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Posts Tagged "malaria"

Anthropology in Practice

Editor’s Selections: Family Medical Histories, A Grave In The Bahamas, Medieval Malaria, And Macaques

Part of my online life includes editorial duties at ResearchBlogging.org, where I serve as the Social Sciences Editor. Each Thursday, I pick notable posts on research in anthropology, philosophy, social science, and research to share on the ResearchBlogging.org News site. To help highlight this writing, I also share my selections here on AiP. This week: [...]

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Guest Blog

In Africa, Climate Change Wages War on Bodies, Not Just Lands

Dr. Kassahun Desalegn and patient

While the African Union concentrates on strategies to mitigate the devastating financial effects climate change is having on Africans, I worry instead about its impact on our bodies. As a doctor working in my native Ethiopia, I see the results of our warming planet, not just in the dry earth or the torrential skies, but [...]

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Guest Blog

Annals of the Malaria War: Legions of Health Workers Launch an Attack

When I stepped into the schoolhouse, I instinctively tucked my camera back inside its case. Health workers had taken over its one room for the day, and a ritualistic exchange of greetings gave way to tense silence. The health workers were upset. They refused to hand out malaria medicines as dozens of children and mothers [...]

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Guest Blog

Annals of the Malaria War: Move Over Angelina Jolie

Image of health worker checking nutrition

We’re driving on a dirt road and my interpreter, one of the friendliest guys I’ve ever met, is absorbed in a conversation with a health worker in our group. Cornfields and rice paddies paint the landscape chartreuse. Donkey carts and herds of goats swerve into the plants when we rumble past. The interpreter and the [...]

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Guest Blog

Lindau Nobel Meeting–Bearing the Fruits of Global Health Research

The panel on global health at the opening ceremony of the 61st Meeting of Nobel Laureates in Lindau well and truly laid the gauntlet down to young researchers from around the world. On the panel was: Bill Gates, chairman of Microsoft and co-founder of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; Ada Yonath, Noble Laureate in [...]

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Molecules to Medicine

Hurricanes, Poverty, and Neglected Infections

This week, the anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, is always a time for me for reflection on poverty and justice in America. Katrina brought focus to our country’s disparities and the response—or lack thereof—to disasters. And now, ironically on the anniversary of Katrina, Hurricane Isaac struck New Orleans again. Even prior to the Hurricane, in 2005, [...]

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Molecules to Medicine

Counterfeit Drugs: a Deadly Problem

WHO IMPACTbrochure

Counterfeit drugs appear to be “all the rage.” For some time there have been problems with counterfeit antimalarials, as I learned when I studied in Bangkok at the Asian Tropical Medicine Course in 2006. The practice was common in Asia, causing serious problems with increasing resistance to antimalarials there, as well as in Africa, where [...]

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Observations

Cell Phone Data Could Help Clip Malaria Spread

cell phone location data travel kenya malaria

Your cell phone location information can be used to help you find restaurants or help companies serve you targeted ads. What if all of this data could also play a role in studying and fighting deadly infectious diseases, such as malaria? An international team of researchers has done just that—for an entire country. People can [...]

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Observations

Web Site Tracks Mosquito-Borne Diseases Spread Globally by Air Travel

The emergence of international air travel in the 20th century enabled an unprecedented spread of ideas, cultures and communication. Unfortunately, modern aviation has also proved an effective means of spreading diseases. Air travel didn’t introduce worldwide pandemics, of course, but with tens of millions of scheduled international flights annually and hundreds of millions of passengers [...]

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Observations

Mosquito Guts Implanted with GMO Malaria Assassins

Anopheles stephensi mosquito

Mosquitoes don’t cause malaria—the disease comes courtesy of the Plasmodium falciparum parasite. Yet mosquitoes do a fine job of spreading Plasmodium to about half a billion people every year. The parasite depends on mosquitoes for more than just transport, however. Plasmodium goes through much of its complex life cycle inside the mosquito, passing through the [...]

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Observations

Malaria Deaths Falling Slowly, WHO Report Says

In the long fight against malaria, progress finally seems to be coming, if incrementally. The number of people who died from malaria in 2010 fell 5 percent from the previous year and has dropped 26 percent from 2000 levels, according to a new World Health Organization (WHO) report. The decline might seem modest given the [...]

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Observations

Cell Phone Cameras Capture Microscopic Images to Diagnose Malaria and other Diseases

microscope

Smart phone apps can help you check your vision, keep tabs on your blood-glucose levels and track your blood pressure. Earlier this year the U.S. Food and Drug Administration even approved an app that allows doctors to view scans on an iPhone or iPad to help them make diagnoses on the go. But fancy apps [...]

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Observations

Malaria-carrying mosquitoes might be splitting into new species

malaria mosquito two types that might become different species

By any other name, the Anopheles gambiae mosquito would still bear—with its tiny buzzing wing beats—the deadly threat of malaria, which can be passed to humans in a single blood-sucking bite. But what if this species were to split in twain? Two new studies, published online October 21 in Science, have found evidence that A. [...]

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Observations

Bite me: New malaria-proof mosquito developed

An estimated one million people die each year from malaria, a parasitic infection transmitted by mosquitoes. Current control strategies involve blasting the bugs with insecticides, or using drugs to kill the parasite once it infects humans. Unfortunately, these methods are becoming less effective as both pests evolve ways to resist the toxic treatments, so new [...]

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Observations

Thousands of new drug leads identified in the fight against malaria

malaria drug candidate compounds

Malaria kills hundreds of thousands of people every year, and the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is behind a majority of those deaths. Although newer drug combinations (of artemisinins) proved effective after resistance to widely used treatments appeared, hints of resistance to this newer therapy are also beginning to emerge, creating a darkening cloud over a [...]

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Observations

Malaria rates drop in the Americas, but travelers still worry

malaria treatment prevention travelers americas who cdc guidelines

MIAMI—Malaria continues to be a global scourge, sickening some 300 million to 500 million people annually. Most of the resulting one million to three million malaria deaths occur in regions where it is highly endemic, such as sub-Saharan Africa and parts of south Asia.  Some parts of the world where malaria was once rampant, however—such [...]

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Observations

Climate change will impact infectious diseases worldwide, but questions remain as to how

infectious disease climate change emerging pandemic spread

NEW YORK—As climatologists weather the IPCC controversy, another storm is brewing, and this one is filled with not with bloggers but with beasts, bugs and bacteria. It is the potential plague of infectious diseases—threatened to be made worse, many scientists propose, by projected changes in the Earth’s climate. At a symposium held yesterday at the [...]

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Plugged In

Hello, Pale Blue Dot

Greetings, and welcome to Day 4 of Plugged In! On behalf of myself, Melissa, Scott, and Robynne, welcome to this shiny new blog of ours. There are so many things to discuss, but to get started, I want explain to you what this blog means to me and what I hope to get out of [...]

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Symbiartic

You’ve never really seen a virus until you see this

13-011FEATURE

Artist Luke Jerram is a UK-based sculptor whose glass sculptures of microscopic life make the invisible visible. I was instantly transfixed by his sculptures’ delicacy and intense beauty. For me, something is captured in these sculptures that is lost in the false-color scanning electron microscope images we typically see of viruses and other extremely small [...]

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