
Glowing fungi for studying infectious diseases

Glowing fungi for studying infectious diseases

When studying how infections grow and spread it is always helpful to be able to see the organism causing the disease. There are currently a range of microbial and labelling techniques available to view micro-organisms within the cells they infect, and one of the most useful is bioluminescence imaging.

August 3, 2014 — S.E. Gould
The bacteriophages of tuberculosis

The bacteriophages of tuberculosis

I’ve written previously about bacteriophages, the viruses that infect bacteria, and I studied them for my first lab project. So I was pretty excited by a lovely little pearl in PLoS Pathogens last month discussing mycobacteriophages; the viruses that specifically attack mycobacteria.

April 29, 2014 — S.E. Gould
Evolving proteins – no DNA required

Evolving proteins – no DNA required

Prions are the infective agents that cause transmissible spongiform encephalopathies such as Mad Cow Disease in humans. All prions affect the brain or neural tissues and are currently untreatable.

January 5, 2014 — S.E. Gould
Sleeping sickness and tsetse flies

Sleeping sickness and tsetse flies

Although this blog focus mostly on bacteria, I do occasionally dip out of my comfort zone into other infectious elements such as viruses, prions and fungi.

June 1, 2014 — S.E. Gould
Genes for antibiotic resistance

Genes for antibiotic resistance

Ever since the discovery and marketing of penicillin in 1928 by Alexander Fleming, bacteria have been developing resistance to antibiotics at an alarming rate.

September 13, 2011 — S.E. Gould
The SOS response: how bacteria deal with damaged DNA

The SOS response: how bacteria deal with damaged DNA

DNA is important stuff. It’s present in all living organisms on the planet (or ‘almost all’ if you wish to remain friends with virologists) and contains the information required to produce and organise the proteins within a cell.

December 22, 2013 — S.E. Gould

The bacteria in breast milk

Bacteria are found in large numbers all over the human body where there is a channel to the outside world, for example in the gut, lungs, and surface of the skin.

December 8, 2013 — S.E. Gould
Bacteria that could pass as X-men: part 1

Bacteria that could pass as X-men: part 1

This idea for a post has been kicking around in my head for a while now. As I’ve been finding blogging hard to get into recently, this should kick-start me back into it by letting me write about comics as well as science.

December 15, 2011 — S.E. Gould

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