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Posts Tagged "body image"

Illusion Chasers

Illusion of the Week: OK Go’s New Illusion Video

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Music videos by the alternative rock band OK Go are nothing if not creative. Their previous video “Here It Goes Again” featuring treadmill dancing was mesmerizing, and their newest video, “The Writing’s on the Wall”, is even more compelling, especially for those of us interested in matters of perception.

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Illusion Chasers

Youngest kids are bigger than their parents think

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Recent research published in Current Biology indicates that human parents are subject to a previously unknown “baby illusion” that makes them misperceive their youngest child as smaller than he or she is, regardless of age.

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Illusion Chasers

Fat Tuesday: Hypoglycemia Is Tied To Low Income In Diabetics

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I disagree with this study’s conclusion. It’s not that I don’t believe that low-income is tied to diabetes and hypoglycemia at the end of the pay cycle. I do believe it. But I suspect that these diabetics are eating too much inexpensive high-carbohydrate junk foods at the end of their pay cycle, rather than starving.

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Illusion Chasers

Illusion of the Week: Japanese Burger-Chain Breaks the Curse of OCHOBO!

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Horking down a huge honking burger–American style–is considered unladylike in Japan. So Freshness Burger uses an unconventional approach to maintaining Ochobo–the Japanese cultural practice of maintaining small delicate mouth features in women. They use illusory replacement of the disgusting burger-eating pie-hole with the dainty and ladylike fake ochobo face mask.

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Illusion Chasers

Fat Tuesday: Why stress leads to obesity

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Stress is transient Type II diabetes, even when you’re otherwise healthy.

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Illusion Chasers

Why you can see in the dark: it’s just a bunch of hand-waving

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A team of scientists at the Universities of Rochester and Vanderbilt has found that study participants can see, and follow with their eyes, a ghostly image of their hand, when they wave it in front of their completely occluded eyes.

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Illusion Chasers

Wide Faces Make You Selfish

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An intriguing new paper in PLoS ONE by Haselhuhn and colleagues suggests that men with wide faces make you selfish.

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Illusion Chasers

The Color of Pain

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Want to know an effective way to reduce pain from burns? Cover the affected red area, so you are unable to look at it. Ideally, use a blue bandage.

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Illusion Chasers

Fat Tuesday: Does Jet-Lag Make You Chronobese?

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Chronic jetlag, habitual night shifts, and rotating shift work, can have deleterious consequences on circadian organization and metabolic health, says a new report in the Annals of the New York Academy of Science. The reason may be the significant crosstalk between the circadian system and the metabolic system, leading to “chronobesity”.

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Illusion Chasers

Fat Tuesday: Neurosurgery versus bariatric surgery in obesity

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A study in the journal Neurosurgical Focus has calculated thate DBS will have to be 83% effective in order for it to be a better choice than gastric bypass for obese patients.

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Streams of Consciousness

Can Atheists Be Happy? And Other Answers from Scientific American MIND

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The May/June issue of Scientific American Mind makes its online debut today. As usual, it contains an array of delicacies to sate your curiosity about people. Here are three mouth-watering morsels of brain food from its pages. Knowing Ourselves. How we see ourselves—physically, that is–can play a significant role in our lives. Our body image [...]

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