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"sedimentology"28 articles archived since 1845

June 6, 1944: The Geology of D-Day

June 6, 1944 – in planning for D-Day – also geology was considered, as aerial photographs of the shores of Normandy were studied to find suitable landing sites for the invasion.

June 6, 2014 — David Bressan

Star Wars Geology

“There are no good wars, with the following exceptions: the American Revolution, World War II, and the Star Wars Trilogy.” Bart Simpson in “Bart the General” (1990) Geology played a role in many past conflicts, but can war – even if only a fictional future war – play a role in geological fieldwork?

June 25, 2014 — David Bressan
October 23, 4004 B.C.: Happy Birthday Earth!

October 23, 4004 B.C.: Happy Birthday Earth!

October 23 is (in)famous as supposed earth’s birthday – this date is mentioned in many textbooks retelling the life of Irish Archbishop James Ussher (1581-1656).

October 22, 2013 — David Bressan
The (Zombie-)Toad-in-the-Hole

The (Zombie-)Toad-in-the-Hole

May 8, 1733 two workers, Anders Halfwarder and Olof Sigräfwer, reported excited to superintendent Johan Gråberg, who was inspecting the quarry of Nybro near the village of Wamlingebo (Gotland, Sweden), a very strange discovery.

October 31, 2014 — David Bressan
In Search of the Lost Land of Gold (and mummified baboons too)

In Search of the Lost Land of Gold (and mummified baboons too)

“Suddenly I heard a noise as of thunder, which I thought to be that of a wave of the sea. The trees shook, and the earth was moved. I uncovered my face, and I saw that a serpent drew near…[]…his body was as overlaid with gold, and his colour as that of true lazuli….[]… it [...]

August 30, 2013 — David Bressan
Physician Paracelsus and early Medical Geology

Physician Paracelsus and early Medical Geology

Philippus Theophrastus Aureolus Bombastus von Hohenheim (1493-1541), better known as Paracelsus, is considered one of the most important mystics and physicians of all times.

September 26, 2014 — David Bressan

A Concise History of Geological Maps

March 23, 1769 marks the birthday of pioneering stratigrapher William Smith, who is also credited with creating the first useful geological map, however like many other great accomplishments also Smith’s idea of depicting the distribution of rocks on a topographic map didn’t materialize out of nowhere.

March 22, 2014 — David Bressan
Happy Birthday Plate-Tectonics !

Happy Birthday Plate-Tectonics !

September 7, marks the anniversary of the publication of an important paper, “Magnetic Anomalies Over Oceanic Ridges” (1964) describes the discovery of parallel stripes of magnetized igneous rocks along the ocean floor.

September 7, 2014 — David Bressan
Baron Cuvier and the Question How Mummies Could Evolve

Baron Cuvier and the Question How Mummies Could Evolve

“Every one has heard of the Ibis, the bird to which the ancient Egyptians paid religious worship; which they brought up in the interior of their temples, which they allowed to stray unharmed trough their cities, and whose murderer, even though involuntary, was pnished by death; which they embalmed with as much care as their [...]

May 13, 2014 — David Bressan
Battlefield Earth – the Geological Legacy of War

Battlefield Earth – the Geological Legacy of War

It was during the first World War that the impact of human warfare on the landscape exponentially  increased. Large armies equipped with the most advanced military technology- especially the high energy explosives evolved rapidly – devastated entire landscapes along the Western Front, stretching from the English Channel to the Swiss mountains.

June 13, 2014 — David Bressan
Fire burn, and cauldron bubble… Geological Ingredients for a Perfect Potion

Fire burn, and cauldron bubble… Geological Ingredients for a Perfect Potion

“Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn, and cauldron bubble…” “Macbeth“  Act 4, Scene 1 For everybody who´s planning to boil a magical potion or plans a witches gathering for All Hallows’ Eve, this week I will present some geological ingredients for a perfect witch’s brew: 1.

October 27, 2013 — David Bressan
Fire burn, and cauldron bubble… The Thunderstone

Fire burn, and cauldron bubble… The Thunderstone

“When shall we three meet again? In thunder, lightning, or in rain?” “Macbeth“  Act 1, Scene 1 2. – The Thunderstone Already the Roman scholar Pliny describes them as “Idaei dactyli” (the fingers from the mountain Ida).

October 28, 2013 — David Bressan
Granite Wars – Episode I: Fire & Water

Granite Wars – Episode I: Fire & Water

In 1820 the Italian engineer Count Giuseppe Marzari-Pencati (1779-1836) published a short article about the stratigraphic succession found near the small village of Predazzo.

September 28, 2013 — David Bressan

You ever dance with the Devil’s Fossils…

“Tell me something, my friend. You ever dance with the devil in the pale moonlight?” (“Batman” 1989) The night before December 6, belongs to the Krampus, a beast-like demon in the Alpine folklore – and strange marks can be found on some rocks in the Dolomites - resembling the imprints of an exceptional large cloven [...]

December 5, 2013 — David Bressan
Alexander von Humboldt and the Hand-Beast

Alexander von Humboldt and the Hand-Beast

The German naturalist F. W. H. Alexander von Humboldt (born September 14, 1769-1859) is remembered as great geographer and explorer (maybe his name is even the most common on topographic maps), but his early education focused on mining engineering (and economy, as wished by his mother) and he made some important contributions to geology, for [...]

September 14, 2014 — David Bressan
Thomas Jefferson’s Patriotic Monsters

Thomas Jefferson’s Patriotic Monsters

In the late 18th century earth-sciences experienced a revolution. The principles of modern rock classification were introduced and sediments subdivided by the content of embedded fossils.

May 15, 2014 — David Bressan

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