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Posts Tagged "#lnlm11"

Guest Blog

Lindau Nobel Meeting–Shakespeare and Beethoven and Buckminsterfullerene for the Uninitiated

Can one appreciate the deep beauty of science, without mastering calculus, quantum mechanics or molecular genetics? I reckon the answer is yes, but I know at least one Nobel laureate disagrees with me. Sir Harry Kroto made the following comparison during a tense press conference on Wednesday: "Try to explain the culture and the depth [...]

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Guest Blog

Lindau Nobel Meeting–the Future of Global Health

What can be done about global health? It’s the question on everyone’s minds following Peter Agre’s moving talk on malaria ‘without borders’ earlier in the week and Christian De Duve handing the baton of all the world’s challenges to the young researchers in the last lecture: "Our generation has made a mess of it… the future [...]

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Guest Blog

Lindau Nobel Meeting–Glowing Brainbows

Strawberry red, tangerine orange, banana yellow, honeydew green and plum purple. These are some of the cheesy names for the glowing molecules that were developed in Roger Tsien’s laboratory. To be fair, these names do make one thing clear: Roger Tsien has managed to design and produce fluorescent molecules of almost every colour in the [...]

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Guest Blog

Lindau Nobel Meeting–The Future of Biomedicine

The future of medicine is contained in "The Four P’s": Personalised, Predictive, Preventative, and Participatory. Aaron Ciechanover, speaking on a panel on the future of biomedicine at the Lindau meeting, explains: "We may have the ability to profile patients before they get sick, therefore we may have the ability to predict diseases – and also ‘preventative’ [...]

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Guest Blog

Lindau Nobel Meeting–Cowboy Hats and Countesses

This is the 61st year that the Nobel Laureate Meetings have been held at Lindau. The conference was held for the first time in 1951, funded by the wealthy count Lennart Bernadotte, as an effort to restore the international scientific ties that had been severed by the war. The count’s daughter, Bettina Bernadotte, has been [...]

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Guest Blog

Lindau Nobel Meeting–Buckminsterfullerene and the Third Man

Sir Harry Kroto gave a talk yesterday that was unlike any other lecture at the Lindau Meetings so far. Kroto didn’t talk about the work he had done, or about his life as a scientist. Instead, he gave a dazzling presentation showing scores of images to his audience. He kept shifting gears from art to [...]

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Guest Blog

Lindau Nobel Meeting–Peter Agre and Torsten Wiesel: Nobel laureate scientific diplomacy builds bridges

I fear I have already offended Professor Torsten Wiesel only one question into our interview. The softly spoken man and gentle man sitting in front of me is a Nobel Laureate for his work on identifying specialist cell functions in the visual cortex. The Swedish laureate won the prize in 1981, and I am speaking to him [...]

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Guest Blog

Lindau Nobel Meeting–Evolutionary Chemistry with Jean-Marie Lehn

Between the laws of the universe and the rules of life lies a bridge. That bridge, said Nobel laureate Jean-Marie Lehn today, is chemistry. Lehn made his point by asking a simple and intriguing question at the start of his lecture: how does matter become complex? How did elementary particles eventually gave rise to the [...]

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Guest Blog

Lindau Nobel Meeting–Joke van Bemmel, Chromatin and Epigenetics

Joke van Bemmel (imagine how to say it with a Dutch accent – ‘y’ for ‘j’), is a researcher from The Netherlands Cancer Institute in Amsterdam. The enthusiastic 29-year-old van Bemmel is nearing the end of her PhD, and is currently applying to find the ideal postdoc position. The dream is to: "just be doing nice, [...]

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Guest Blog

Lindau Nobel Meeting–Sentences That Win Nobel Prizes

Nobel laureates, like all scientists, have published their findings in peer-reviewed journals. Their initial results, theories and thoughts in these publications have been preserved in the digital archives of the scientific literature, as if they have been frozen in time. I thought it would be a nice idea to go back to these papers, and [...]

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