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Posts Tagged "Guest post"

Culturing Science

Why Do Sequences Think They Are So Special?

De_Revolutionibus_manuscript_small

We know that the living world depends on sequences of nucleic acids for its existence and ongoing operation. We also know that humans evolved the ability to create, manipulate, and copy acoustic sequences, and later to commit those sequences to the more permanent medium of writing. Finally, we know that our advanced technological civilization is increasingly dependent on storing, moving, and processing bit strings—sequences of zeros and ones. So what is it with sequences?

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Lab Rat

Guest post: I am my mother’s chimera

A tortoiseshell shorthair cat, image from wikimedia commons.

This weeks post is a guest post from the wonderful E.E. Giorgi who blogs at: http://chimerasthebooks.blogspot.co.uk/ I AM MY MOTHER’S CHIMERA. CHANCES ARE, SO ARE YOU For years now the concept of a “genetic chimera” has sparked the imagination of writers: the idea that an individual could harbor his/her own twin is creepy and intriguing at the [...]

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Lab Rat

The manipulative friend: bacterial hijacking of plant symbiosis signalling

sarah image 1

The post this week is part of  a blog-swap with Sarah Shailes (@SarahShailes) of the Plant Scientist blog. You can read my post on plant defences against bacteria over at her blog. Members of the legume family of plants (e.g. peas, soybean) can form symbioses with nitrogen-fixing bacteria known as rhizobia. In return for receiving [...]

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Lab Rat

Guest post: Bricks of knowledge

The Copenhagen iGEM team

While I’m getting used to my new arrival the iGEM Team from Copenhagen have kindly provided a great guest post about their work over the summer. Further information about their project can be found on the Copenhagen iGEM team website. iGEM Team Copenhagen: Paying it forward to future iGEM’ers with ‘Bricks of Knowledge’ Inspired by [...]

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Lab Rat

Guest Post: Flesh-eating bacteria

High magnification micrograph of necrotizing fasciitis. H&E stain - the purple sections are bacteria. Image credit below.

I’m having a bit of a break this weekend catching up with my Dads-in-law. I’m pleased to present a guest post from Andy Wang who works as a Microbiology Research Associate at Emeryville Pharmaceutical Services. Flesh Eating Bacteria Can Infect Anyone – What You Should Know What is it? Necrotizing fasciitis, commonly known as flesh eating [...]

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Lab Rat

iGEM Buenos Aires: Synthetic bacterial communities

Image from iGEM Team Buenos Aires

Each year, the iGEM competition encourages undergraduates from all over the world to create synthetic bacterial machines by organising modular pieces of genome. This is a guest post from the iGEM team in Buenos Aires about the competition and their project. We are happy to be presented as the first team from Argentina to participate [...]

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Lab Rat

The mainstream fronts of Synthetic Biology: Guest post

The iGEM logo

This is a guest post from M. A. Loera Sánchez from the iGEM team UANL 2012. I have carried out a few small grammar edits but otherwise the essay is all his work, and I would like to thank him for the opportunity to host it on my blog. All references are below the main [...]

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Lab Rat

Guest post – Microbes and Madness

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Last post of the honeymoon! I think it’s fitting that this post should be an old guest post written by my husband. He’s a psychiatrist, and this post was the only way we could think of to combine his medical knowledge with my love for little bacteria. I should also give his book a plug [...]

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Lab Rat

Using bacteria to help prevent soil erosion – guest post from the iGEM Regional Champions

Bacteria releasing auxin, a chemical that encourages plants to develop roots and grow deep into the soil.

This is a guest post from a member of the iGEM competition team from Imperial College London. They recently won the iGEM regional championships and will be going to Boston in November to compete for the Worldwide Championships. This post describes the work they did over the summer, and how they found the iGEM experience. [...]

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Oscillator

Which bacteria are in my poop? It depends where you look…

Figure 1: Sampling strategy

This is a guest post from my friend and former colleague Tami Lieberman. She’s a postdoc in the Kishony Lab in the Department of Systems Biology at the Harvard Medical School, and you follow her on twitter @conTAMInatedsci. As a recently minted PhD, I study the evolution of bacteria during infection. I want to better [...]

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Symbiartic

Slippin’ and Slidin’ – Guest Post by Michele Banks

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Recently, artist Michele Banks (better known as @artologica) told me she was trying out Yupo and mylar with her watercolours. I was excited to ask her to share the results here on Symbiartic. Banks has been seen and interviewed here on Symbiartic before, and in addition to running one of the most popular science-art Etsy [...]

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Symbiartic

Painting With Chimps

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[It's with great pleasure the Symbiartic team is featuring this Guest Post by illustrator Nathaniel Gold. Gold is the artist behind the wonderful illustrations found on The Primate Diaries by Eric Michael Johnson, and has twice been featured as Image of the Week (once, twice) here on the Scientific American Blog Network. I was excited [...]

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Symbiartic

Something in the Air: Smog on Display

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Today on Symbiartic, we’re happy to present a Guest Post by Lisa Gardiner. – - In an effort to turn the proverbial lemons into lemonade, Los Angeles-based artist Kim Abeles is turning air pollution into art. For her current exhibit in Boulder, Colorado, Kim worked with middle school students to capture and create art from [...]

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