Skip to main content

"stratigraphy"13 articles archived since 1845

June 6, 1944: The Geology of D-Day

June 6, 1944 – in planning for D-Day – also geology was considered, as aerial photographs of the shores of Normandy were studied to find suitable landing sites for the invasion.

June 6, 2014 — David Bressan
Earth’s Age and the Cosmic Calendar

Earth’s Age and the Cosmic Calendar

During  the 19th century geologists realized that earth was quite older than previously believed, however this discovery posed an even greater question: what about the universe?  Did earth (like some fundamental creationists believed and still believe) predate the cosmos, were  earth and the cosmos created at the same time or came earth later?

November 13, 2014 — David Bressan
Happy Birthday Plate-Tectonics !

Happy Birthday Plate-Tectonics !

September 7, marks the anniversary of the publication of an important paper, “Magnetic Anomalies Over Oceanic Ridges” (1964) describes the discovery of parallel stripes of magnetized igneous rocks along the ocean floor.

September 7, 2014 — David Bressan
Baron Cuvier and the Question How Mummies Could Evolve

Baron Cuvier and the Question How Mummies Could Evolve

“Every one has heard of the Ibis, the bird to which the ancient Egyptians paid religious worship; which they brought up in the interior of their temples, which they allowed to stray unharmed trough their cities, and whose murderer, even though involuntary, was pnished by death; which they embalmed with as much care as their [...]

May 13, 2014 — David Bressan

A Concise History of Geological Maps

March 23, 1769 marks the birthday of pioneering stratigrapher William Smith, who is also credited with creating the first useful geological map, however like many other great accomplishments also Smith’s idea of depicting the distribution of rocks on a topographic map didn’t materialize out of nowhere.

March 22, 2014 — David Bressan
Fire burn, and cauldron bubble… Newton’s Philosopher’s Stone

Fire burn, and cauldron bubble… Newton’s Philosopher’s Stone

“the magisterium, our great work, the stone” “The Alchemist” Act 1. Scene 4 4. – The Philosopher’s Stone Today we remember Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) for his contributions to optics, mechanics and astronomy, but as a typical scholar of his time he was also interested in more obscure knowledge, like provided by alchemy.

October 30, 2013 — David Bressan
Granite Wars – Episode I: Fire & Water

Granite Wars – Episode I: Fire & Water

In 1820 the Italian engineer Count Giuseppe Marzari-Pencati (1779-1836) published a short article about the stratigraphic succession found near the small village of Predazzo.

September 28, 2013 — David Bressan

How Colors Revolutionized Geological Mapmaking

The first maps used symbols to characterize single outcrops; later maps introduced shaded areas to display the distribution of specific rock-types, but due the high printing-costs these maps were printed only in black & white, making them hard to read.

April 13, 2014 — David Bressan
Landslides in a Changing Climate

Landslides in a Changing Climate

A video showing the aftermath of a rockfall in South-Tyrol remembers us that even small mass movements can have disastrous – or even deadly – effects.

February 11, 2014 — David Bressan
Of Mountain Building and Dwarven Treasures

Of Mountain Building and Dwarven Treasures

Alpine-Type Fissures, fissures filled often with large and beautiful crystals of Quartz, Plagioclase, Rutile , Amphibole and even Gold, are – according to Alpine folklore the treasure chambers of dwarves – but how these treasures formed is even more fascinating than legends could figure out… Soon after the basic principles of the succession of rocks [...]

February 8, 2014 — David Bressan
The Man who made Mountains

The Man who made Mountains

U.S.G.S. engineer Bailey Willis ( February 19, 1949) was known for his unorthodox approach to geological questions. Puzzled by the geological structures he discovered in mountain ranges, long before computer-models were available, he constructed a machine to simulate the mountain-forming process.

February 19, 2014 — David Bressan

Celebrate our 170th Anniversary with us!

Get 2 years of All Access for just $170