ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network
The SA Incubator

The SA Incubator


The next generation of science writers and journalists.
The SA Incubator HomeAboutContact
  • Profile

    The SA Incubator is a place where we explore and highlight the work of new and young science writers and journalists, especially those who are current or recent students in specialized science, health and environmental writing programs in schools of journalism. Here, we will discuss the current state and the future of science writing, and promote the best work that the young writers are doing.

    The blog is written by Bora Zivkovic, Blogs Editor at Scientific American, and Khalil Cassimally, community manager of Nature Education's Scitable blog network.
  • Khalil’s Picks (22 November 2013)

    Another week, more great stuff. We have a great selection today which will make your weekend really really good. Dig in! – A New Kind of Food Science: How IBM Is Using Big Data to Invent Creative Recipes by Aatish Bhatia Computers are constantly getting smarter. But can they ever be creative? A team of [...]

    Keep reading »

    Khalil’s Picks (15 November 2013)

    Another really awesome week with everything from some some meta-science journalism stories to the wonders of rocks ants, crocodiles, dead satellites and Carl Sagan. Yep. – Remixing Science by Paige Brown In his book Remix, Lawrence Lessig documents two different cultures in today’s media landscape: A Read-Only (RO) culture that has historically been the business [...]

    Keep reading »

    Khalil’s Picks (8 November 2013)

    You’ve been waiting the entire week for this, haven’t you? The first piece is a highly-recommended analysis of freelance science journalism salaries. Because you should know about money! Also in this week’s picks: on-the-ground report from Philippines about Typhoon Haiyan, some maths, some cheese, some chemistry. Oh and putting this out there once again: would [...]

    Keep reading »

    Khalil’s Picks (1 November 2013)

    Candy! Candy corn? What exactly is candy corn?! This week’s picks points you to the answer as well as to some super science writing filled with dolphins, octopuses, zombies, rhinos, corals and, umm, engineers! One little question before leaving you to such good stuff: what do you think about receiving the weekly picks in your [...]

    Keep reading »

    Khalil’s Picks (25 October 2013)

    We’re back in business! This week was pretty phenomenal with Shutdown’s effects on science, evolution, history of sand, Google Flu, the chemist that is nature… Quick note before I leave you with this week’s great reads. If you’ve written or read a story which you think is worthy of being on the weekly picks, do [...]

    Keep reading »

    Bora’s Picks (October 11th, 2013)

    chickenEgg

    Seeing Maps of Sounds and Smells by Rose Eveleth: Jorge Louis Borges once described an empire that wanted to build a map. But the maps they had seen before were not precise enough. They had too much compression and approximation. There was too much inexactitude. And so the empire eventually made a map of the [...]

    Keep reading »

    Khalil’s Picks (4 October 2013)

    This week on Picks, we’ve got a great selection: the science (or pseudoscience?) of sleep apps, Nobel guinea pigs, “clean eating,” dinosaurs, the computer that smells and so much more… – Sleep Cycle App: Precise, or Placebo? by Jordan Gaines Lewis Thanks to the Internet, it’s the age of self-diagnosis. People like to learn about (and [...]

    Keep reading »

    Bora’s Picks (September 27th, 2013)

    chickenEgg

    Tibetan Uplift Fools Taxonomists: An Identity Crisis Solved by Anne-Marie Hodge: The Tibetan ground tit (Parus humilis) is a drab, unassuming little songbird. It makes its quiet living exclusively in the highlands of the Tibetan plateau. Although the bird doesn’t look like a troublemaker, it has been an ongoing source of taxonomic controversy for over [...]

    Keep reading »

    Khalil’s Picks (20 September 2013)

    This week on Picks: prosopagnosia (!!!!), violent video games, delusions, white whales, a frog that got fried by a NASA spaceship, and so much more. – Prosopagnosia: Why Some are Blind to Faces by Jordan Gaines Lewis A few months ago, I had an hour-long conversation with Professor P in his office discussing his course that [...]

    Keep reading »

    Bora’s Picks (September 13th, 2013)

    chickenEgg

    Guppies lie about mate choice to trick rivals by Anne-Marie Hodge: When it comes to sex among guppies, competition is high for those at the top of the game. To get around this predicament, a recent study has shown, guppies use trickery. Competition in fish of the Poeciliidae family (fresh-water fish to which guppies belong) [...]

    Keep reading »

    Search this blog:


    • Year:
    • Month:
    • Keyword:

    More from Scientific American

    Scientific American Special Universe

    Get the latest Special Collector's edition

    Secrets of the Universe: Past, Present, Future

    Order Now >

    X

    Email this Article

    X