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Information Culture

Information Culture

Thoughts and analysis related to science information, data, publication and culture.

  • So long, Scientific American, and thanks for all the fish

    So long, Scientific American, and thanks for all the fish

    By Bonnie Swoger | December 15, 2014 |

    The editors at Scientific American have decided to go in another direction with their blog network. As a result, our Information Culture blog will no longer be hosted on this network. We will continue to blog about the scientific literature, data sharing and the culture of science communication at our new site, http://informationculture.org Those interested in receiving notifications about new posts can subscribe via RSS or via email (right hand side of the page). […]

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  • Is Nature’s “free to view” program a step back for open access?

    Is Nature’s “free to view” program a step back for open access?

    By Bonnie Swoger | December 2, 2014 |

    News articles about scientific research often have misleading headlines meant to grab readers. News articles about scientific publishing are rarely subject to the same forces simply because relatively few people are interested. This morning, Nature News published one of the most misleading headlines ever: [/caption] [caption id="attachment_2111" align="alignleft" width="160px"> CC BY Image courtesy of Flickr user Steven Depolo In fact, Nature did not make it’s articles free to view. […]

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  • Is this peer reviewed? Predatory journals and the transparency of peer review.

    Is this peer reviewed? Predatory journals and the transparency of peer review.

    By Bonnie Swoger | November 26, 2014 |

    A few days ago, we learned that another spoof paper (PDF) had been accepted to an ostensibly peer reviewed journal . The paper was a simple repetition of the words “Get me off your f***ing mailing list” for 10 pages, complete with section headings and appropriate figures. […]

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  • Preserving scholarly information: LOCKSS, CLOCKKS, and portico

    Preserving scholarly information: LOCKSS, CLOCKKS, and portico

    By Bonnie Swoger | November 13, 2014 |

    While the switch from print to digital publishing has been embraced by younger researchers and students, older faculty are a little more nervous about the impact of this (nearly complete) transition. This is somewhat related to the loss of print copies to hold in their hands and read, but for many, there is a larger issue. […]

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  • My personal information management strategies

    My personal information management strategies

    By Bonnie Swoger | October 31, 2014 |

    I have systems set up to help me keep track of most of my personal information (files, images, etc.). Sometimes, these systems break down, especially when I get busy or overwhelmed. I spent 30 minutes this morning searching for a picture of notes written on a white board in a meeting last Spring. […]

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  • Should we put our money where our citations are?

    By Hadas Shema | October 14, 2014 |

    A while back I covered a study called “ From funding agencies to scientific agency ,” by researchers from Indiana University’s Department of Information and Library Science (Bollen, Crandall, Junk, Ding & Börner, 2014) which suggested an alternative for today’s method of allocating research funds using peer review. […]

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  • Correcting the scientific record: An introduction to retractions

    Correcting the scientific record: An introduction to retractions

    By Bonnie Swoger | October 14, 2014 |

    The modern scholarly publication system serves as the primary means of communicating scientific results, typically through peer-reviewed articles. While the peer-review process attempts to keep incorrect, plagiarized and fraudulent work out of scientific journals, it doesn’t catch everything. […]

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  • Scholarly articles and other sources about the Ebola outbreak

    Scholarly articles and other sources about the Ebola outbreak

    By Bonnie Swoger | September 29, 2014 |

    CC-BY-ND Image courtesy of the European Commission DG ECHO Flickr feed. While there has been some high quality news reporting about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, it is also easy to find vague, misleading or erroneous information about the disease and the outbreak. […]

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  • Tools for evaluating scholarly journals

    Tools for evaluating scholarly journals

    By Bonnie Swoger | September 24, 2014 |

    In an information-rich age, one of my main functions as a librarian isn’t helping people find material, but helping them evaluate the material they find. In the past, I’ve discussed how publishers often make it difficult for readers to learn about the review process for a particular journal, and questions authors can ask about potential publication sources. […]

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  • 12 delightful resources for word nerds everywhere

    By Bonnie Swoger | July 24, 2014 |

    My recent post about specialized dictionaries got me thinking about the fun books and sites I have encountered about words and language. I thought I would share a slightly off-topic post about my geeky love for words and language. The most recent bit of geeky word stuff I've seen is Weird Al Yankovic's gift to word nerds everywhere, a parody of Robin Thicke's "Blurred Lines" called "Word Crimes." If audio is your media of choice (or, if you have a long commute, like me) you may want to check out these podcasts : A Way With Words - Available on some public radio stations, this free podcast allows listeners to call in with questions and stories about language. […]

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