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Posts Tagged "parenting"

Anthropology in Practice

What makes theme parks popular vacation destinations?

Disney World's Big Thunder, 2008. Photo by author.

One of the hallmarks of the Fourth of July weekend here in the United States is that it’s a big travel weekend. Many people take advantage of the holiday to plan vacations (it’s an extra day off, after all). And if children are a part of the traveling troupe, theme parks are often popular destinations. [...]

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Anthropology in Practice

It Takes a (Virtual) Village

You know the old saying that parenting doesn’t come with a handbook? Well, maybe it doesn’t need one—there’s Facebook. In many ways I feel as though I’m watching the children of some of my friends grow up on Facebook. I’ve been with them from their first status update (e.g., “Introducing Jane Smith at 7lbs, 6oz [...]

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Bering in Mind

Hey, Andrew Sullivan, Stop Calling My Penis “Mutilated”

  Andrew Sullivan, gay political pundit and blogger at The Daily Beast, lobbed some rather nasty insinuations my way last Wednesday. He was flabbergasted that any fellow gay man could possibly think that infant male circumcision is justifiable. “The whole thing is madness,” wrote Sullivan, disgusted with the very thought of it. Now before I [...]

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Context and Variation

New iPhone App Helps Parents Get the Right Vaccine Information

When I was pregnant with my daughter in 2007/2008, the anti-vaccine movement was strong and hadn’t been fully debunked. My daily – hourly – thoughts revolved around the fear of a C-section. I was also consumed with doubts as to what we would do once I gave birth and my husband and I were responsible [...]

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Context and Variation

If You Think Giving a Child Poorer Options is Good for All Children, You Are a Bad Person: Not Actually a Manifesto

kiddokaleidoscope

Something has been sitting in my craw for a while since reading that clickbait “manifesto” on how people who put their kids in private school are bad people. The author’s gleeful and unapologetic anti-intellectual attitude for one (I didn’t read any books AND I’M TEH AWSUMZ!), troubling coming from someone writing on education. The claim [...]

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Context and Variation

Ladybusiness Anthropologist Throws Up Hands, Concedes Men Are the Reason for Everything Interesting in Human Evolution

Hugh Hefner and some of his earlier feminine companions. Being a proper male, he has of course traded them in for younger ones.

Like most modern anthropologists, I have challenged the idea that human evolution is entirely motivated by men’s desires, interests, behaviors and strategies. But feelings of doubt have nagged at me for years – impostor syndrome, internalized sexism, and just a general feeling of inferiority and small-brainedness. Then, PLoS Computational Biology published a piece by Morton [...]

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Context and Variation

My response to the Guardian pseudoscience on girls and science

Just wanted to give a quick heads up to those of you who follow on the blog but not on Twitter or Facebook (personal, blog) that Chris Chambers and I have a piece in the Guardian today responding to the recent pseudoscience on why more girls don’t pursue science in places like the US and [...]

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Context and Variation

Back to Work! Autonomy and the Stress of Being a Professor

important list

I used to have a colleague who thought it was funny to yell “back to work!” whenever he saw me. He would regale me, a young, breastfeeding assistant professor with an infant in tow and a 750 student course, with tales of when he was an assistant professor and would work all day, come home [...]

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Context and Variation

Link love: Parenting, SCIENCE, Boobs and Other Objects

I’ve accumulated a number of interesting readings over the last few weeks, most related in at least some way to ladybusiness, and I thought I would give my readers a chance to procrastinate too. Parenting PhD in Parenting: 4 Ways Parents Can Help Break Down Society’s Gender Assumptions. This is the fourth in a four-part [...]

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Context and Variation

Happy Mother’s Day: To All the Allomothers

The kiddo at about five months with my sister.

Once a week I get four allergy shots and then sit in a small waiting room for thirty minutes to make sure I don’t have any adverse reactions. Today, my husband came along to spend some time with me and make use of the free wi-fi. We chatted quietly while he did some service work [...]

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Context and Variation

Trade Time and Energy So You Can Live Slow, Reproduce Fast

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Who makes your food? Do you live alone and do everything yourself, or are you part of a partnership, roommate situation, or extended family where food is shared? Most likely, the more complicated your living situation, the more complicated the food allocation. Perhaps one person buys the food and another cooks it, or everyone shares [...]

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Context and Variation

Why We Shouldn’t Prescribe Hormonal Contraception to 12 Year Olds

Painted rock that reads "Ellen congrats on beating teen pregnancy! Happy 20th birthday LSC 2010"

This is a re-post, with slight editing, of a piece I wrote on the old blog after last year’s AAPA meetings. I would like to keep thinking on this topic so thought I would share this before I write anything new for the Sci Am space. Variation in adolescent menstrual cycles, doctor-patient relationships, and why [...]

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Context and Variation

Building Babies: Interview with Julienne Rutherford

Julienne Rutherford hard at work, doing awesome science.

As I mentioned Wednesday, Building Babies, the volume edited by me, Katie Hinde and Julienne Rutherford will be out in only a few months in one of the fastest turnarounds I know of for a book of this nature. It also happens to be awesome. I shared an interview with Lady Editor Katie on Wednesday, [...]

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Guest Blog

Good Dads and Not-So-Good Dads in the Animal Kingdom

Happy father’s day! First off, to every father out there (biological or not), this is the time where we stand up and say thank you. We may not always show it, but we love you and appreciate everything you have done for us thus far. Today is also the day where we celebrate the uniqueness [...]

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Guest Blog

Blaming parents: What I’ve learned and unlearned as a child psychiatrist

The fact that he’d stopped crying scared me. Damn rear-facing car seat. I couldn’t see him as I was driving to the hospital at 3 a.m. Now the hospital construction was making it impossible to find the entrance to the emergency room, let alone a place to leave the car. Getting out of the car [...]

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Guest Blog

Reflections on biology and motherhood: Where does Homo sapiens fit in?

ResearchBlogging.org

As a mom to three young primates, I spend a lot of time thinking about the large role that biology plays in my life. After all, nothing could be more important (biologically speaking) than birthing and raising these offspring. It’s easy for me to type that previous statement; but it’s not quite so easy for [...]

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Observations

Baby-Led Weaning Leads to Leaner Kids

baby eating food weaning

Those little pursed lips and that tiny crinkled nose might not just mean that your baby isn’t a fan of pureed peas or mashed sweet potatoes. Some of the refusals to all of those “here-comes-the-airplane” attempts to feed a weaning infant might also be the child’s way of saying that she or he is just [...]

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PsySociety

Happy Father’s Day! The Psychology of Papas.

DadsDay

When thinking about parents and children, most people — including psychological researchers — tend to focus on the characteristics and importance of the mother-child bond. However, in honor of Father’s Day, I think it’s about time to focus a little attention on the importance of Dads.

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PsySociety

Fox News Fact Check: Are studies on maternal employment all tinged with political bias?

Fox News

Last week, the anchors at Fox News made headlines when they covered the recent Pew Research Center finding that 40% of all households in America have a female primary breadwinner. About 1/3 of these households consist of two-parent households where the mothers make more money than their husbands, and the remaining 2/3 consist of single [...]

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PsySociety

Fox News Fact Check: Is it bad for lower-income kids if Mom has a job outside the home?

Fairbalanced

Last week, the anchors at Fox News made headlines when they covered the recent Pew Research Center finding that 40% of all households in America have a female primary breadwinner. About 1/3 of these households consist of two-parent households where the mothers make more money than their husbands, and the remaining 2/3 consist of single [...]

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PsySociety

The Incredible Importance of Mom

I don't think I ever wanted THIS much proximity, Mom.

Imagine that you’re an infant monkey, and you’ve just been thrown into a cage after several hours in isolation. You’ve been deprived of food, so you’re starving. Facing you are two adult-looking (fake) monkeys, designed to look like each one could potentially be your mother. On the left is a “wire mother,” equipped with a [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

The Power of Dad

Courtesy of Need2CPhotography via Flickr.

In the 1994 film Junior, a male scientist becomes pregnant and gives birth to a baby girl. It’s a rather ridiculous tale, but if any man could be given the superpower of giving birth, my dad should have been the one. I have never met anyone who loved kids and parenting more than my father [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Who Needs Stimulants for ADHD?

Ritalin. Courtesy of en:User:Sponge via Wikimedia Commons.

In 1970, 150,000 U.S. children were taking stimulant medications. By 2007, that number had risen to 2.7 million, according to pediatrician Sanford Newmark of the University of California, San Francisco. In the video embedded in this post, titled “Do 2.5 Million Kids Really Need Ritalin?” Newmark analyzes the reasons behind the rise in prescriptions, which [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

How To Coach Parents [Audio]

Most moms and dads are not taught how to parent. We are supposed to just know what to do, I suppose. But even if you have a relatively calm and obedient child, moments inevitably arise when you could really use an owner’s manual. Belatedly, I think I’ve found one. Parent-child interaction therapy is a kind [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Teen Builds Gateway to the Brain for Girls

Girls run on a brain maze

The Synapse Project “encourages young women to enter the field of neuroscience through information and mentorship,” according to its website. This endeavor, an amalgam of outlets for kids, information for teens and career advice for young women, turns out to be the brainchild of … a child, one keenly interested in the brain. Sixteen-year-old Grace [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

The Making of a Mathematical Mind: 1 Step at a Time

worksheet for times 5

One time when I was in the third grade, I got sick and missed a week of school. My dad wanted me to keep up with my schoolwork, so he brought my assignments and books home. I did the required work in the math workbook quickly, or so the story goes, and went on to [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

How to Make Kids Smarter—and Ease Existential Terror

A few months ago, I logged on to Lumosity.com to play my daily dose of brain games. The company had given me a free, temporary account so that I could try out their system as part of my research for an article I was writing on brain training. My then 11-year-old son wanted to play, [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

Where Are the Gifted Minorities?

Guest blog by Frank C. Worrell, Paula Olszewski-Kubilius and Rena F. Subotnik For more than a quarter century, critics have faulted gifted education programs for catering to kids from advantaged backgrounds. These programs do, after all, typically enroll outsized numbers of European American and Asian American students hailing from relatively well-off homes. Members of other [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

The Education of Character: Jumping Jacks for the Mind [Video]

One of the hardest aspects of school for young children is in some ways the simplest: sitting still. Recess is the time worn antidote to such restlessness. But regular physical exercise is also generally important to academic performance—and not just for young students. It can help boost various types of cognition in kids into the [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

The Education of Character: Your Brain in a Coke Bottle [Video]

Emotion is a powerful driver of behavior, sometimes too powerful. Virtually everyone has had the experience of reacting in the heat of the moment only to later regret his or her words or deed. An almond-shaped structure in the center of the brain called the amygdala is a hub for emotional responses. When it’s in [...]

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Streams of Consciousness

The Education of Character—Stoking Memory with Stones [Video]

In MindUP, a social and emotional learning program pioneered by actor Goldie Hawn, children learn to be mindful—that is, attuned to the present without judgment. This skill engenders a healthy outlook on life, hones the ability to pay attention and creates a sense of calm, preparing the mind for learning. (For more on the brain [...]

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Symbiartic

Pro-Vaccine Communication: You’re Doing it Wrong

© Glendon Mellow

A particular drum I like to beat, is about science communicators learning how to use images effectively. Give your blog post illustration some thought. Don’t just stick any old candied cherry on the top of your post: make sure it’s the right maraschino cherry. Then add sprinkles. If you are having trouble finding good images [...]

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The Thoughtful Animal

Humans Aren’t The Only Ones Who Need To Avoid The Heat: How Birds Avoid Scrambled Eggs

kentish plover

July was the hottest month ever recorded in Washington, D.C., in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and in Wichita Falls, Texas, as measured by the National Weather Service. In fact, the NWS has issued an “excessive heat warning” for a huge swath of middle America extending from northwestern Illinois and central Iowa in the north to central [...]

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