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Posts Tagged "power"

Anthropology in Practice

Editor’s Selections: Power and Corruption, and Physical Punishment

Ed Note: Part of my online life includes editorial duties at ResearchBlogging.org, where I serve as the Social Sciences Editor. Each Thursday, I pick notable posts on research in anthropology, philosophy, social science, and research to share on the ResearchBlogging.org News site. To help highlight this writing, I also share my selections here on AiP. [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

When the Lights Go Down in the City

Ed note: This post originally appeared on the original home of Anthropology in Practice. It seemed appropriate to share in light of the SciAm cities feature – particularly as I’m traveling. See you Friday! As the sun sinks over the Hudson River, New York City doesn’t power down. Lights flicker on and soon the famous [...]

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@ScientificAmerican

Beyond the Light Switch Wins 2012 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award

Beyond the Light Switch, a Detroit Public Television two-part documentary hosted by Scientific American Associate Editor David Biello, has been awarded a Silver Baton 2012 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award, it was announced today. Biello and the production team of Ed Moore, Bill Kubota, Paul Dzendzel, Genevieve Savage and Jordan Wingrove spent more than a year [...]

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Beautiful Minds

Can You Smell Personality?

original

First impressions matter. This may not come as much of a surprise, but just how quickly we form impressions, and which cues we use to make such rapid judgements may very much surprise you. Take the face. Superstar social psychologist Nalini Ambady (**see below) and her colleagues found that judgements of traits relating to power (competence, dominance, [...]

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Guest Blog

Frans de Waal on the human primate: Strength is weakness

Editor’s Note: This post is the third in a four-part series of essays for Scientific American by primatologist Frans de Waal on human nature, based on his ongoing research. (The first post, on our sense of fairness, can be read here, and a second post, on the impact of crowding, is here.) De Waal and [...]

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Observations

Fish Shoots Down Prey with Super-Powered Jet [Video]

archer fish water jet

With a juicy insect dinner perched on a leaf above the water, what is a hungry little archer fish down below to do? Knock it down with a super-powered, super-precise jet of water that packs six times the power the fish could generate with its own muscles, according to new findings published online October 24 [...]

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Observations

Ownership Ties Among Global Corporations Strangely Resemble a Bow Tie

Large international corporations can control a wide variety of smaller companies. For example, Scientific American is a publication of Nature Publishing Group, which is a subsidiary of the Georg Von Holtzbrinck Publishing Group in Germany. This group also owns a number of other publishers in the U.S., United Kingdom, and Germany, a pyramid that includes [...]

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Observations

Massive offshore wind-power backbone inspired by marine scientist’s model

offshore wind turbines

Renewable energy made big national headlines October 12 as a group of investors, including search engine giant Google, announced plans to build a 560-kilometer offshore wind power transmission "backbone" off the U.S. eastern seaboard. The developers of the plan say it will make wind power more economical and enhance the reliability of the existing grid. [...]

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Observations

CERN cuts power to part of the LHC, says the setback is minor

LHC, CERN

Just two days after the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) reached a major milestone by producing 1.18 terra-electron volts (TeV), more than one trillion electron volts) of energy, the particle physics lab CERN had to cut power to one of the accelerator’s sites following a problem with a power supplier. The outage did not affect the [...]

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Plugged In

Imagine There’s No Garbage. I Wonder If I Can.

In the U.S. we throw away about 70% more garbage per person than in Sweden.

In John Lennon’s iconic song “Imagine,” he paints a world without war, greed or hunger. I’d like to add garbage to his list. Yup, plain ol’ trash. It’s everywhere. It’s persistent, and as the name implies, it’s dirty. When scanning the globe to check out ways different countries address this problem, I pause at Sweden. [...]

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Plugged In

Get Used to It

Today’s suggestion? Get used to it. Days of unspeakable heat? The heat taking the usual storm systems and turning them excessively violent? Lack of investment in infrastructure making recovery from those storms lengthy and piecemeal? Check, check, and check. Remember the “Snowstorm of 88” narratives we all grew up listening to? The next generation of [...]

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PsySociety

I’m Excited About The Royal Baby (And It’s Okay If You Are Too)

Royal Wedding - The Newlyweds Greet Wellwishers From The Buckingham Palace Balcony

It’s official. Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, gave birth to the “royal baby” on July 22nd, a bouncing baby boy who will one day be the King of the United Kingdom. Although many Americans are thrilled to partake in the Royal Baby fanfare, I’ve also seen a lot of discussions revolving around the questionable morality of [...]

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