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Posts Tagged "Seismology"

History of Geology

EQLs Vs. UFOs

BRESSAN_UFO

“Swamp gas?” Mulder, F.W. in the “X-Files ” (1993) Summer is traditionally Silly Season, when newspapers publish strange stories about aliens and monsters again and again to bridge holiday time – and so will July on “History of Geology” be dedicated to frivolous science stories… Earthquake Lights – or short EQLs – seem to be [...]

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History of Geology

For Valentine’s Day: Love can move Mountains (sort of…)

CASSIDYetal_1996_Love_Waves

January 11, 1996 a single seismograph of the Geological Survey of Canada buried in a quiet wooded area on central Vancouver Island started to record an unusual strong seismic signal – slowly, but perpetually increasing in amplitude over time it was recorded only at this station – nearby station (located within a radius of 20km) [...]

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History of Geology

Geologizing with Doctor Who

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November 23, 1963 the first episode of the British science-fiction television programme “Doctor Who*” was broadcast. The series follows the adventures of the “Doctor“, last survivor of the Time Lords, an incredible advanced alien race once native to the planet Gallifrey. In his 50 years long history the abilities of the Doctor to manipulate space [...]

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History of Geology

September 26, 1997: The quake of Assisi

GIOTTO_1200_earthquake

In the early afternoon of September 26, 1997 a sequence of earthquakes hit the Italian province of Umbria. The two main quakes, with a magnitude of 5.6-5.8, were followed by a series of aftershocks -  one aftershock was so strong that it caused the partial collapse of the damaged roof of the basilica of St. [...]

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History of Geology

The Earth-shattering Loch Ness Monster that wasn’t

VERNE_1864_Voyage_au_centre_terre_Plesiosaurus

“I have plenty of theories.” Mulder, F.W. in the “The X-Files” (1993) Summer is traditionally Silly Season, when newspapers publish strange stories about aliens and monsters again and again to bridge holiday time – and so will July on “History of Geology” be dedicated to frivolous science stories… In 2001 the Italian geologist Luigi Piccardi [...]

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History of Geology

December 28, 1908: The Tsunami of Messina

Calabria_1783

In the early morning of December 28, 1908 a 30 to 42 seconds long earthquake with a reconstructed magnitude of 6.7-7.2 hit the Italian cities of Messina and Reggio Calabria. The earthquake damaged 90% of the buildings and broken pipes fuelled a firestorm, an aftereffect known from many other earthquakes; however one of the most [...]

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History of Geology

Tsunami in the Geological Record

The tsunami of Indonesia 2004 and Japan 2011 showed that they are a common element associated with earthquakes. Modern databases list more than 2.000 tsunami events worldwide in the last 4.000 years, most of them recorded in historic documents, chronicles and even myths – and yet tsunami deposits in the geological record seem to be [...]

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History of Geology

An Essential Field Guide to North American Earthquake Beasts

ARNOLD_2012_ayahofinalbig

“It is not good that these stories are forgotten. Friends, you are telling them from mouth to ear, and when your old men die they will be forgotten. It is good that you should have a box in which your laws and your stories are kept. My friend, George Hunt, will show you a box [...]

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History of Geology

The Day’s Work of a Volcanologist: Rumbling Mountains

In just one day and one night – August 24 to 25 – in 79 A.D. a sequence of deadly pyroclastic currents coming from Mount Vesuvius destroyed and buried the cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum. But this volcano, periodically active and despite his modest size considered one of the most dangerous volcanoes of the world, [...]

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History of Geology

May 18, 1980: The eruption of Mount St. Helens

USGS_1980_Mount_St_Helens

October 1792 the crew of the “H.M.S. Discovery“, surveying the western coasts of the American continent, spotted a mountain and named it after the British diplomat Alleyne FitzHerbert, 1st Baron St. Helens (1753-1839). The true origin of Mount St. Helens was revealed to the naturalists only in 1835, when a minor eruption revealed its volcanic [...]

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