ADVERTISEMENT
  About the SA Blog Network

Posts Tagged "#SciAmCities"

Anthropology in Practice

On My Shelf: Geologic City (A Review)

Ed Note: “On My Shelf” is my review series, covering notable books and events. For more notables, please see the reviews still housed at the old home of Anthropology in Practice. “New York is not composed of solid substances. It is a dynamic system of multi-layered flows of earth materials that travel through time and [...]

Keep reading »
Anthropology in Practice

The Truth in Pictures: Disasters in the Digital Age

irene_amo_2011236_lrg

For two days Hurricane Irene pounded the coast of the Eastern United States. Though she was ultimately downgraded to a tropical storm, the damage from flooding and downed branches left no doubt as to the power she commanded: washed out roads and rail lines, flooded homes, and widespread power failures left millions trying to pick [...]

Keep reading »
Anthropology in Practice

Mobilizing The Urban Network

Once upon a time there was a family that lived in homes raised on platforms in the sky. They had cars that flew and sorta drove themselves. Their sidewalks carried them to where they needed to go. Video conferencing was the norm, as were appliances which were mostly automated. And they had a robot that [...]

Keep reading »
Anthropology in Practice

A Tale of Two Undergrounds

“To be happy, stay hidden.” – Yopie, Parisian cataphile Ever since reading Jennifer Toth’s The Mole People as a teen, I’ve been intrigued by the metropolitan underground. Cities teem with life, and change happens at a dizzying pace. But what lurks beneath the streets remains a mystery to many—it almost remains a realm lost to [...]

Keep reading »
Anthropology in Practice

Smells From the Past: The Fulton Fish Market

Ed Note: This post originally appeared on The Urban Ethnographer, where it was selected as a ResearchBlogging Editor’s Selection. It has been slightly edited for posting here. It was chosen for publication in The Open Lab competition. It’s been a very hot summer here in New York City. And the city smells. It’s more than [...]

Keep reading »
Anthropology in Practice

When the Lights Go Down in the City

Ed note: This post originally appeared on the original home of Anthropology in Practice. It seemed appropriate to share in light of the SciAm cities feature – particularly as I’m traveling. See you Friday! As the sun sinks over the Hudson River, New York City doesn’t power down. Lights flicker on and soon the famous [...]

Keep reading »
Culturing Science

Urban ecology doesn’t have enough humans in it

citynature2

When you read the word “nature,” what do you think of? Maybe you imagine a dark wood with sunlight reaching a mottled floor of foliage, thrushes singing and chipmunks hopping. Maybe you peer through grassy dunes at sanderlings running back and forth in the surf , occasionally halting to frantically peck at the sand. Or [...]

Keep reading »
Guest Blog

Hunter-Gatherers Show Human Populations Are Hardwired for Density

137416172_59b16011a7_z

High density living seems like a particularly modern phenomenon. After all, the first subway didn’t run until 1863 and the first skyscraper wasn’t built until 1885. While cities have existed for thousands of years—some with population densities that rival today’s major metropolises—most of humanity has lived at relatively low densities until recently, close to the [...]

Keep reading »
Lab Rat

Plague and the city

Medieval city - note lack of plumbing.

In terms of human evolution, cities are a relatively modern invention. Nobody is quite sure when or where the first cities started to develop, but they are generally thought to be a product of increasing reliance on agriculture that started around 5000BC  Nowadays, cities have spread across the planet becoming larger and larger and, as [...]

Keep reading »
Symbiartic

Tagging Science Art

Another one by Banksy, the metaphor about cleaning up cave paintings comes through like a splash of cold water. I love this one. {link url="http://www.streetartutopia.com/?p=2014"}Image source{/link}

Pssshhh!  This blog has been tagged for Cities month on Scientific American. Street science-art. Yeah, the science is often incorrect or out of date.  The conceptually popular and wildly incorrect ‘Ascent of Man’ is popular with street artists. It interests me how much of this counter-cultural art movement in our public spaces addresses evolution over [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

Tokiwa T. Smith: Exposing and encouraging urban youth in science and math

This month’s issue of Scientific American Magazine is a special edition about Cities: Better, Greener, Smarter.  Having been born and raised in a city – Memphis, Tennessee, and presently living in another city – St. Louis, Missouri – I’m always interested in ways that urban areas seem to be the center of all kinds of attention.  [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

Teaching Science with Citizen Science: Animal Behavior

There’s a great new Nature Program coming on tonight.  There will be scenes of daring escapes and chases, close calls, predator-prey interactions, mating and parenting behavior. Oh, it will be AWESOME! What channel? Look right outside your door and there it is - a whole wide wild world! Wild Kingdom from your Window: Local edition. Your [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

Dealing with Waste & Sewage – the cost of “civilized” living: An ode to the Commode

The Slide Show of Commodes at Christine Gorman’s A Brief History of the Toilet really brings this month’s Special Edition on Cities home.  After all, everybody poops; and in urban areas dealing with all the waste from the thousands or millions of bottoms of residents and visitors each day is perhaps the very first necessity [...]

Keep reading »
The Urban Scientist

Wildlife Watching in the City

When I first started doing science outreach, leading an afterschool biology and environmental science club in a St. Louis area public high school, I soon realized the biggest obstacle I had teaching ecology and conservation.  Among the students, there was an overwhelming sense that outside was full of noise and clutter of human innovation such [...]

Keep reading »
The White Noise

U.S. cities breaking bad: why do these have the worst drug problems?

drugmapoftheusa

We all have favorite metropolises across the U.S., romantic or un-romantic notions of what certain cities hold in our mind’s eye: San Francisco for its bridges and climate, Detroit for its cars and manufacturing, New York for its theatre and art. But like unique landscape and culture, certain cities have come to harbor certain drug [...]

Keep reading »

More from Scientific American

Scientific American Holiday Sale

Black Friday/Cyber Monday Blow-Out Sale

Enter code:
HOLIDAY 2014
at checkout

Get 20% off now! >

X

Email this Article

X